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256 records – page 1 of 26.

131I ablation treatment in young females after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80419
Source
J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1723-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Travis Curtis C
Stabin Michael G
Author Affiliation
Science Applications International Corporation, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. Traviscc@icx.net
Source
J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1723-7
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Child
Female
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Power Plants
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Thyroid Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Ukraine
Whole-Body Counting
Abstract
The Chernobyl accident resulted in a number of cases of thyroid cancer in females under the age of 20 y. Many of these individuals were treated with surgical removal of the thyroid gland followed by 131I ablation of residual thyroid tissue. Epidemiologic evidence demonstrates that 131I treatment for thyroid cancer or hyperthyroidism in adult women confers negligible risk of breast cancer. However, comparable data for younger women do not exist. Studies of external radiation exposure indicate that, for radiation exposures of as low as 0.2-0.7 Gy, the risk of breast cancer is greater for infant and adolescent female breast tissues than for adult female breast tissues. METHODS: The effective half-time of 131I measured in athyrotic patients was used together with the OLINDA/EXM computer code to estimate doses to breast tissue in 10-y-old, 15-y-old, and young adult females from ablation treatment. RESULTS: The dose to pediatric and young adult female breast tissue associated with a 5.6-GBq (150 mCi) ablation treatment may range from 0.35 to 0.55 Gy, resulting in a lifetime risk of breast cancer ranging from 2-4 cases per 100 such individuals exposed and a lifetime risk of solid tumors ranging from 8 to 17 solid tumors per 100 such individuals exposed. Administration of multiple ablation treatments, as often occurs with metastases, could result in doses ranging from 0.7 to 1 Gy, with corresponding increases in the lifetime cancer risk. CONCLUSION: These estimates suggest the need for additional research and a possible need for surveillance of young Chernobyl thyroid cancer patients who received 131I ablation treatment.
Notes
Comment In: J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1563-417015887
Erratum In: J Nucl Med. 2007 Jan;48(1):7
PubMed ID
17015910 View in PubMed
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Abortion, breast cancer, and epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22237
Source
N Engl J Med. 1997 Jan 9;336(2):127-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-1997

Abortions and breast cancer: record-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18717
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Feb 20;103(5):676-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-2003
Author
Gunnar Erlandsson
Scott M Montgomery
Sven Cnattingius
Anders Ekbom
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Gunnar.Erlandsson@mep.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Feb 20;103(5):676-9
Date
Feb-20-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - adverse effects
Abortion, Spontaneous
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Medical Records
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
It has been suggested that abortions leave the breast epithelium in a proliferative state with an increased susceptibility to carcinogenesis. Results from previous studies of induced or spontaneous abortions and risk of subsequent breast cancer are contradictory, probably due to methodological considerations. We investigated the relationship between abortions and subsequent breast cancer risk in a case-control study using prospectively recorded exposure information. The study population comprised women recorded in the population-based Swedish Medical Birth Register between 1973-91. Cases were defined by linkage of the birth register to the Swedish Cancer Register and controls were randomly selected from the birth register. From the subjects' antenatal care records we abstracted prospectively collected information on induced and spontaneous abortions, as well as a number of potential confounding factors. Relative risk of breast cancer was estimated by odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). A reduced risk of breast cancer was observed for women with a history of at least 1 compared to no abortions (adjusted OR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.72-0.99). The adjusted OR decreases step-wise with number of abortions to 0.59 (95% CI = 0.34-1.03) for 3 or more compared to no abortions. The patterns are similar for induced and spontaneous abortions. In conclusion, neither a history of induced nor spontaneous abortions is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Our data suggest a protective effect of pregnancies regardless of outcome.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2004 May 10;109(6):945-6; author reply 947-815027130
PubMed ID
12494478 View in PubMed
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Active smoking and secondhand smoke increase breast cancer risk: the report of the Canadian Expert Panel on Tobacco Smoke and Breast Cancer Risk (2009).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138696
Source
Tob Control. 2011 Jan;20(1):e2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Kenneth C Johnson
Anthony B Miller
Neil E Collishaw
Julie R Palmer
S Katharine Hammond
Andrew G Salmon
Kenneth P Cantor
Mark D Miller
Norman F Boyd
John Millar
Fernand Turcotte
Author Affiliation
