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Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index is associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer in women: the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121827
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2013
Author
Cecilie Kyrø
Guri Skeie
Steffen Loft
Kim Overvad
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Date
Mar-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Avena sativa
Brassica
Bread
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Norway
Pyrus
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Secale cereale
Vegetables
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a multi-factorial disease in which diet is believed to play a role. Little is known about the health effects of specific regional diets. The Nordic diet is high in fat and sugar but also includes a range of traditional products with anticipated health-promoting effects. The aim of this cohort study was to determine whether a healthy Nordic food index consisting of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables was related to CRC incidence. Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, of whom 1025 developed CRC (13 years' follow-up). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % CI were calculated from Cox proportional hazard models. Women who strongly adhered to a healthy Nordic food index had a 35 % lower incidence of CRC than women with poor adherence (adjusted IRR, 0·65; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·94); a similar tendency was found for men. Women had a 9 % lower incidence of CRC per point adherence to the healthy Nordic food index, but no significant effect was found for men. A regional diet based on healthy Nordic food items was therefore associated with a lower incidence of CRC in women. The protective effect was of the same magnitude as previously found for the Mediterranean diet, suggesting that healthy regional diets should be promoted in order to ensure health; this will also preserve cultural heredity and the environment.
Notes
Erratum In: Br J Nutr. 2014 Feb;111(4):758-9
PubMed ID
22874538 View in PubMed
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Brassica vegetables and breast cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19710
Source
JAMA. 2001 Jun 20;285(23):2975-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-2001
Author
P. Terry
A. Wolk
I. Persson
C. Magnusson
Source
JAMA. 2001 Jun 20;285(23):2975-7
Date
Jun-20-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Brassica
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: JAMA. 2001 Feb 14;285(6):769-7611176915
Comment On: JAMA. 2001 Feb 14;285(6):799-80111176919
PubMed ID
11410091 View in PubMed
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Diamondback moth in Ukraine: current status and potential for use biological control agents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99068
Source
Commun Agric Appl Biol Sci. 2009;74(2):387-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Y. Likar
T. Stefanovska
Author Affiliation
Department of Entomology, National University of Life and Environmental Science, 13, Heroiv Oborny, Kiev 03187, Ukraine.
Source
Commun Agric Appl Biol Sci. 2009;74(2):387-92
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Brassica - parasitology
Capsella - parasitology
Fertility - drug effects
Larva - drug effects - pathogenicity - physiology
Life Cycle Stages
Longevity - drug effects
Moths - drug effects - pathogenicity - physiology
Pest Control, Biological - instrumentation - methods
Pesticides - pharmacology
Pupa - drug effects - physiology
Ukraine
Abstract
The Diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xillostella (Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) is the insect pest damaging cabbage in Ukraine, especially in the Southern region. Biology, damage, population dynamics of diamondback moth and effect of natural enemies on the level of infestation of this pest by parasitoids and pathogens were studied in 2004-2007 in the laboratory and field conditions. Obtained results show that in general the pest has 2-3 generations, although up to 5-6 can evolve in the South. Fecundity and life longevity of Diamondback were studied on white cabbage, red cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower and two basic weeds: shepherd's purse and wild mustard. The host plant affects fecundity and life span of the diamondback moth. Fecundity differs significantly and is highest with white cabbage. Fauna of Diamondback moth parasitoids is quite rich. All stages are affected by numerous parasitoids and predators. Around 22 parasitoid species were recorded during the study. Overall parasitism ranged from 18% to 60% varying essentially between the areas. Apanteles (Cotesia) sp., Diadegma sp., Trichogramma sp. were most common in all areas. Steinernema sp., entomopathogenic nematodes are found to be natural enemies of diamondback moth. The range of natural enemies contributes significantly to the control of Diamondback moth. Conservation and augmentation of natural enemies should be used in IPM systems in order to control diamondback moth on cabbage. Entomopathogenic nematodes are prominent biocontrol agents.
PubMed ID
20222594 View in PubMed
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Dietary factors in relation to endometrial cancer: a nationwide case-control study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18878
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2002;42(1):25-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Paul Terry
Harri Vainio
Alicja Wolk
Elisabete Weiderpass
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. pterry@aecom.yu.edu
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2002;42(1):25-32
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Brassica
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Endometrial Neoplasms - etiology
Fabaceae
Female
Humans
Iron - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Abstract
The incidence of endometrial cancer varies up to 10-fold between high- and low-incidence regions, suggesting the importance of environmental factors, including diet, in the etiology of this disease. However, few studies have examined the role of diet in the etiology of endometrial cancer. Using unconditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), we analyzed data from a large, case-control study of Swedish-born postmenopausal women aged 50-74 yr (709 cases and 2,887 controls) residing in Sweden between 1994 and 1995. We found no clear association between foods or food groups and endometrial cancer risk, although high consumption of certain foods, such as Brassica vegetables, coffee, and legumes, might be associated with small-to-moderate reduced risks of endometrial cancer, while red meat consumption might be associated with a small-to-moderate increased risk. Daily use of calcium supplements appeared to lower endometrial cancer risk (OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3-0.9, P for trend = 0.04), especially among women with low calcium intake from dairy products. On the other hand, the use of iron supplements appeared to increase the risk (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 0.9-3.3, P for trend = 0.03). The findings are discussed with respect to previous studies and the possible underlying mechanisms.
