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13 records – page 1 of 2.

[An analysis of the visits of breast cancer patients for medical care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225131
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1992;38(1):75-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
E A Mikhailov
V N Sagaidak
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1992;38(1):75-80
Date
1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Breast Self-Examination - statistics & numerical data
Diagnostic Errors
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Moscow - epidemiology
Office Visits - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Time Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
One-hundred and three breast cancer patients were questioned. As few as 35% of them had been regularly checked-up. 52% of patients took medical advice immediately after tumor detection. In 25% of patients, the period between the first examination and referral to a hospital was longer than 1 month whereas 59.2% of patients waited for 1 month to be hospitalized. Inadequate and prolonged examination and malpractice accounted for delayed diagnosis of breast cancer in 64.2%.
PubMed ID
1300691 View in PubMed
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Attending the breast screening programme after breast cancer treatment: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106990
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2013 Dec;37(6):968-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Linda de Munck
Annemiek Kwast
Dick Reiding
Geertruida H de Bock
Renée Otter
Pax H B Willemse
Sabine Siesling
Author Affiliation
Department of Research, Comprehensive Cancer Centre the Netherlands, P.O. Box 19079, 3501 DB Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: l.demunck@iknl.nl.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2013 Dec;37(6):968-72
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Canada - epidemiology
Early Detection of Cancer - utilization
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Mammography - utilization
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Patient Participation
Prognosis
Program Evaluation
Abstract
In the Netherlands, breast cancer patients are treated and followed at least 5 years after diagnosis. Furthermore, all women aged 50-74 are invited biennially for mammography by the nationwide screening programme. The relation between the outpatient follow-up (follow-up visits in the outpatient clinic for 5 years after treatment) and the screening programme is not well established and attending the screening programme as well as outpatient follow-up is considered undesirable. This study evaluates potential factors influencing women to attend the screening programme during their outpatient follow-up (overlap) and the (re-)attendance to the screening programme after 5 years of outpatient follow-up.
Data of breast cancer patients aged 50-74 years, treated for primary breast cancer between 1996 and 2007 were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry and linked to the National Breast Cancer Screening Programme in the Northern region. Cox regression analyses were used to study women (re-)attending the screening programme over time, possible overlap with the outpatient follow-up and factors influencing this.
In total 11227 breast cancer patients were included, of whom 19% attended the screening programme after breast cancer treatment, 4.4% within 5 years and 15.4% after more than 5 years. Factors that independently influenced attendance within 5 years as well as more than 5 years after treatment were: interval tumours (HR 0.77; 95%CI 0.61-0.97 and HR 0.69; 95%CI 0.53-0.88, ref: screen-detected tumours), receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (HR 0.65; 95%CI 0.47-0.90 and HR 0.66; 95%CI 0.47-0.93; ref: none) and diagnosis of in situ tumours (HR 1.67; 95%CI 1.25-2.23 and HR 1.39; 95%CI 1.05-1.85; ref: stage I tumours). Non-screen related tumours (HR 0.41; 95%CI 0.29-0.58) and recent diagnosis (HR 0.89 per year; 95%CI 0.86-0.92) were only associated with attendance within 5 years after treatment.
The interrelation between outpatient follow-up and screening should be improved to avoid overlap and low attendance to the screening programme after outpatient follow-up. Breast cancer patients should be informed that attending the screening programme during the outpatient follow-up is not necessary.
PubMed ID
24075800 View in PubMed
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[Breast cancer is the most frequently found cancer in women]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24896
Source
Vardfacket. 1991 Feb 7;15(3):II-VI
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-1991

Change in working time in a population-based cohort of patients with breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122750
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2012 Aug 10;30(23):2853-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2012
Author
Marie Høyer
Karin Nordin
Johan Ahlgren
Leif Bergkvist
Mats Lambe
Birgitta Johansson
Claudia Lampic
Author Affiliation
Regional Cancer Center, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. marie.hoyer@pubcare.uu.se
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2012 Aug 10;30(23):2853-60
Date
Aug-10-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Cohort Studies
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Registries
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
We examined changes in working time 16 months after a breast cancer diagnosis and identified factors associated with job discontinuation and/or decreased working time.
This was a population-based cohort study with 735 patients identified in the Regional Breast Cancer Quality Register of Central Sweden. The study sample consisted of 505 women (age
PubMed ID
22778312 View in PubMed
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[Clinical aspects and treatment of "minimal" forms of breast cancer].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242555
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1983;29(5):28-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
V F Semiglazov
A A Orlov
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1983;29(5):28-33
Date
1983
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Carcinoma in Situ - diagnosis - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology
Precancerous Conditions - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Russia
Terminology as Topic
Urban Population
Abstract
The data on 262 patients with minimal breast cancer (less than 1 cm in diameter) are presented. The long-term results of treatment of this group were good: 5- and 10-year survival rates were 91.2 and 79.5%, respectively. However, minimal breast cancer tended to produce regional (28.5%) and distant (10.3%) metastases. Organ-saving operation, viz. lumpectomy en bloc with axillary-subclavian adipose tissue was frequently (18.5%) followed by local and regional recurrence development. Adjuvant thiotepa therapy caused a 17.8% decrease in the frequency of recurrence and distant metastases development.
PubMed ID
6305033 View in PubMed
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[Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119711
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Oct 15;174(42):2532
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2012

