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American Indians and Alaska Natives in California: women's cancer screening and results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3869
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(1 Suppl):58-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Delight E Satter
Brenda F Seals
Y Jenny Chia
Melissa Gatchell
Linda Burhansstipanov
Author Affiliation
UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA. delight@ucla.edu
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(1 Suppl):58-64
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - prevention & control
California
Comparative Study
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Mammography - utilization
Mass Screening - utilization
Middle Aged
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears - utilization
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND METHODS: The purpose of this article was to examine differences in demographics, general health status, and utilization of breast and cervical cancer screening for subgroups of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIAN) using the 2001 California Health Interview Survey. RESULTS: The statewide distribution of California American Indians, non-California AIANs, and unknown AIANs are 10%, 51%, and 39%, respectively. Significant differences exist among the 3 tribal subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, AIAN women aged 40+ years are close to the Healthy People 2010 goals for receipt of a mammogram in the past 2 years and for receipt of a Pap test ever and in the past 3 years. Less than 5% of AIAN in California report Indian Health Service coverage.
PubMed ID
15916523 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer and screening information needs and preferred communication medium among Iranian immigrant women in Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134356
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2011 Nov;19(6):626-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Mandana Vahabi
Author Affiliation
Ryerson University, Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mvahabi@ryerson.ca
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2011 Nov;19(6):626-35
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology
Consumer Health Information - methods
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Iran - ethnology
Middle Aged
Ontario
Women
Abstract
Few studies have investigated what information women from minority immigrant groups need about breast cancer and screening. Nor has much research been conducted about how such women would prefer to receive this information. Mere translation of breast cancer and screening information from generic materials, without considering and respecting women's unique historical, political, and cultural experiences, is insufficient. This study explored breast cancer and screening information needs and preferred methods of communication among Iranian immigrant women. A convenience sample of 50 women was recruited and interviewed over a 4-month period (June-September 2008); all resided in Toronto Canada, and had no history of breast cancer. Tape-recorded interviews were transcribed and analysed using a thematic analysis technique. While generic breast health communication focusing on physiological risk information meets some of the needs of Iranian immigrant women, results showed that the needs of this group go beyond this basic information. This group is influenced by historical, sociopolitical, and cultural experiences pre- and post-immigration. Their experiences with chemical war, unsafe physical environment (air and water pollution), and their sociopolitical situation appear to have limited their access to accurate and reliable breast cancer and screening information in their homeland. Moreover, the behavioural and psychosocial changes they face after immigration appear to have a strong influence on their breast cancer and screening information needs. Considering their limited time due to their multiple demands post-migration, multi-media methods were highly preferred as a communication means by this group. The results of this study can be used to guide the design and implementation of culturally sensitive breast health information. For instance, video presentations conducted by a trusted Iranian healthcare professional focusing on socioculturally relevant breast cancer risk factors, symptoms, and screening methods, as well as a list of available breast health resources, could improve Iranian women's knowledge and uptake of breast health practices.
PubMed ID
21595770 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer screening among Asian immigrant women in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146338
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2010 Feb;34(1):73-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Zhuoyu Sun
Hui Xiong
Anne Kearney
Jin Zhang
Wei Liu
Guowei Huang
Peizhong Peter Wang
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada; Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2010 Feb;34(1):73-8
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology
Canada - ethnology
Early Detection of Cancer - statistics & numerical data - trends
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Mammography - statistics & numerical data - trends
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine the pattern of breast cancer screening among Asian immigrant women aged 50-69 years and compare it with corresponding non-immigrant women in Canada.
Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey cycle 2.1 (2003) were utilized. Self-reported screening histories were used as outcome variables: socioeconomic status and medical histories were used as predictive variables. Analyses were weighted to represent the target population. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to compare the screening pattern among Asian immigrant women and corresponding non-immigrant Canadians.
In total, 508 Asian immigrant women were included in this study. The results suggest that 71% and 60% of Asian immigrant women reported ever having had and recent mammogram use, respectively, while the corresponding figures for non-immigrant women were 89% and 72%. The observed differences were statistically significant and could not be explained by confounding factors. The ability to speak one of the two official languages is an important barrier to mammography screening among Asian immigrant women.