Science Integration Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, 785 Carling Avenue, Ottawa K1A0K9, Canada. ken_lcdc_johnson@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Tob Control. 2011 Jan;20(1):e2
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetyltransferases - genetics
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens
Female
Humans
Organizations
Premenopause
Public Health
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
Four authoritative reviews of active smoking and breast cancer have been published since 2000, but only one considered data after 2002 and conclusions varied. Three reviews of secondhand smoke (SHS) and breast cancer (2004-2006) each came to different conclusions. With 30 new studies since 2002, further review was deemed desirable. An Expert Panel was convened by four Canadian agencies, the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Physicians for a Smoke-Free Canada and the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer to comprehensively examine the weight of evidence from epidemiological and toxicological studies and understanding of biological mechanisms regarding the relationship between tobacco smoke and breast cancer. This article summarises the panel's full report (http://www.otru.org/pdf/special/expert_panel_tobacco_breast_cancer.pdf). There are 20 known or suspected mammary carcinogens in tobacco smoke, and recognised biological mechanisms that explain how exposure to these carcinogens could lead to breast cancer. Results from the nine cohort studies reporting exposure metrics more detailed than ever/never and ex/current smoker show that early age of smoking commencement, higher pack-years and longer duration of smoking increase breast cancer risk 15% to 40%. Three meta-analyses report 35% to 50% increases in breast cancer risk for long-term smokers with N-acetyltransferase 2 gene (NAT2) slow acetylation genotypes. The active smoking evidence bolsters support for three meta-analyses that each reported about a 65% increase in premenopausal breast cancer risk among never smokers exposed to SHS. The Panel concluded that: 1) the association between active smoking and breast cancer is consistent with causality and 2) the association between SHS and breast cancer among younger, primarily premenopausal women who have never smoked is consistent with causality.
PubMed ID
21148114 View in PubMed
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Adult height and risk of breast cancer: a possible effect of early nutrition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19525
Source
Br J Cancer. 2001 Sep 28;85(7):959-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-28-2001
Author
T I Nilsen
L J Vatten
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, University Medical Centre, N-7489 Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2001 Sep 28;85(7):959-61
Date
Sep-28-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body Height
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child Welfare
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
The relationship of breast cancer to early reproductive development and height suggests that fetal and childhood nutrition may be important in its aetiology. Caloric restriction sufficient to reduce adult height may reduce breast cancer risk. During World War II (WWII) there was a marked reduction in average caloric intake in Norway that resulted in greater nutritional diversity. We hypothesized that a positive association between height and risk of breast cancer would be stronger among women who were born during this period than among women born before or after the war. A total of 25 204 Norwegian women were followed up for approximately 11 years, and 215 incident cases of breast cancer were registered. We found the strongest positive association between height and breast cancer among women born during WWII: women in the tallest tertile (>167 cm) had a relative risk of 2.5 (95% confidence interval = 1.2-5.5) compared with the shortest (
PubMed ID
11592765 View in PubMed
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Age at first birth, parity and risk of breast cancer in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27271
Source
Br J Cancer. 1980 Nov;42(5):651-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980
Author
H O Adami
J. Hansen
B. Jung
A J Rimsten
Source
Br J Cancer. 1980 Nov;42(5):651-8
Date
Nov-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Parity
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
A case-control study was conducted over a period of 11 months in an area containing one-third of the Swedish population. One thousand and one patients participated, constituting 94% of all women newly diagnosed as having breast cancer within the area. They were compared with 1,001 age-matched, non-hospitalized controls without breast cancer, selected by paired sampling from a population register. The risk of breast cancer was slightly, but significantly, related to parity, the standardized relative risk (SRR) being 1.35 for nulliparous women as compared to ever parous. In the different parity groups a risk significantly lower than that for nulliparous women was found only for women with more than 2 children (SRR = 0.59) but the trend with parity was highly significant (P less than 0.001). Age at first birth was not found to be an important risk factor for breast cancer. SRR was lower than for nulliparous women in all groups of women with their first birth before the age of 35 years, but the difference was significant (P less than 0.05) only for those with the first birth between 20 and 24 (SSR = 0.69) and 25 and 29 (SRR = 0.69) years of age. The trend with age at first birth (P less than 0.05) disappeared after stratification for parity, suggesting that it was a confounding factor.