PubMed ID
12235647 View in PubMed
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Discrimination of conventional and organic white cabbage from a long-term field trial study using untargeted LC-MS-based metabolomics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261906
Source
Anal Bioanal Chem. 2014 May;406(12):2885-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Axel Mie
Kristian Holst Laursen
K Magnus Åberg
Jenny Forshed
Anna Lindahl
Kristian Thorup-Kristensen
Marie Olsson
Pia Knuthsen
Erik Huusfeldt Larsen
Søren Husted
Source
Anal Bioanal Chem. 2014 May;406(12):2885-97
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture - methods
Brassica - chemistry - growth & development
Chromatography, Liquid
Denmark
Discriminant Analysis
Food, Organic - analysis
Mass Spectrometry
Metabolomics
Organic Agriculture - methods
Plant Leaves - chemistry - growth & development
Abstract
The influence of organic and conventional farming practices on the content of single nutrients in plants is disputed in the scientific literature. Here, large-scale untargeted LC-MS-based metabolomics was used to compare the composition of white cabbage from organic and conventional agriculture, measuring 1,600 compounds. Cabbage was sampled in 2 years from one conventional and two organic farming systems in a rigidly controlled long-term field trial in Denmark. Using Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structures-Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA), we found that the production system leaves a significant (p?=?0.013) imprint in the white cabbage metabolome that is retained between production years. We externally validated this finding by predicting the production system of samples from one year using a classification model built on samples from the other year, with a correct classification in 83 % of cases. Thus, it was concluded that the investigated conventional and organic management practices have a systematic impact on the metabolome of white cabbage. This emphasizes the potential of untargeted metabolomics for authenticity testing of organic plant products.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24618989 View in PubMed
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Effect of enzyme-aided cell wall disintegration on protein extractability from intact and dehulled rapeseed (Brassica rapa L. and Brassica napus L.) press cakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261578
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2014 Aug 13;62(32):7989-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-13-2014
Author
Katariina Rommi
Terhi K Hakala
Ulla Holopainen
Emilia Nordlund
Kaisa Poutanen
Raija Lantto
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2014 Aug 13;62(32):7989-97
Date
Aug-13-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed - analysis
Brassica napus - chemistry - cytology
Brassica rapa - chemistry - cytology
Cell Wall - metabolism
Dietary Proteins - chemistry - isolation & purification
Finland
Food Handling
Glycoside Hydrolases - metabolism
Hydrolysis
Microscopy, Fluorescence
Plant Epidermis - chemistry - cytology
Plant Proteins - chemistry - isolation & purification
Polysaccharides - metabolism
Seeds - chemistry - cytology
Solubility
Abstract
Cell-wall- and pectin-degrading enzyme preparations were used to enhance extractability of proteins from rapeseed press cake. Rapeseed press cakes from cold pressing of intact Brassica rapa and partially dehulled Brassica napus seeds, containing 36-40% protein and 35% carbohydrates, were treated with pectinolytic (Pectinex Ultra SP-L), xylanolytic (Depol 740L), and cellulolytic (Celluclast 1.5L) enzyme preparations. Pectinex caused effective disintegration of embryonic cell walls through hydrolysis of pectic polysaccharides and glucans and increased protein extraction by up to 1.7-fold in comparison to treatment without enzyme addition. Accordingly, 56% and 74% of the total protein in the intact and dehulled press cakes was extracted. Light microscopy of the press cakes suggested the presence of pectins colocalized with proteins inside the embryo cells. Hydrolysis of these intracellular pectins and deconstruction of embryonic cell walls during Pectinex treatment were concluded to relate with enhanced protein release.