The findings show lower rates of mammography screening among Asian immigrant women in Canada. If breast screening is to remain a health policy objective in Canada, targeted efforts to increase the recruitment of Asian immigrant women need to be developed or strengthened.
PubMed ID
20044321 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer screening practices and correlates among American Indian and Alaska native women in California, 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97787
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2010 Mar-Apr;20(2):139-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jan M Eberth
John Charles Huber
Antonio Rene
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health, Houston, TX 77098, USA. Jan.M.Eberth@uth.tmc.edu
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2010 Mar-Apr;20(2):139-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology
California - epidemiology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Mammography
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Breast cancer incidence and mortality have been increasing among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women, and their survival rate is the lowest of all racial/ethnic groups. Nevertheless, knowledge of AI/AN women's breast cancer screening practices and their correlates is limited. METHODS: Using the 2003 California Health Interview Survey, we 1) compared the breast cancer screening practices of AI/AN women to other groups and 2) explored the association of several factors known or thought to influence AI/AN women's breast cancer screening practices. FINDINGS: Compared with other races, AI/AN women had the lowest rate of mammogram screening (ever and within the past 2 years). For clinical breast examination receipt, Asian women had the lowest rate, followed by AI/AN women. Factors associated with AI/AN women's breast cancer screening practices included older age, having a high school diploma or some college education, receipt of a Pap test within the past 3 years, and having visited a doctor within the past year. CONCLUSION: Significant differences in breast cancer screening practices were noted between races, with AI/AN women often having significantly lower rates. Integrating these epidemiologic findings into effective policy and practice requires additional applied research initiatives.
PubMed ID
20211430 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer treatment and ethnicity in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144089
Source
BMC Cancer. 2010;10:154
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Parvin Yavari
Maria Cristina Barroetavena
T Greg Hislop
Chris D Bajdik
Author Affiliation
BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
BMC Cancer. 2010;10:154
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal - therapeutic use
Asia - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - therapy
British Columbia - epidemiology
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant - statistics & numerical data
Chi-Square Distribution
China - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Iran - ethnology
Logistic Models
Mastectomy - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Racial and ethnic disparities in breast cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis, survival and mortality are well documented; but few studies have reported on disparities in breast cancer treatment. This paper compares the treatment received by breast cancer patients in British Columbia (BC) for three ethnic groups and three time periods. Values for breast cancer treatments received in the BC general population are provided for reference.
Information on patients, tumour characteristics and treatment was obtained from BC Cancer Registry (BCCR) and BC Cancer Agency (BCCA) records. Treatment among ethnic groups was analyzed by stage at diagnosis and time period at diagnosis. Differences among the three ethnic groups were tested using chi-square tests, Fisher exact tests and a multivariate logistic model.
There was no significant difference in overall surgery use for stage I and II disease between the ethnic groups, however there were significant differences when surgery with and without radiation were considered separately. These differences did not change significantly with time. Treatment with chemotherapy and hormone therapy did not differ among the minority groups.
The description of treatment differences is the first step to guiding interventions that reduce ethnic disparities. Specific studies need to examine reasons for the observed differences and the influence of culture and beliefs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20406489 View in PubMed
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Breast health information needs of women from minority ethnic groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178831
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2004 Sep;47(5):526-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Tessa Watts
Joy Merrell
Fiona Murphy
Angela Williams
Author Affiliation
School of Health Science, University of Wales Swansea, Swansea, Wales, UK. t.watts@swansea.ac.uk
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2004 Sep;47(5):526-35
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology
Cultural Diversity
Decision Making
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Mass Screening
Minority Groups - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Patient compliance
Patient Education as Topic
Abstract
For women from minority ethnic groups to make informed decisions about their health, and particularly about whether to participate in breast cancer screening programmes, access to a range of appropriately designed high quality, culturally-specific and sensitive health information is needed.
Through a critical review of the literature, this paper aims to determine the breast health and breast cancer screening information needs of women from minority ethnic groups and to discuss the implications of cultural difference for nurses in relation to the development and dissemination of health information.
