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Absence of association between reproductive variables and the risk of breast cancer in young women in Sweden and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25167
Source
Br J Cancer. 1990 Jul;62(1):122-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1990
Author
H O Adami
R. Bergström
E. Lund
O. Meirik
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1990 Jul;62(1):122-6
Date
Jul-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous
Age Factors
Breast Feeding
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Menstrual Cycle
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Parity
Pregnancy
Reproduction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
A population-based case-control study was conducted in Sweden and Norway to analyse possible associations between breast cancer occurring before the age of 45 and several different characteristics of the women's reproductive life. A total of 422 (89.2%) of all eligible patients, and 527 (80.6%) of all eligible controls were interviewed. In univariate analyses, different characteristics of child-bearing (parity, age at first birth, years between last birth and diagnosis, duration of breast-feeding, and number of induced and spontaneous abortions), measures of the fertile or ovulating period (age at menarche, years between menarche and first pregnancy, and estimates of the menstruation span) and symptoms of anovulatory cycles or infertility were all seemingly unrelated to, or at most weakly associated with breast cancer. Adjustment for possible confounding factors in multivariate analyses resulted in largely unaltered risk estimates with odds ratios close to unity and without any significant trends when the exposure variables were studied in categorised or in continuous form. We conclude that reproductive factors did not explain the occurrence of breast cancer before the age of 45 in this population.
PubMed ID
2390471 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adjuvant radiotherapy and risk of contralateral breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24377
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1992 Aug 19;84(16):1245-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-19-1992
Author
H H Storm
M. Andersson
J D Boice
M. Blettner
M. Stovall
H T Mouridsen
P. Dombernowsky
C. Rose
A. Jacobsen
M. Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Rigistry, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1992 Aug 19;84(16):1245-50
Date
Aug-19-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - etiology - radiotherapy
Case-Control Studies
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Menopause
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Neoplasms, Second Primary - etiology
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The risk of contralateral breast cancer is increased twofold to fivefold for breast cancer patients. A registry-based cohort study in Denmark suggested that radiation treatment of the first breast cancer might increase the risk for contralateral breast cancer among 10-year survivors. PURPOSE: Our goal was to assess the role of radiation in the development of contralateral breast cancer. METHODS: A nested case-control study was conducted in a cohort of 56,540 women in Denmark diagnosed with invasive breast cancer from 1943 through 1978. Case patients were 529 women who developed contralateral breast cancer 8 or more years after first diagnosis. Controls were women with breast cancer who did not develop contralateral breast cancer. One control was matched to each case patient on the basis of age, calendar year of initial breast cancer diagnosis, and survival time. Radiation dose to the contralateral breast was estimated for each patient on the basis of radiation measurements and abstracted treatment information. The anatomical position of each breast cancer was also abstracted from medical records. RESULTS: Radiotherapy had been administered to 82.4% of case patients and controls, and the mean radiation dose to the contralateral breast was estimated to be 2.51 Gy. Radiotherapy did not increase the overall risk of contralateral breast cancer (relative risk = 1.04; 95% confidence interval = 0.74-1.46), and there was no evidence that risk varied with radiation dose, time since exposure, or age at exposure. The second tumors in case patients were evenly distributed in the medial, lateral, and central portions of the breast, a finding that argues against a causal role of radiotherapy in tumorigenesis. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of women in our series were perimenopausal or postmenopausal (53% total versus 38% premenopausal and 9% of unknown status) and received radiotherapy at an age when the breast tissue appears least susceptible to the carcinogenic effects of radiation. Based on a dose of 2.51 Gy and estimates of radiation risk from other studies, a relative risk of only 1.18 would have been expected for a population of women exposed at an average age of 51 years. Thus, our data provide additional evidence that there is little if any risk of radiation-induced breast cancer associated with exposure of breast tissue to low-dose radiation (e.g., from mammographic x rays or adjuvant radiotherapy) in later life.
PubMed ID
1640483 View in PubMed
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Age at last full-term pregnancy and risk of breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24153
Source
Lancet. 1993 Jan 2;341(8836):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2-1993
Author
A. Kalache
A. Maguire
S G Thompson
Author Affiliation
Health Promotion Sciences Unit, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK.
