Skip header and navigation

Refine By

116 records – page 1 of 12.

The Ability of Posters to Enhance the Comfort Level with Breastfeeding in a Public Venue in Rural Newfoundland and Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279830
Source
J Hum Lact. 2016 Feb;32(1):174-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Alissa Vieth
Janine Woodrow
Janet Murphy-Goodridge
Courtney O'Neil
Barbara Roebothan
Source
J Hum Lact. 2016 Feb;32(1):174-81
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Audiovisual Aids
Breast Feeding - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Public Opinion
Rural Population
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The acceptance and support of breastfeeding in public venues can influence breastfeeding practices and, ultimately, the health of the population.
The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether posters targeted at the general public could improve acceptability of breastfeeding in public places.
A convenience sample of 255 participants was surveyed at shopping centers in 2 rural communities of Newfoundland and Labrador. Experimentally, questions were posed to 117 participants pre- and post-exposure to 2 specific posters designed to promote public acceptance of breastfeeding in public.
Initially, we surveyed that only 51.9% of participants indicated that they were comfortable with a woman breastfeeding anywhere in public. However, context played a role, whereby a doctor's office (84.5%) or park (81.4%) were the most acceptable public places for breastfeeding, but least acceptable was a business office environment (66.7%). Of participants, 35.4% indicated previously viewing specific posters. We used a visual analog scale to test poster viewing on the acceptability of public breastfeeding in the context of a doctor's office and a restaurant. Results of pre- versus post-viewing of the promotional posters indicated significant improvements in both scenarios: in a doctor's office (P = .035) and in a restaurant (P = .021).
Nearly 50% of the surveyed population indicated discomfort with a mother breastfeeding in public. Both cross-sectional and interventional evidence showed that posters significantly improved the reported level of comfort toward seeing breastfeeding in public.
PubMed ID
26151965 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to medical treatment in relation to pregnancy, birth outcome & breastfeeding behavior among women with Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280216
Source
Dan Med J. 2016 Jul;63(7)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Mette Julsgaard
Source
Dan Med J. 2016 Jul;63(7)
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Birth weight
Breast Feeding - psychology
Crohn Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Patient compliance
Pilot Projects
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Pregnancy outcome
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Crohn's disease (CD) is common among women of fertile age, and it often requires maintenance medical treatment. Adherence to medical treatment among women with CD prior to, during, and after pregnancy has, however, never been examined. Although CD women have increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, little is known about predictors for these outcomes in women with CD. In addition, the impact of breastfeeding on disease activity remains controversial.
The aims of this PhD thesis were to determine adherence to treatment and to investigate predictors for and prevalence rates of non-adherence to maintenance medical treatment among women with CD prior to, during, and after pregnancy; to assess pregnancy outcomes among women with CD, taking medical treatment, smoking status, and disease activity into account; to assess breastfeeding rates and the impact of breastfeeding on the risk of relapse.
We conducted a population-based prevalence study including 154 women with CD who had given birth within a six-year period. We combined questionnaire data, data from medical records, and medical register data.
Among 105 (80%) respondents, more than half reported taking medication with an overall high adherence rate of 69.8%. Counselling, previous pregnancy, and planned pregnancy seemed to decrease the likelihood of non-adherence, whereas smoking seemed to predict non-adherence prior to pregnancy, although our sample size prevented any firm conclusions. During pregnancy, the vast majority (95%) of CD women were in remission. The children's birth weight did not differ in relation to maternal medical treatment, but mean birth weight in children of smokers in medical treatment was 274 g lower than that of children of non-smokers in medical treatment. In our relatively small study CD women in medical treatment were not at increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes compared with untreated women with CD. In total, 87.6% of CD women were breastfeeding, and rates did not vary by medical treatment. Smoking and non-adherence seemed to predict relapse in CD during the postpartum period, whereas breastfeeding seemed protective against relapse.  
Although we generally had low statistical precision this thesis suggests that counselling regarding medical treatment may be an important factor for medical adherence among CD women of fertile age. In addition CD women in medical treatment did not seem at increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcome, but smoking predicted lower birth weight. Breastfeeding did not seem to increase the risk of relapse in CD.
PubMed ID
27399984 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescents' perceptions of inpatient postpartum nursing care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165660
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Feb;17(2):201-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Wendy E Peterson
Wendy Sword
Cathy Charles
Alba DiCenso
Author Affiliation
Clinical Health Sciences (Nursing) program, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Feb;17(2):201-12
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Feeding - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant care
Infant, Newborn
Interviews as Topic
Maternal-Child Nursing - standards
Mothers - education - psychology
Narration
Nurse-Patient Relations
Ontario
Patient satisfaction
Postnatal Care - psychology - standards
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - psychology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - psychology
Abstract