A critical review of the research literature published in English between 1996 and 2002 was conducted. Electronic and the relevant Cochrane Collaboration databases were searched using a range of search terms to retrieve literature specifically relevant to the aims of the review. The use of personal contacts and posting a request for information on the mailing list at minority-ethnic-health@jiscmail.ac.uk facilitated the retrieval of grey literature. All references retrieved were entered on a bibliographic database. The title and abstract of each was examined to assess it for inclusion in the review.
There was little published information about specific breast cancer screening information needs from the perspective of women from minority ethnic groups. In comparison with the indigenous population, the information needs of people from minority ethnic groups differ in relation to their cultural beliefs and values and the effects of these on health care practices. Inadequate knowledge about breast health and breast cancer screening may be a consequence of the provision of insufficient or culturally inappropriate information.
There is a dearth of research highlighting breast health and breast cancer screening information needs of women from minority ethnic groups. In providing information, their needs appear to have been an 'add on'. Health care professionals' lack of understanding about cultural beliefs, values and knowledge, together with racial stereotyping and misconceptions about cancer in minority ethnic groups, pose challenges to information dissemination. Health care professionals need to work collaboratively with women from minority ethnic groups, identifying culturally-specific beliefs and values about breast cancer, breast cancer risk and screening, in order to develop appropriate and acceptable information and dissemination strategies.
PubMed ID
15312115 View in PubMed
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Cancer survival among US whites and minorities: a SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) Program population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3926
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2002 Sep 23;162(17):1985-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-23-2002
Author
Limin X Clegg
Frederick P Li
Benjamin F Hankey
Kenneth Chu
Brenda K Edwards
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 6116 Executive Blvd, MSC 8316, Suite 504, Bethesda, MD 20892-8316, USA. lin_clegg@nih.gov
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2002 Sep 23;162(17):1985-93
Date
Sep-23-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - mortality
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - mortality
Comparative Study
European Continental Ancestry Group
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups
Neoplasm Staging
Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - mortality
Prostatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Survival Analysis
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Available cancer statistics pertain primarily to white and African American populations. This study describes racial or ethnic patterns of cancer-specific survival and relative risks (RRs) of cancer death for all cancers combined and for cancers of the colon and rectum, lung and bronchus, prostate, and female breast for the 6 major US racial or ethnic groups. METHODS: Cancer-specific survival rates were analyzed for more than 1.78 million patients who resided in the 9 SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) Program geographic areas and were diagnosed between 1975 and 1997 as having an incident invasive cancer, by 6 racial or ethnic groups (non-Hispanic whites, Hispanic whites, African Americans, Asian Americans, Hawaiian natives, and American Indians and Alaskan natives). RESULTS: Survival rates improved between 1988 to 1997 for virtually all racial or ethnic groups. However, racial or ethnic differences in RRs of cancer death persisted after controlling for age for all cancers combined and for age and stage for specific cancer sites (P
Notes
Comment In: Arch Intern Med. 2003 Mar 10;163(5):631-2; author reply 63212622614
PubMed ID
12230422 View in PubMed
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Diet, lifestyle and BRCA-related breast cancer risk among French-Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170236
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2006 Aug;98(3):285-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
A. Nkondjock
A. Robidoux
Y. Paredes
S A Narod
P. Ghadirian
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Research Unit, Research Centre, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM) - Hôtel-Dieu, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. andre.nkondjock@netzero.net
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2006 Aug;98(3):285-94
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - genetics - pathology
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Diet
Female
Genes, BRCA1
Genes, BRCA2
Humans
Life Style
Mutation
Odds Ratio
Risk
Risk factors
Abstract
Although the connection between diet, lifestyle and hormones suggests that nutritional and lifestyle factors may exert an influence in the etiology of breast cancer (BC), it is not clear whether these factors operate in the same way in women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) gene mutations who already have an elevated BC risk.
A case-control study was conducted within a cohort of 80 French-Canadian families with 250 members involving 89 carriers of mutated BRCA gene affected with BC and 48 non-affected carriers. A validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire was used to ascertain dietary intake, and a lifestyle core questionnaire, to gather information on physical activity and other lifestyle risk factors. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated in unconditional logistic regression models.
