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90 records – page 1 of 9.

Accounting for the contribution of vitamin B to Canada's WWII effort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138851
Source
J Hist Sociol. 2010;23(4):517-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Robyn Braun
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta.
Source
J Hist Sociol. 2010;23(4):517-41
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - economics - history
Canada - ethnology
Flour - economics - history
Food, Fortified - economics - history
Government Programs - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 20th Century
Humans
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Public Health - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Vitamin B Complex - history
Vitamin B Deficiency - ethnology - history
World War II
Abstract
Canada began to fortify its flour and bread with vitamin B when it entered the Second World War. The decision was informed by the biology of vitamin B and therefore I suggest that the complexity of this political maneuver can best be understood by considering the specificity of the biochemistry of vitamin B. In this paper I will show that the specific biology of vitamin B allowed the Canadian government the possibility of a healthier population under wartime conditions but also allowed the government a variety of means by which to develop and organize food processing practices to this end.
PubMed ID
21132948 View in PubMed
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Acrylamide-asparagine relationship in baked/toasted wheat and rye breads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156290
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Kit Granby
Nikoline Juul Nielsen
Rikke V Hedegaard
Tue Christensen
Mette Kann
Leif H Skibsted
Author Affiliation
Technical University of Denmark, National food Institute, Søborg, DK-2860, Denmark. kgr@food.dtu.dk
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - analysis
Asparagine - analysis
Bread - analysis
Carcinogens - analysis
Cooking - methods
Denmark
Diet
Flour
Food Technology - methods
Hot Temperature
Humans
Maillard Reaction
Risk Assessment - methods
Secale cereale
Triticum
Abstract
Acrylamide in baked and toasted wheat and rye bread was studied in relation to levels of asparagine in flour, dough, bread and toasts. Asparagine was consumed during bread preparation resulting in reduced acrylamide content in the products. In wheat bread, 12% of the asparagine initially present in the flour (0.14 g kg(-1)) remained after yeast fermentation and baking; for rye bread, 82% of asparagine remained after sourdough fermentation and baking. Asparagine present in untoasted wheat bread had totally reacted after hard toasting. Toasted wheat and rye bread slices contained 11-161 and 27-205 microg kg(-1) acrylamide, respectively, compared to untoasted wheat and rye bread with
PubMed ID
18608496 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index is associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer in women: the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121827
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2013
Author
Cecilie Kyrø
Guri Skeie
Steffen Loft
Kim Overvad
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Date
Mar-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Avena sativa
Brassica
Bread
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Norway
Pyrus
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Secale cereale
Vegetables
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a multi-factorial disease in which diet is believed to play a role. Little is known about the health effects of specific regional diets. The Nordic diet is high in fat and sugar but also includes a range of traditional products with anticipated health-promoting effects. The aim of this cohort study was to determine whether a healthy Nordic food index consisting of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables was related to CRC incidence. Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, of whom 1025 developed CRC (13 years' follow-up). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % CI were calculated from Cox proportional hazard models. Women who strongly adhered to a healthy Nordic food index had a 35 % lower incidence of CRC than women with poor adherence (adjusted IRR, 0·65; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·94); a similar tendency was found for men. Women had a 9 % lower incidence of CRC per point adherence to the healthy Nordic food index, but no significant effect was found for men. A regional diet based on healthy Nordic food items was therefore associated with a lower incidence of CRC in women. The protective effect was of the same magnitude as previously found for the Mediterranean diet, suggesting that healthy regional diets should be promoted in order to ensure health; this will also preserve cultural heredity and the environment.
Notes
Erratum In: Br J Nutr. 2014 Feb;111(4):758-9
PubMed ID
22874538 View in PubMed
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Alkylresorcinols in Latvian and Finnish breads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122442
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2013 Feb;64(1):117-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Laila Meija
Adile Samaletdin
Anja Koskela
Aivars Lejnieks
Vilnis Lietuvietis
Herman Adlercreutz
Author Affiliation
Riga Stradins University, Riga, Latvia. laila@meija.lv
Source
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2013 Feb;64(1):117-21
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - analysis
Diet
Dietary Fiber - analysis
Finland
Flour - analysis
Humans
Latvia
Plant Extracts - chemistry
Resorcinols - analysis
Secale cereale - chemistry
Seeds - chemistry
Triticum - chemistry
Abstract
The alkylresorcinol (AR) content and relative homologue composition were determined in 9 Latvian and 11 Finnish soft breads. ARs were extracted with hot 1-propanol and quantified, using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The total AR content (µg/g dry matter) varied from 560 to 840 in rye breads, from 500 to 700 in Finnish mixed rye and wheat flour breads, from 200 to 300 in Latvian mixed rye and wheat flour breads and from 25 to 30 in white wheat breads. Rye and white wheat breads in the two countries varied only slightly in AR content, but there were wide variations in AR content in mixed flour breads. The AR contents in soft breads could be indicators of bran or fibre content, but not of whole-grain flour content.