The authors used a transcendental phenomenological approach to describe adolescent mothers' satisfactory and unsatisfactory inpatient postpartum nursing care experiences. They analyzed data from 14 in-depth interviews and found that adolescent mothers' satisfaction is dependent on their perceptions of the nurse's ability to place them "at ease." Nursing care qualities that contributed to satisfactory experiences included nurses' sharing information about themselves, being calm, demonstrating confidence in mothers, speaking to adolescent and adult mothers in the same way, and anticipating unstated needs. Nursing care was perceived to be unsatisfactory when it was too serious, limited to the job required, or different from care to adult mothers, or when nurses failed to recognize individual needs. In extreme cases, unsatisfactory experiences hindered development of an effective nurse-client relationship. These findings illustrate the value of qualitative inquiry for understanding patients' satisfaction with care, can be used for self-reflection, and have implications for nursing education programs.
PubMed ID
17220391 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aiming to be a breastfeeding mother in a neonatal intensive care unit and at home: a thematic analysis of peer-support group discussion in social media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275111
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2015 Oct;11(4):712-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Hannakaisa Niela-Vilén
Anna Axelin
Hanna-Leena Melender
Sanna Salanterä
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2015 Oct;11(4):712-26
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Middle Aged
Milk, Human
Mothers - psychology
Peer Group
Social Media
Social Support
Young Adult
Abstract
Preterm infants are usually breastfed less than full-term infants, and successful breastfeeding requires a supportive environment and special efforts from their mothers. A breastfeeding peer-support group, utilising social media, was developed for these mothers in order to support them in this challenge. Mothers were able to discuss breastfeeding and share experiences. The purpose of this study was to describe the perceptions of breastfeeding mothers of preterm infants based on the postings in peer-support group discussions in social media. The actively participating mothers (n?=?22) had given birth
PubMed ID
24521232 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing Infant Feeding Attitudes of Expectant Women in a Provincial Population in Canada: Validation of the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281423
Source
J Hum Lact. 2016 Aug;32(3):NP9-NP18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Laurie K Twells
William K Midodzi
Valerie Ludlow
Janet Murphy-Goodridge
Lorraine Burrage
Nicole Gill
Beth Halfyard
Rebecca Schiff
Leigh Anne Newhook
Source
J Hum Lact. 2016 Aug;32(3):NP9-NP18
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Bottle Feeding - psychology
Breast Feeding - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Intention
Mothers - psychology
Newfoundland and Labrador
Pregnancy - psychology
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Rural Population
Surveys and Questionnaires
Urban Population
Abstract
Maternal attitudes to infant feeding are predictive of intent and initiation of breastfeeding.
The Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale (IIFAS) has not been validated in the Canadian population. This study was conducted in Newfoundland and Labrador, a Canadian province with low breastfeeding rates. Objectives were to assess the reliability and validity of the IIFAS in expectant mothers; to compare attitudes to infant feeding in urban and rural areas; and to examine whether attitudes are associated with intent to breastfeed.
The IIFAS assessment tool was administered to 793 pregnant women. Differences in the total IIFAS scores were compared between urban and rural areas. Reliability and validity analysis was conducted on the IIFAS. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) of the IIFAS was assessed against mother's intent to breastfeed.
The mean ? SD of the total IIFAS score of the overall sample was 64.0 ? 10.4. There were no significant differences in attitudes between urban (63.9 ? 10.5) and rural (64.4 ? 9.9) populations. There were significant differences in total IIFAS scores between women who intend to breastfeed (67.3 ? 8.3) and those who do not (51.6 ? 7.7), regardless of population region. The high value of the area under the curve (AUC) of the ROC (AUC = 0.92) demonstrates excellent ability of the IIFAS to predict intent to breastfeed. The internal consistency of the IIFAS was strong, with a Cronbach's alpha greater than .80 in the overall sample.
The IIFAS examined in this provincial population provides a valid and reliable assessment of maternal attitudes toward infant feeding. This tool could be used to identify mothers less likely to breastfeed and to inform health promotion programs.
PubMed ID
25425631 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes and subjective norms of male and female adolescents toward breastfeeding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182807
Source
J Hum Lact. 2003 Nov;19(4):402-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Céline Goulet
Annie Lampron
Isabelle Marcil
Lise Ross
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing at the Université de Montreal.
Source
J Hum Lact. 2003 Nov;19(4):402-10
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Breast Feeding - psychology
Child
Fathers - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mothers - psychology
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
There is a lack of information regarding the attitudes of Québec's adolescents about breastfeeding and how others influence their opinions. The present study aims to describe attitudes and subjective norms of adolescent males and females toward breastfeeding and to determine whether these are related to gender, age, secondary education level, mother tongue, country of origin, feeding method as an infant, feeding method of siblings, and exposure to breastfeeding. Adolescents (N = 439) answered a questionnaire based on the theory of reasoned action. Both genders showed an overall positive attitude but negative subjective norms toward breastfeeding. Gender differences and relationships with external variables in terms of attitudes as well as subjective norms are presented. Possible avenues to promote breastfeeding are discussed.
PubMed ID
14620454 View in PubMed
Less detail