After adjustment for age, maximum lifetime body mass index (BMI) and physical activity, a positive association was found between total energy intake and BRCA-related BC risk. OR was 2.76 (95%CI: 1.10-7.02; p=0.026 for trend), when comparing the highest tertile of intake with the lowest. The intake of other nutrients and dietary components was not significantly associated with the risk of BC. Age at the time the subjects reached maximum BMI was significantly related to an elevated BC risk (OR=2.90; 95%CI: 1.01-8.36; p=0.046 for trend). In addition, a direct and significant relationship was noted between maximum weight gain since both age 18 and 30 years and BC risk. The ORs were 4.64 (95%CI: 1.52-14.12; p=0.011 for trend) for weight gain since age 18 years and 4.11 (95%CI: 1.46-11.56; p=0.013 for trend) for weight gain since age 30 years, respectively. No overall association was apparent between BRCA-related BC risk and BMI, smoking, and physical activity.
The results of this preliminary study suggest that weight control in adulthood through dietary energy intake restriction is an important factor for the prevention of BRCA-related BC risk.
PubMed ID
16541324 View in PubMed
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Does breast cancer associated with CHEK2 1100delC carry characteristics of basal phenotype?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166893
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2007 Jul;103(3):371
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007

[Ethnic aspects of hereditary breast cancer in the region of Siberia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263906
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2014;(11-12):72-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
N V Cherdyntseva
L F Pisareva
A A Ivanova
Ye V Panferova
E A Malinovskaya
I N Odintsova
A V Doroshenko
P A Gervas
E M Slonimskaya
A A Shivit-ool
V V Dvornichenko
Ye L Choinzonov
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2014;(11-12):72-9
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
BRCA1 Protein - genetics
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - genetics
Female
Genes, BRCA1
Genes, BRCA2
Genetic Testing - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
Mutation
Population Groups - genetics
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
Ethnic diversity of the population in the region of Siberia suggests the existence of different germline mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes associated with breast and ovarian cancer in different ethnic populations, but spectrum of these mutations has not been studied.
Our aim was to evaluate the frequency of the most common mutations BRCA1/2 (BRCA1 5382insC, BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA1 4153delAG, BRCAI T300G, BRCA2 6174delT) in women diagnosed with breast cancer among indigenous people and newcomers living in Siberia.
We tested 1281 genomic DNA samples for the presence of BRCA1 5382insC mutation in patients diagnosed with breast cancer considering no family history. 72 patients having hereditary cancer signs were tested for the mutations BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA1 4153delAG, BRCA1 T300G, BRCA2 6174delT.
Out of 765 patients of Slavic ethnic group, 27 women (3.5%) were carriers of allele BRCA1 5382insC. The frequencies of mutations in patients with signs of hereditary cancer were: 8.3% in group of young patients (under 40 years), 20.0% in patients with bilateral cancer and 5.7% in patients with family history of breast or ovarian cancers. We tested 516 BC patients residing on the territory of the Buryat-Aginsky district, Republics of Tyva and Altai. Out of them, there were 197 patients among the indigenous population (buryats, tuvinians, altaians), and 319 patients among newcomers (Slavic ethnics). Mutations BRCA1 5382insC were detected only in women from Slavic ethnic groups. The frequency of BRCA1 5382insC mutation was 6% in the group where family history was excluded and 14% in the group of patients with characteristics of family cancer. Allele BRCA1 5382insC was not found in indigenous breast cancer patients, although 59 patients had signs of hereditary cancer. In women from Slavic ethnic group, the BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA1 4153delAG and BRCA1 T300G mutations were detected in 9.1% of cases and were not found in patients among the indigenous population.
studies of mutations in the BRCA1 gene in breast cancer patients from Siberia confirmed data on the high frequency of "founder mutation" BRCA1 5382insC in Slavic population and indicate the advisability of further studies to identify the genes responsible for the occurrence of hereditary breast cancer in the indigenous population.
PubMed ID
25971130 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.