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Breast cancer screening in Canada: a review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169969
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2005 Dec;56(5):271-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Nancy Wadden
Gregory P Doyle
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Clare's Mercy Hospital, St. John's, NL.
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2005 Dec;56(5):271-5
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control - radiography
Canada
Carcinoma in Situ - diagnosis - radiography
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast - diagnosis - radiography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Mammography - utilization
Mass Screening - organization & administration - standards
Middle Aged
Physical Examination
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Program Evaluation
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Time Factors
Abstract
Organized screening for breast cancer in Canada began in 1988 and has been implemented in all provinces and 2 of the 3 territories. Quality initiatives are promoted through national guidelines which detail best practices in various areas, including achieving quality through a client-service approach, recruitment and capacity, retention, quality of mammography, reporting, communication of results, follow-up and diagnostic workup, and program evaluation; it also offers detailed guidelines for the pathological examination and reporting of breast specimens. The Canadian Breast Cancer Data Base is a national breast cancer screening surveillance system whose objective is to collect information from provincial-screening programs. These data are used to monitor and evaluate the performance of programs and allow comparison with national and international results. A series of standardized performance indicators and targets for the evaluation of performance and quality of organized breast cancer screening programs have been developed from the data base. Although health care is a provincial responsibility in Canada, the collective reporting and comparison of results both nationally and internationally is beneficial in evaluating and refining both screening programs and individual radiologist performance. The results of Canadian performance indicators compare favourably with those of other well-established international screening programs. There are variations in performance indicators across the provinces and territories, but these differences are not extreme.
Notes
Comment In: Can Assoc Radiol J. 2006 Jun;57(3):192-316881479
Erratum In: Can Assoc Radiol J. 2006 Apr;57(2):67Doyle, Gregory P [added]
PubMed ID
16579020 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer screening practices for women aged 35 to 49 and 70 and older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127753
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2012 Jan;58(1):e47-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Nabila Kadaoui
Maryse Guay
Geneviève Baron
José St-Cerny
Jacques Lemaire
Author Affiliation
Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. Nabila.kadaoui@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2012 Jan;58(1):e47-53
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control - radiography
Canada
Early Detection of Cancer - statistics & numerical data
Female
General practitioners
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Mammography - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Abstract
To describe physician practices with regard to opportunistic screening for breast cancer in women aged 35 to 49 years and 70 years of age and older, and to identify the determinants associated with the practice of prescribing screening mammography.
Postal survey.
Quebec.
Simple random sample of 1400 general practitioners practising in Quebec in 2009.
Five cancer screening practices among 4 types of female clientele and the factors influencing physicians in their practice of prescribing screening mammography.
The response rate was 36%. For women aged 35 to 49 years, more than 80% of physicians reported using practices judged adequate, except for the teaching of breast self-examination and referrals to genetic counseling (60% and 54%). For women 70 years of age and older with good life expectancy, only 50% of general practitioners prescribed screening mammography. For the 70 years of age and older age group without good life expectancy, for whom screening is not indicated, nearly half of physicians continued to do the clinical breast examination and more than one-third reviewed family history. The main determinants for the practice of prescribing mammography are a favourable attitude to screening, screening skills, peer support, belief in the efficacy of mammography, and sufficient knowledge of the issue and of recommendations.
Improvements are needed in the practice of teaching breast self-examination to women aged 35 to 49 years and referring them to genetic counseling, as well as in prescribing mammography for women 70 years of age and older who are in good health. Public health actions to improve these practices should focus on physician attitudes and skills and on communicating clearer recommendations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22267639 View in PubMed
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The Canadian National Breast Screening Study: a clinician's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222738
Source
CMAJ. 1992 Nov 15;147(10):1437-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1992
Author
A A Starreveld
Source
CMAJ. 1992 Nov 15;147(10):1437-9
Date
Nov-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control - radiography
Canada
Female
Humans
Mammography
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Physical Examination
Survival Rate
Notes
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Comment On: CMAJ. 1992 Nov 15;147(10):1477-881423088
Comment On: CMAJ. 1992 Nov 15;147(10):1459-761423087
PubMed ID
1423084 View in PubMed
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The Canadian National Breast Screening Study: opportunity for a rethink.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222740
Source
CMAJ. 1992 Nov 15;147(10):1431-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1992
Author
A S Basinski
Source
CMAJ. 1992 Nov 15;147(10):1431-4
Date
Nov-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biopsy
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control - radiography
Breast Self-Examination
Canada
Female
Humans
Mammography
Mass Screening - trends
Middle Aged
Physical Examination
Sensitivity and specificity
Survival Rate
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 1993 May 15;148(10):1670-28485663
Comment On: CMAJ. 1992 Nov 15;147(10):1477-881423088
Comment On: CMAJ. 1992 Nov 15;147(10):1459-761423087
PubMed ID
1307231 View in PubMed
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Canadian recommendations for screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224437
Source
AARN News Lett. 1992 Feb;48(2):27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992

Contribution of clinical breast examination to mammography screening in the early detection of breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185075
Source
J Med Screen. 2003;10(1):16-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
C. Bancej
K. Decker
A. Chiarelli
M. Harrison
D. Turner
J. Brisson
Author Affiliation
Screening and Early Detection, Chronic Disease Prevention Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Health Canada.
Source
J Med Screen. 2003;10(1):16-21
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control - radiography
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Mammography - standards
Mass Screening - methods
Palpation - methods - standards
Posture
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
As the benefit of clinical breast examination (CBE) over that of screening mammography alone in reducing breast cancer mortality is uncertain, it is informative to monitor its contribution to interim measures of effectiveness of a screening programme. Here, the contribution of CBE to screening mammography in the early detection of breast cancer was evaluated.
Four Canadian organised breast cancer screening programmes.
Women aged 50-69 receiving dual screening (CBE and mammography) (n = 300,303) between 1996 and 1998 were followed up between screen and diagnosis. Outcomes assessed by mode of detection (CBE alone, mammography alone, or both CBE and mammography) included referral rate, positive predictive value, pathological features of tumours (size, nodal status, morphology), and cancer detection rates overall and for small cancers (
PubMed ID
12790311 View in PubMed
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Lightscanning versus mammography for the detection of breast cancer in screening and clinical practice. A Swedish multicenter study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25218
Source
Cancer. 1990 Apr 15;65(8):1671-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1990
Author
A. Alveryd
I. Andersson
K. Aspegren
G. Balldin
N. Bjurstam
G. Edström
G. Fagerberg
U. Glas
O. Jarlman
S A Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, County Hospital Falun.
Source
Cancer. 1990 Apr 15;65(8):1671-7
Date
Apr-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biopsy, Needle
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control - radiography
Carcinoma - diagnosis - prevention & control - radiography
Carcinoma in Situ - diagnosis - prevention & control - radiography
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Mammography
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Transillumination
Abstract
State of the art lightscanning of the breast was tested against mammography in 2568 women in a Swedish multicenter study. The study was in two parts. One was in women with symptoms from the breasts (the clinical study) comprising 3178 examined breasts with 198 cancers; the other in asymptomatic women (the screening study) comprising 1909 examined breasts with 126 cancers. In women with symptoms from the breasts, lightscanning did not contribute to clinical examination and mammography. In the screening situation, it was poor to pick up small cancers. Mammography alone falsely diagnosed cancer in 6.9% of the patients whereas lightscan falsely diagnosed cancer in 19.1%. Lightscan was not better than mammography in young women. The study shows that lightscanning in its current form is inferior to standard mammography.
PubMed ID
2180556 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.