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13 records – page 1 of 2.

Breast cancer screening: expected and observed incidence and stages of female breast cancer in Gävleborg county, Sweden, and implications for mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26825
Source
Recent Results Cancer Res. 1984;90:101-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
B. Lundgren
Source
Recent Results Cancer Res. 1984;90:101-4
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Female
Humans
Mammography
Mass Screening
Neoplasm Staging
Sweden
PubMed ID
6701367 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer screening programmes: the development of a monitoring and evaluation system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25518
Source
Br J Cancer. 1989 Jun;59(6):954-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
N E Day
D R Williams
K T Khaw
Author Affiliation
MRC Biostatistics, Cambridge, UK.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1989 Jun;59(6):954-8
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Program Evaluation
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
It is important that the introduction of breast screening is closely monitored. The anticipated effect on breast cancer mortality will take 10 years or more fully to emerge, and will only occur if a succession of more short-term end points are met. Data from the Swedish two-county randomised trial provide targets that should be achieved, following a logical progression of compliance with the initial invitation, prevalence and stage distribution at the prevalence screen, the rate of interval cancers after the initial screen, the pick-up rate and stage distribution at later screening tests, the rate of interval cancers after later tests, the absolute rate of advanced cancer and finally the breast cancer mortality rate. For evaluation purposes, historical data on stage at diagnosis is desirable; it is suggested that tumour size is probably the most relevant variable available in most cases.
PubMed ID
2736233 View in PubMed
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Excess mortality from breast cancer in relation to mammography screening in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22330
Source
J Med Screen. 1997;4(1):6-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
P. Lenner
H. Jonsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Med Screen. 1997;4(1):6-9
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Mammography - statistics & numerical data
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Previous randomised studies of mammography screening have shown a significant effect on breast cancer mortality, particularly in women aged 50-69 at randomisation. Breast cancer mortality has traditionally been studied by judgments on causes of death, either from cause of death registers or from medical records. In this study an alternative method was used, estimating the excess mortality associated with breast cancer. SETTING: In 1990 two counties of northern Sweden started population based mammography screening of women aged 40-74. The unscreened population in the two other counties of the same region were selected as controls. RESULTS: Excess mortality associated with breast cancer was lower in the screened population, and was discernible three to four years after the start of screening. The relative risk estimate, based on the cumulative excess number of deaths from breast cancer during 1990-95 in the screened versus the control population aged 40-74 (at diagnosis of breast cancer), was 0.72 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53 to 0.99). For women aged 50-69 it was 0.67 (95% CI 0.46 to 0.99). In the 50-69 age group the estimated excess number of deaths from breast cancer during 1995 was 17.0 per 100,000 women (95% CI 5.0 to 29.0) in the screened counties and 51.1 per 100,000 (95% CI 30.2 to 71.9) in the unscreened counties. CONCLUSIONS: Population based routine screening has substantial effects on breast cancer mortality in women aged 50-69. Estimation of excess mortality can be used in future studies to evaluate the effects of mammography screening on breast cancer mortality.
PubMed ID
9200054 View in PubMed
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Geographic variations of breast carcinoma incidence in Sweden. Are the differences real?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26399
Source
Acta Radiol Oncol. 1986 Mar-Apr;25(2):99-104
Publication Type
Article
Author
L E Rutqvist
J. Carstensen
B. Mattsson
G. Mårdsjö
Source
Acta Radiol Oncol. 1986 Mar-Apr;25(2):99-104
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Autopsy
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Death Certificates
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Registries
Sweden
Abstract
The validity of the reported geographic variations of breast carcinoma incidence in Sweden was assessed by examination of two possible sources of bias: non-notification to the Cancer Registry of diagnosed carcinoma cases and 'biologically benign' breast carcinoma, i.e. with a low disease-specific lethality, e.g. detected accidentally at autopsy. No significant geographic differences in registration deficit were found even though non-notification tended to be slightly higher for old patients in low-incidence areas. Autopsy cases were estimated to account for less than one per cent of all cases and tended to be more frequent in high-incidence areas but the regional differences were generally small and not significant. An analysis of the relationship between 10-year relative survival and age-standardized incidence in 27 different regions revealed no significant correlation, whereas there was a significant positive correlation between age-standardized incidence and mortality. These findings indicate that non-lethal breast carcinoma cases do not explain the variations of incidence. In conclusion, no evidence was found suggesting that the geographic differences were artifactual. Registration deficit and autopsy cases, however, may have slightly increased the variations among elderly women.
PubMed ID
3012964 View in PubMed
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Increasing incidence and constant mortality rates of breast cancer: time trends in Stockholm County 1961-1973.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26838
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 1984;4(3):233-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
L E Rutqvist
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 1984;4(3):233-43
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Sweden
Abstract
This study describes trends in breast cancer incidence and survival in Stockholm County during 1961-1973. A discrepancy between increasing incidence and constant mortality rates was reflected in a significantly improved survival of the more recently treated patients. However, no change in survival was found when the patients were classified by axillary node status. The improvement thus seemed entirely the result of a more favorable stage distribution. The shift towards less advanced tumors was mainly caused by an increased age-standardized incidence of node-negative tumors, whereas the incidence of more advanced tumors seemed relatively unchanged. The survival from first distant metastasis was significantly increased; the use of combination chemotherapy might have contributed to this. The increase, however, was only moderate and did not seem to have contributed much to the improved overall survival. It is concluded that several confounding factors must be recognized when time trends in breast cancer are analyzed. A straightforward interpretation of observed changes is therefore not always possible. An increasing detection of tumors with relatively benign biological properties or lead time bias may well contribute to seemingly improved results.
PubMed ID
6487825 View in PubMed
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Mammography and the value of screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26551
Source
Br J Hosp Med. 1985 Nov;34(5):263
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1985

Population impact of heart failure and the most common forms of cancer: a study of 1 162 309 hospital cases in Sweden (1988 to 2004).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140259
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2010 Nov;3(6):573-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Simon Stewart
Inger Ekman
Tor Ekman
Anders Odén
Annika Rosengren
Author Affiliation
Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Australia.
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2010 Nov;3(6):573-80
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Cost of Illness
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - epidemiology - mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Sex Factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
The contemporary impact of heart failure (HF) versus the most common forms of cancer as reflected by related first-ever hospitalizations and subsequent case-fatality rates is unknown.
Using a national registry in Sweden, we compared the rate of first-ever hospitalization and associated short- and long-term survival for HF, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and the most common forms of cancer on an age and sex-specific basis during 1988 to 2004 in 949 733 Swedish patients (1 162 309 hospital admissions in total). Annual incidence of first-ever hospitalization for HF, AMI, and cancer in Sweden were 484, 424, and 373 (lung, colorectal, prostate, and bladder cancer combined) per 100 000 men and 470, 280, and 350 (lung, colorectal, bladder, breast, and ovarian cancer combined) per 100 000 women age >20 years. The ratio of individual cases of HF to cancer was 1.37:1 (465 998 versus 340 738). Despite improvements in 30-day and 5-year survival (adjusted 7% and 6% increase per calendar year for men and women, respectively), HF was associated with unadjusted case-fatality rate of 59% within 5 years and 196 400 deaths versus 58% and 131 000 deaths in patients with cancer. During 10-year follow-up, HF was associated with 66 318 versus 55 364 premature life-years lost than all common forms of cancer in men. In women, the equivalent figures were 59 535 versus 64 533 premature life-years lost.
These data confirm that, like most common forms of cancer combined, HF exerts a major health burden in respect to age-adjusted rates of first hospitalization, poor overall survival, and premature life-years lost.
PubMed ID
20923990 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.