Birth to breast--a feeding care map for the NICU: helping the extremely low birth weight infant navigate the course.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153822
Source
Neonatal Netw. 2008 Nov-Dec;27(6):371-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Dorothy Dougherty
Maureen Luther
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. dorothy.dougherty@sunnybrook.ca
Source
Neonatal Netw. 2008 Nov-Dec;27(6):371-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benchmarking
Breast Feeding - psychology
Colostrum
Critical Pathways - organization & administration
Evidence-Based Nursing
Humans
Infant care
Infant, Extremely Low Birth Weight - physiology - psychology
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal - organization & administration
Mothers - education - psychology
Neonatal Nursing - organization & administration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Ontario
Patient Care Planning - organization & administration
Patient Education as Topic
Posture
Rooming-in Care
Social Support
Sucking Behavior
Suction - education - psychology
Abstract
Breast milk has been shown to contribute significantly to positive neurodevelopmental and medical outcomes in the extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infant population. It is crucial that ELBW infants receive their mother's colostrum as a first feeding, followed by expressed breast milk for as long as possible. Evidence-based literature supports the difficult challenges both mothers and ELBW infants face if they are to succeed at breast pumping and breastfeeding. Influencing factors include the medical fragility of the infant, limited frequency and duration of kangaroo care between mother and infant, lack of an adequate volume of breast milk, as well as inconsistent or incorrect information surrounding the use of breast milk and breastfeeding. A feeding care map as described in this article can help the bedside nurse assist the mother-ELBW infant dyad in optimizing breast milk volumes, laying the groundwork for breastfeeding. Displaying supportive practices and preterm infant developmental milestones, the map categorizes infant, maternal, and dyad feeding issues along a progressive time line from admission to discharge.
Notes
Comment In: Neonatal Netw. 2009 Jul-Aug;28(4):267-8; author reply 26819592371
PubMed ID
19065966 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breastfeeding and infant-mother interaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58827
Source
Acta Paediatr Suppl. 1999 Aug;88(430):1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
R. Zetterström
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. rolf.zetterstrom@acta-paediatrica.se
Source
Acta Paediatr Suppl. 1999 Aug;88(430):1-6
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Breast Feeding - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health education
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The prevalence of breastfeeding varies very much throughout the world. In some countries, such as in Scandinavia, it is extremely high, whereas it is rather low in many industrialized countries such as northern Italy. In urban areas of many developing countries the prevalence is extremely low, although it may be high in rural areas. For instance, in rural Guinea-Bissau in West Africa it is reported to be 100% at 3 mo of age, and this high prevalence may be explained by the fact that infants who have not been breastfed die before this age. In Sweden the prevalence at 2 mo of age was around 95% in 1945 (including infants fed by milk-mothers) but then gradually dropped until 1972, when it was as low as 20%. However, during the following 10-y period the prevalence gradually increased to around 80%. The main reasons for the decline most probably were that infant formulae, then considered to be safe, became available, that an increasing number of women started to work outside their homes, making formula feeding part of the feminist movement, and finally that no real attempts were made to promote breastfeeding in the maternity wards and well-baby clinics. The reverse trend started in 1972, when the attitude towards breastfeeding changed completely. Well-educated mothers became aware of the new discoveries of the importance of breastfeeding from immunological and nutritional points of view, and organized campaigns. Within a few years, the Swedish parliament passed a law which guaranteed all mothers paid leave from their work (80% of their salary) for 9 mo after childbirth, which has now been increased to 12 mo. The WHO/UNICEF code from 1980, which regulates the marketing of infant formula, has also probably played an important role. After a plateau for the prevalence of breastfeeding between 1982 and 1990, a further increase has taken place, particularly between 6 and 9 mo of age. Whereas the first phase in the increase of the prevalence of breastfeeding was, to a certain extent, the result of the concern of well-educated mothers, the second phase (1990-1998) may, at least partly, be explained by the fact that Swedish maternity wards then implemented the suggestion, launched by WHO/UNICEF, to create "baby-friendly" maternity hospitals with the aim of enabling all women to practise exclusive breastfeeding immediately after birth. Methods to stimulate lactation and proper nutritional suckling behaviour of the newborn were then developed.
PubMed ID
10569216 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Breast feeding and smoking--a study at a health center]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36966
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Nov 30;111(29):3496-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-1991
Author
P. Lagerløv
Author Affiliation
Grorud helsesenter, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Nov 30;111(29):3496-8
Date
Nov-30-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding - psychology
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Norway - ethnology
Smoking - adverse effects - psychology
Abstract
361 infants were seen at a total of 605 consultations at a child health centre. The aim was to study the relationship between breast-feeding practice and parental smoking at about six weeks, three months, six months and one year of age. The parents were questioned about breast-feeding, cigarette smoking and cultural origin. At the respective ages 83, 63, 45 and 15% of the infants were breast-fed. The fraction of 58 non-European mothers who breast-fed their children was not significantly lower than in our own culture. None of these mothers smoked, and their children more often had a home environment not involving exposure to tobacco. Compared with infants of non-smoking European women, a significantly lower fraction of children of non-European origin were breast-fed at six months of age, but not at six weeks and three months. Smoking was common in 40% of the mothers when the infant was six months or older. Between six weeks and three months after birth the fraction of smoking mothers increased from 28 to 37%. A significantly lower fraction of smoking mothers than of non-smoking ones breast-fed their infants between the age of three months and one year.
PubMed ID
1796433 View in PubMed
Less detail

116 records – page 1 of 12.