Source
Lancet. 1993 Jan 2;341(8836):33-6
Date
Jan-2-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brazil
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
Age at first full-term pregnancy (FTP) has long been thought to be the major reproductive risk factor in breast cancer but a Norwegian study suggested that age at last FTP might be more important. In Norway "high parity" means 4 or more deliveries. Does this finding hold in an area with a much broader distribution of parity? Data from a case-control study done in 1980-82 in Fortaleza and Recife, two cities in Brazil's impoverished north-east, have been used to explore further the influence of age at last FTP. The cases were 509 women with histologically diagnosed breast cancer who were matched with hospital controls for age and area of residence. The analysis was based on case-control pairs interviewed by the same person. High breast cancer risk was associated with low parity; after adjustment for parity, breast cancer risk was related both to late age at first FTP (odds ratio [OR] 1.21 for each 5 year increase, p = 0.008) and to late age at last FTP (OR 1.24, p = 0.0007). However, multivariate analysis revealed that the effect of age at last FTP dominated that of age at first FTP: once age at last FTP was taken into account the effect of age at first FTP was no longer significant (OR 1.08, p = 0.38) while the association with parity became more striking. These results challenge the view that age at first FTP is the principal reproductive variable related to breast cancer risk. Moreover, they suggest that high parity is protective independent of ages at first and last FTP. Given recent worldwide reductions in fertility rates, breast cancer incidence may be expected to increase. Balancing that may be the willingness of some women to complete their families by, say, age 35 if they were to be told that this might reduce their risk of breast cancer.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1993 Feb 20;341(8843):502-38094531
Comment In: Lancet. 1993 Jan 2;341(8836):24-58093271
PubMed ID
8093279 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol intake and mortality among women with invasive breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128247
Source
Br J Cancer. 2012 Jan 31;106(3):592-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-2012
Author
H R Harris
L. Bergkvist
A. Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. holly.harris@ki.se
Source
Br J Cancer. 2012 Jan 31;106(3):592-5
Date
Jan-31-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Breast Neoplasms - etiology - mortality - pathology
Cohort Studies
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Mammography
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Alcohol intake has consistently been associated with increased breast cancer incidence in epidemiological studies. However, the relation between alcohol and survival after breast cancer diagnosis is less clear.
We investigated whether alcohol intake was associated with survival among 3146 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Alcohol consumption was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs).
From 1987 to 2008 there were 385 breast cancer-specific deaths and 860 total deaths. No significant association was observed between alcohol intake and breast cancer-specific survival. Women who consumed 10 g per day (corresponding to approximately 0.75 to 1 drinks) or more of alcohol had an adjusted HR (95% CI) of breast cancer-specific death of 1.36 (0.82-2.26;p(trend)=0.47) compared with non-drinkers. A significant inverse association was observed between alcohol and non-breast cancer deaths. Those who consumed 3.4-9.9 g per day of alcohol had a 33% lower risk of death compared with non-drinkers (95% CI 0.50-0.90;p(trend)=0.04).
Our findings suggest that alcohol intake up to approximately one small drink per day does not negatively impact breast cancer-specific survival and a half drink per day is associated with a decreased risk of mortality from other causes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22215064 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Assessment of chronic radiation exposure as one of risk factors of the development of cancer in industrial city residents exposed to radioactive pollution]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21638
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 1998 Jan-Feb;38(1):86-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
E V Polzik
B A Katsnel'son
M Iu Iakusheva
V S Kazentsev
S V Kuz'min
N D Simchenko
Author Affiliation
Institute of Industrial Ecology, Urals Branch of Russian Academy of Siences, Ekaterinburg.
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 1998 Jan-Feb;38(1):86-94
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Comparative Study
Dermatoglyphics
English Abstract
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Pattern Recognition, Automated
Radiochemistry
Risk factors
Siberia
Smoking - adverse effects
Urban Population
Abstract
With the help of mathematical methods of pattern recognition the analysis of complex cancer risk factors was conducted aiming at estimation the role of chronic radiation exposure in development of lung and breast cancer in dwellers of an industrial city exposed to irregular radioactive contamination as a result of an accident at PO "Mayak". It was shown, that chronic radiation exposure is an important factor, influenced the development of malignant neoplasms in city population.
PubMed ID
9606409 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between childhood body size and seventeen adverse outcomes: analysis of 65,057 European women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302059
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 12 05; 7(1):16917
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-05-2017
Author
Jingmei Li
Mikael Eriksson
Wei He
Per Hall
Kamila Czene
Author Affiliation
Genome Institute of Singapore, 60 Biopolis Street, Genome, #02-01, Singapore, 138672, Singapore. lijm1@gis.a-star.edu.sg.