PubMed ID
22816971 View in PubMed
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Application of isotope dilution mass spectrometry: determination of ochratoxin A in the Canadian Total Diet Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134090
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):754-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
J. Tam
P. Pantazopoulos
P M Scott
J. Moisey
R W Dabeka
I D K Richard
Author Affiliation
Health Canada-Santé Canada, Ontario Region, Food Laboratories Division, 2301 Midland Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):754-61
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - analysis
Calibration
Canada
Carbon Isotopes
Cereals - chemistry
Chromatography, Affinity
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Diet
Fast Foods - analysis
Food Analysis - methods
Food Contamination
Food Habits
Humans
Indicator Dilution Techniques
Limit of Detection
Nutrition Surveys
Ochratoxins - analysis - chemistry - isolation & purification
Reproducibility of Results
Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Abstract
Analytical methods are generally developed and optimized for specific commodities. Total Diet Studies, representing typical food products 'as consumed', pose an analytical challenge since every food product is different. In order to address this technical challenge, a selective and sensitive analytical method was developed suitable for the quantitation of ochratoxin A (OTA) in Canadian Total Diet Study composites. The method uses an acidified solvent extraction, an immunoaffinity column (IAC) for clean-up, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for identification and quantification, and a uniformly stable isotope-labelled OTA (U-[(13)C(20)]-OTA) as an internal recovery standard. Results are corrected for this standard. The method is accurate (101% average recovery) and precise (5.5% relative standard deviation (RSD)) based on 17 duplicate analysis of various food products over 2 years. A total of 140 diet composites were analysed for OTA as part of the Canadian Total Diet Study. Samples were collected at retail level from two Canadian cities, Quebec City and Calgary, in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The results indicate that 73% (102/140) of the samples had detectable levels of OTA, with some of the highest levels of OTA contamination found in the Canadian bread supply.
Notes
Cites: Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Sep;51(9):1131-4617729220
Cites: J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci. 2006 Nov 7;843(2):295-30116939716
Cites: Anal Bioanal Chem. 2008 Jun;391(4):1443-5018256811
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2009 Jul 22;57(14):6036-4019537783
Cites: Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2010 Feb;27(2):212-4020013446
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Cites: Food Addit Contam. 2005 Feb;22(2):163-7215824007
Cites: Food Chem Toxicol. 2005 Oct;43(10):1541-5515963619
Cites: Anal Bioanal Chem. 2005 Oct;383(4):570-516158296
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 2005;22 Suppl 1:37-4416332620
Cites: J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2006 May-Jun;9(3):265-9616621780
Cites: Food Chem Toxicol. 2008 Mar;46(3):879-8518037554
PubMed ID
21623499 View in PubMed
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Are Food Advertisements Promoting More Unhealthy Foods and Beverages over Time? Evidence from Three Swedish Food Magazines, 1995-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279943
Source
Ecol Food Nutr. 2017 Jan-Feb;56(1):45-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Andreas Håkansson
Source
Ecol Food Nutr. 2017 Jan-Feb;56(1):45-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - trends
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - economics
Beverages - adverse effects - economics
Bread - adverse effects - economics
Consumer Behavior - economics
Dairy Products - adverse effects - economics
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - economics - ethnology
Food - adverse effects - economics
Food Preferences - ethnology
Fruit and Vegetable Juices - adverse effects - economics
Health Promotion - economics - trends
Health Transition
Healthy Diet - economics - trends
Humans
Nutritive Value
Periodicals as Topic - economics
Sweden
Abstract
Unhealthy food in advertising has been suggested as a mediator for the increase in diet-related illness. This study quantitatively investigates changes in food advertising between 1995 and 2014 in terms of food categories promoted, macronutrient content, and percentage of foods classified as heathy or unhealthy from a sample of 7,199 ads from three Swedish food magazines. With the exception of increased alcoholic beverage and decreased carbohydrate-rich-food promotion, no monotonic trends of increasingly unhealthy food advertisement are found. From these findings, it is argued that food magazine advertising is not a mediator of the adverse dietary trend.
PubMed ID
27880047 View in PubMed
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Assessment of Nutritional Adequacy of Packaged Gluten-free Food Products.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271315
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2014 Dec;75(4):186-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Tasha Kulai
Mohsin Rashid
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2014 Dec;75(4):186-90
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - adverse effects - analysis - economics
British Columbia
Costs and Cost Analysis
Diet, Gluten-Free - adverse effects - economics
Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects - economics
Edible Grain - adverse effects - chemistry - economics
Fast Foods - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Flour - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Food Labeling
Frozen Foods - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Humans
Meat Products - adverse effects - analysis - economics
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nova Scotia
Nutritive Value
Serving Size
Abstract
There is concern about the nutritional quality of processed gluten-free (GF) products. The aim was to investigate the nutrient composition and cost of processed GF products compared with similar regular products.