Incidence of right-sided colorectal cancer after breast cancer: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151880
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2009 May;104(5):1213-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
L Y L Tang
Z. Nugent
A A Demers
Harminder Singh
Author Affiliation
Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2009 May;104(5):1213-20
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Colonoscopy - methods
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - secondary
Combined Modality Therapy
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Incidence
Manitoba - epidemiology
Mastectomy, Segmental - methods
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Survival Rate
Tamoxifen - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Abstract
Estrogen levels, which are involved in the development of breast cancer, may also be responsible for a higher incidence of right-sided colorectal neoplasia in women. Our objective was to determine the incidence of right-sided colorectal cancer (CRC) after the diagnosis of breast cancer.
All cases of breast cancers diagnosed between 1956 and 2006 were identified from the Manitoba Cancer Registry (MCR) and followed up until the diagnosis of any invasive cancer, death, migration out of the province, or 31 December 2006. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for all CRC and right-sided CRC (cecum, ascending colon, and hepatic flexure) were calculated to compare the observed CRC incidence with that expected in the general population. Stratified analysis was performed to determine the risk at different follow-up time intervals, age at breast cancer diagnosis, and for tamoxifen use.
There were 23,377 cases of breast cancer diagnosed between 1956 and 2006 with a total follow-up of 221,364 patient-years. The SIR for all CRC was 0.96 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.87-1.06) and for right-sided CRC it was 1.02 (95% CI 0.87-1.20). The SIRs remained close to unity at different time intervals, for different age groups, and in analysis restricted to more recent years (1985-2006). Tamoxifen use did not alter the risk of all CRC (SIR 1.22; 95% CI 0.92-1.62) or right-sided CRC (SIR 0.90; 95% CI 0.48-1.54).
There is no increase in the overall risk for CRC or for right-sided CRC after the diagnosis of breast cancer. CRC screening strategy for breast cancer survivors should be similar to that for the general population.
PubMed ID
19319130 View in PubMed
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Review of evidence on the early detection and treatment of breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25398
Source
Cancer. 1989 Dec 15;64(12 Suppl):2651-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1989
Author
A S Morrison
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912.
Source
Cancer. 1989 Dec 15;64(12 Suppl):2651-6
Date
Dec-15-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Insurance, Health
Middle Aged
Sweden
Time Factors
PubMed ID
2819675 View in PubMed
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Socioeconomic status differs between breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy and breast conservation, and affects patient-reported preoperative information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308135
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2020 Feb; 179(3):721-729
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2020
Author
A Frisell
J Lagergren
M Halle
J de Boniface
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, L1:00, Karolinska Institutet, 171 76, Stockholm, Sweden. axel.frisell@ki.se.
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2020 Feb; 179(3):721-729
Date
Feb-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Female
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Mastectomy - methods - statistics & numerical data
Mastectomy, Segmental - methods - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Patient Participation
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Risk factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Breast cancer treatment is reported to be influenced by socioeconomic status (SES). Few reports, however, stem from national, equality-based health care systems. The aim of this study was to analyse associations between SES, rates of breast-conserving surgery (BCS), patient-reported preoperative information and perceived involvement in Sweden.
All women operated for primary breast cancer in Sweden in 2013 were included. Tumour and treatment data as well as socioeconomic data were retrieved from national registers. Postal questionnaires regarding preoperative information about breast-conserving options and perceived involvement in the decision-making process had previously been sent to all women receiving mastectomy.
Of 7735 women, 4604 (59.5%) received BCS. In addition to regional differences, independent predictors of BCS were being in the middle or higher age groups, having small tumours without clinically involved nodes, being born in Europe outside Sweden, having a higher education than primary school and an intermediate or high income per household. Women with smaller, clinically node-negative tumours felt more often involved in the surgical decision and informed about breast-conserving options (both p?
PubMed ID
31735998 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.