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 12 05; 7(1):16917
Date
12-05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anorexia - etiology
Body mass index
Body Size - physiology
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Child
Disease - etiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Large childhood body size has been consistently shown to be associated with decreased breast cancer risk. However, it is important to consider the effects of a large childhood body size on other adult diseases. It is not clear if the associations between childhood body size and adult diseases will persist if they later attain healthy weight. The associations between body size at age 7 and 17 adverse outcomes in adulthood were examined using Cox models in a Swedish study of 65,057 women. Large body size at age 7, when compared to small body size, was associated with decreased risk for breast cancer (HR [95% CI]: 0.81 [0.70-0.93]) and increased risks for anorexia (2.13 [1.63-2.77]) and bulimia (1.91 [1.35-2.70]). Neither adjusting for adult BMI nor restricting the dataset to lean adults (BMI?
PubMed ID
29208999 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between GPX1 Pro198Leu polymorphism, erythrocyte GPX activity, alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76101
Source
Carcinogenesis. 2006 Apr;27(4):820-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Gitte Ravn-Haren
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Lars O Dragsted
Bjørn A Nexø
Håkan Wallin
Kim Overvad
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Ulla Vogel
Author Affiliation
Department of Toxicology and Risk Assessment, Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research, Søborg, Denmark. grh@dfvf.dk
Source
Carcinogenesis. 2006 Apr;27(4):820-5
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Breast Neoplasms - etiology - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glutathione Peroxidase - genetics - metabolism
Humans
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
Breast cancer may be related to oxidative stress. Breast cancer patients have been reported to have lower antioxidant enzyme activity than healthy controls and the polymorphism GPX1 Pro198Leu has been associated with risk of lung and breast cancer. The purpose of the present nested case-control study was to determine whether GPX1 Pro198Leu and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in prospectively collected blood samples are associated with breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women and whether GPX activity levels are associated with other known breast cancer risk factors. We matched 377 female breast cancer cases with 377 controls all nested within the prospective 'Diet, Cancer and Health' study of 57 000 Danes. Carriers of the variant T-allele of GPX1 Pro198Leu were at 1.43-fold higher risk of breast cancer compared with non-carriers (95% CI=1.07-1.92). Pre-diagnostic GPX activity tended to be lower in cases compared with controls. GPX activity was positively correlated with intake of alcohol (P
PubMed ID
16287877 View in PubMed
Less detail

Author of Canadian Breast Cancer Study retracts warnings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223606
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1992 Jun 3;84(11):832-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-3-1992

Birth weight as a predictor of breast cancer: a case-control study in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19294
Source
Br J Cancer. 2002 Jan 7;86(1):89-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-7-2002
Author
L J Vatten
B O Maehle
T I Lund Nilsen
S. Tretli
C-c Hsieh
D. Trichopoulos
S O Stuver
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7489 Trondheim, Norway. lars.vatten@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Br J Cancer. 2002 Jan 7;86(1):89-91
Date
Jan-7-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Birth weight
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Organ Size
Placenta - anatomy & histology
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The hypothesis that birth weight is positively associated with adult risk of breast cancer implies that factors related to intrauterine growth may be important for the development of this malignancy. Using stored birth records from the two main hospitals in Trondheim and Bergen, Norway, we collected information on birth weight, birth length and placenta weight among 373 women who developed breast cancer. From the same archives, we selected as controls 1150 women of identical age as the cases without a history of breast cancer. Information on age at first birth and parity were collected from the Central Person Registry in Norway. Based on conditional logistic regression analysis, breast cancer risk was positively associated with birth weight and with birth length (P for trend=0.02). Birth weights in the highest quartile (3730 g or more) were associated with 40% higher risk (odds ratio, 1.4, 95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.9) of breast cancer compared to birth weights in the lowest quartile (less than 3090 g). For birth length, the odds ratio for women who were 51.5 cm or more (highest quartile) was 1.3 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.8) compared to being less than 50 cm (lowest quartile) at birth. Adjustment for age at first birth and parity did not change these estimates. Placenta weight was not associated with breast cancer risk. This study provides strong evidence that intrauterine factors may influence future risk of breast cancer. A common feature of such factors would be their ability to stimulate foetal growth and, simultaneously, to influence intrauterine development of the mammary gland.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Cancer. 2003 Jun 2;88(11):1817-8; author reply 1819-2112772000
PubMed ID
11857017 View in PubMed
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137 records – page 1 of 14.