Product size, price, caloric value, and macro- and micronutrient composition were compared between foods labeled "Gluten-free" and comparable regular products in 5 grocery stores in 3 Canadian cities. Data were calculated per 100 g of product.
A total of 131 products were studied (71 GF, 60 regular). Overall, calories were comparable between GF and regular foods. However, fat content of GF breads was higher (mean 7.7 vs. 3.6 g, P = 0.003), whereas protein was lower (mean 5.0 vs. 8.0 g, P = 0.001). Mean carbohydrate content of GF pasta was higher (78 vs. 74 g, P = 0.001), whereas protein (7.5 vs. 13.3 g, P
PubMed ID
26067071 View in PubMed
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Berries reduce postprandial insulin responses to wheat and rye breads in healthy women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116740
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Apr;143(4):430-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Riitta Törrönen
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Essi Sarkkinen
Kaisa Poutanen
Hannu Mykkänen
Leo Niskanen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Apr;143(4):430-6
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis
Bread
Cross-Over Studies
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Fragaria
Fruit
Humans
Insulin - blood
Middle Aged
Photinia
Postprandial Period - physiology
Ribes
Secale cereale
Single-Blind Method
Starch - administration & dosage
Triticum
Vaccinium macrocarpon
Vaccinium myrtillus
Vaccinium vitis-idaea
Abstract
Starch in white wheat bread (WB) induces high postprandial glucose and insulin responses. For rye bread (RB), the glucose response is similar, whereas the insulin response is lower. In vitro studies suggest that polyphenol-rich berries may reduce digestion and absorption of starch and thereby suppress postprandial glycemia, but the evidence in humans is limited. We investigated the effects of berries consumed with WB or RB on postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Healthy females (n = 13-20) participated in 3 randomized, controlled, crossover, 2-h meal studies. They consumed WB or RB, both equal to 50 g available starch, with 150 g whole-berry purée or the same amount of bread without berries as reference. In study 1, WB was served with strawberries, bilberries, or lingonberries and in study 2 with raspberries, cloudberries, or chokeberries. In study 3, WB or RB was served with a mixture of berries consisting of equal amounts of strawberries, bilberries, cranberries, and blackcurrants. Strawberries, bilberries, lingonberries, and chokeberries consumed with WB and the berry mixture consumed with WB or RB significantly reduced the postprandial insulin response. Only strawberries (36%) and the berry mixture (with WB, 38%; with RB, 19%) significantly improved the glycemic profile of the breads. These results suggest than when WB is consumed with berries, less insulin is needed for maintenance of normal or slightly improved postprandial glucose metabolism. The lower insulin response to RB compared with WB can also be further reduced by berries.
PubMed ID
23365108 View in PubMed
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[Biologically active additive from milk thistle in the solution of public health problems].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204475
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1998;(3):33-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
E M Gil'miiarov
V M Radomskaia
I G Kretova
L N Vinogradova
A V Babichev
L A Ponomareva
L N Samykina
I V Sheshunov
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1998;(3):33-5
Date
1998
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bread
Food, Fortified
Humans
Plant Extracts - therapeutic use
Public Health
Russia
Silymarin - therapeutic use
Abstract
Influence of bioactive additions from natural vegetable raw materials--silybum marianum--in the content of bread products on health and metabolism was studied. It is shown bread products with silybum marianum to be effective medicine with general restorative influence, increasing internal protection resources, capacity for work and vital activity.
PubMed ID
9752670 View in PubMed
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Changes in predictors and status of homocysteine in young male adults after a dietary intervention with vegetables, fruits and bread.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156896
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2008 Jun;47(4):201-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Tonje Holte Stea
Mohammad Azam Mansoor
Margareta Wandel
Solveig Uglem
Wenche Frølich
Author Affiliation
Norwegian School of Hotel Management, University of Stavanger, 4036 Stavanger, Norway. tonje.h.stea@uis.no
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2008 Jun;47(4):201-9
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bread
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Fruit
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Hyperhomocysteinemia - blood - diet therapy
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Riboflavin - administration & dosage - blood
Treatment Outcome
Vegetables
Vitamin B 12 - administration & dosage - blood
Vitamin B Complex - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Elevated plasma total homocysteine (p-tHcy) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and an inverse association has been shown between the dietary intake of B-vitamins, B-vitamin profile and the concentration of p-tHcy.
The main objective of this investigation was to study the effect of a dietary intervention focusing on an increased intake of vegetables, fruits and bread. The effect of the dietary intervention was determined by the changes in plasma concentrations of tHcy, cysteine (cys), riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and serum concentrations of folate and vitamin B(12).
An intervention study with duration of 5 months, including 541 male recruits from the Norwegian National Guard, Vaernes and a control group, including 209 male recruits from the Norwegian Army, Heggelia.
The dietary intervention resulted in decreased concentration of p-tHcy (-10%, P = 0.002), p-cys (-6%, P
PubMed ID
18521531 View in PubMed
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90 records – page 1 of 9.