PubMed ID
7459205 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and breast cancer risk: the alcoholism paradox.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10389
Source
Br J Cancer. 2000 Oct;83(7):949-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
H. Kuper
W. Ye
E. Weiderpass
A. Ekbom
D. Trichopoulos
O. Nyrén
H O Adami
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Harvard Center for Cancer Prevention, Harvard University, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2000 Oct;83(7):949-51
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A population-based cohort study of 36 856 women diagnosed with alcoholism in Sweden between 1965 and 1995 found that alcoholic women had only a small 15% increase in breast-cancer incidence compared to the general female population. It is therefore apparent, contrary to expectation, that alcoholism does not increase breast-cancer risk in proportion to presumed ethanol intake.
PubMed ID
10970699 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol, breast cancer and causal inference in epidemiology]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10956
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 30;117(26):3771-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1997
Author
K. Kjaerheim
Author Affiliation
Institutt for epidemiologisk kreftforskning, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 30;117(26):3771-6
Date
Oct-30-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Causality
Clinical Trials
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Meta-Analysis
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
In order to demonstrate how possible causal relationships are critically evaluated in epidemiologic research, literature on the association between alcohol and breast cancer is reviewed and discussed. A cause can be defined as a factor which, in combination with other factors, known and unknown, is sufficient to produce an effect. Since the hypothesis-generating study was published in 1977, a total of 34 positive and 16 negative studies have been published. Methodological problems, such as chance, bias and confounding, cannot be considered as plausible explanations for the above majority of positive findings. The question of causality was then evaluated using the guidelines developed by Bradford Hill in 1965. Among these, the strength of the association, consistency, temporality, biological gradient and biological plausibility, are the most important. In spite of the relatively weak association and somewhat inconsistent results, it is concluded that alcohol consumption should be considered as a cause of breast cancer. It is estimated that in Norway, between 24 and 180 cases of breast cancer may be attributed to alcohol consumption. Future research should focus on the question of effect-modification and on the possible implications of different patterns of alcohol consumption.
PubMed ID
9417679 View in PubMed
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Alcohol, cigarette smoking, and the risk of breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11461
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 1995;19(6):487-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
J. Ranstam
H. Olsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Lund University, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 1995;19(6):487-93
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Parity
Population Surveillance
Postmenopause
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A case-control study of 177 premenopausal and 216 postmenopausal breast cancer patients diagnosed in the southern Swedish Health Care Region between 1981 and 1984, and 195 premenopausal and 254 postmenopausal controls randomly chosen during 1984 from the same population by means of a computerized population register was used to estimate the relations among alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and the risk of cancer. Cigarette smoking did not seem to be related to the risk for breast cancer among pre- or postmenopausal women. Beer consumption did not show any consistent relation to the risk of breast cancer. An occasional (less frequent than once a week) or a weekly consumption of wine and spirits appeared to be protective compared with abstaining (RRadj = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.3-0.7 for weekly wine consumption, and RRadj = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.4-0.9 for occasional consumption of spirits) among postmenopausal but not among premenopausal women (RRadj = 0.8, 95% CI = 0.7-2.3 and RRadj = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.7-1.8 respectively). The risk estimates were adjusted for differences between cases and controls in age at menarche, age at first full-term pregnancy, age at diagnosis, smoking, and use of exogenous hormones, and for postmenopausal women, age at menopause. The study was based on observations of women with a relatively low exposure to cigarette smoking and alcohol. More frequent exposure or exposure to greater quantities of alcohol and smoking may exhibit different relationships with breast cancer risk.
PubMed ID
8925517 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12015
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1991 Jul;2(4):247-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1991
Author
M. Ewertz
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1991 Jul;2(4):247-52
Date
Jul-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
The influence of alcohol consumption on breast cancer risk was evaluated in a population-based case-control study, including 1,486 cases diagnosed over a one-year (1983-84) period in Denmark. Cases were identified from the files of the nationwide clinical trial of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group and the Danish Cancer Registry. The control group was an age-stratified random sample of 1,336 women from the general population. Data on risk factors were collected by self-administered questionnaires. The association of alcohol consumption with breast cancer risk varied with age and dietary fat intake. Among women aged 50-59 years, with a fat intake in the lowest quartile, the risk of breast cancer increased with increasing consumption of alcohol. A consumption of 24 g or more per day was associated with an 18-fold increased risk compared with abstainers. For women in other age groups, alcohol consumption had no significant association with breast cancer risk.
PubMed ID
1873455 View in PubMed
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256 records – page 1 of 26.