PubMed ID
25039585 View in PubMed
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Effects of Break Crops on Yield and Grain Protein Concentration of Barley in a Boreal Climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272557
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(6):e0130765
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Ling Zou
Markku Yli-Halla
Frederick L Stoddard
Pirjo S A Mäkelä
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(6):e0130765
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brassica napus - growth & development
Cold Climate
Cold Temperature
Crop Production - methods
Crops, Agricultural - growth & development
Ecosystem
Edible Grain - growth & development
Finland
Hordeum - growth & development
Lupinus - growth & development
Soil - chemistry
Vicia faba - growth & development
Abstract
Rotation with dicotyledonous crops to break cereal monoculture has proven to be beneficial to successive cereals. In two fields where the soil had been subjected to prolonged, continuous cereal production, two 3-year rotation trials were established. In the first year, faba bean, turnip rape and barley were grown, as first crops, in large blocks and their residues tilled into the soil after harvest. In the following year, barley, buckwheat, caraway, faba bean, hemp and white lupin were sown, as second crops, in each block and incorporated either at flowering stage (except barley) or after harvest. In the third year, barley was grown in all plots and its yield and grain protein concentration were determined. Mineral N in the plough layer was determined two months after incorporation of crops and again before sowing barley in the following year. The effect of faba bean and turnip rape on improving barley yields and grain protein concentration was still detectable two years after they were grown. The yield response of barley was not sensitive to the growth stage of second crops when they were incorporated, but was to different second crops, showing clear benefits averaging 6-7% after white lupin, faba bean and hemp but no benefit from caraway or buckwheat. The effect of increased N in the plough layer derived from rotation crops on barley yields was minor. Incorporation of plants at flowering stage slightly increased third-year barley grain protein concentration but posed a great potential for N loss compared with incorporation of crop residues after harvest, showing the value of either delayed incorporation or using catch crops.
Notes
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2005 Mar 1;52(1):49-5816329892
Cites: Pest Manag Sci. 2007 Apr;63(4):327-4817348068
Cites: Biol Res. 2012;45(2):171-523096361
PubMed ID
26076452 View in PubMed
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Effects of Organic and Waste-Derived Fertilizers on Yield, Nitrogen and Glucosinolate Contents, and Sensory Quality of Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275404
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2015 Dec 23;63(50):10757-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-23-2015
Author
Ingunn Øvsthus
Tor Arvid Breland
Sidsel Fiskaa Hagen
Kirsten Brandt
Anne-Berit Wold
Gunnar B Bengtsson
Randi Seljåsen
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2015 Dec 23;63(50):10757-67
Date
Dec-23-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Shells
Animals
Brassica - chemistry - drug effects - growth & development
Fertilizers
Glucosinolates - analysis
Humans
Manure
Minerals
Nitrogen - analysis
Norway
Organic Agriculture - methods
Penaeidae
Sensation
Sheep
Abstract
Organic vegetable production attempts to pursue multiple goals concerning influence on environment, production resources, and human health. In areas with limited availability of animal manure, there is a need for considering various off-farm nutrient resources for such production. Different organic and waste-derived fertilizer materials were used for broccoli production at two latitudes (58° and 67°) in Norway during two years. The fertilizer materials were applied at two rates of total N (80 and 170 kg ha(-1)) and compared with mineral fertilizer (170 kg ha(-1)) and no fertilizer. Broccoli yield was strongly influenced by fertilizer materials (algae meal
PubMed ID
26553169 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer risk: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82746
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Feb;15(2):301-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Håkansson Niclas
Näslund Ingmar
Bergkvist Leif
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Feb;15(2):301-5
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brassica
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
High consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a lower risk of pancreatic cancer in many case-control studies. However, cohort studies on this relationship are limited and do not support an association. We examined the associations of overall consumption of fruits and vegetables and consumption of certain subgroups of fruits and vegetables with the incidence of pancreatic cancer among 81,922 women and men in the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. During an average follow-up of 6.8 years (1998-2004), 135 incident pancreatic cancer cases were diagnosed. After adjustment for age and other risk factors for pancreatic cancer, the HRs for the highest compared with the lowest category of intake were 1.13 (95% CI, 0.66-1.94) for total fruits and vegetables, 1.10 (95% CI, 0.64-1.88) for total fruits, and 1.08 (95% CI, 0.63-1.85) for total vegetables. Among specific subgroups of fruits and vegetables, a nonsignificant inverse association was observed with cruciferous vegetable consumption (> or = 3 servings/wk versus or = 1 serving/wk versus never consumption: HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.39-0.99). Findings from this prospective study do not support a relationship of overall fruit and vegetable consumption with pancreatic cancer risk. The association between consumption of cruciferous vegetables and pancreatic cancer risk warrants further investigation.
PubMed ID
16492919 View in PubMed
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[Gastric secretory function in children with chronic biliary tract diseases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41589
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1978 Sep-Oct;(5):20-1
Publication Type
Article

21 records – page 1 of 3.