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[A case of ticlopidine-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: special emphasis on diffusion weighted MRI].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164975
Source
Rinsho Shinkeigaku. 2006 Oct;46(10):693-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Nozomu Matsuda
Akiko Yoshihara
Rie Nishikata
Toshie Matsuda
Kazuhiro Endo
Teiji Yamamoto
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurolgy, Fukushima Medical University.
Source
Rinsho Shinkeigaku. 2006 Oct;46(10):693-8
Date
Oct-2006
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ADAM Proteins - metabolism
Aged
Brain - pathology - radionuclide imaging
Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Fibrinolytic Agents - adverse effects
Humans
Iofetamine - diagnostic use
Male
Plasma Exchange
Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic - diagnosis - therapy
Ticlopidine - adverse effects
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Abstract
A 69-year-old man of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) associated with ticlopidine was reported. The patient initially complained of dysarthria and left hemiparesis one month after oral administration of ticlopidine. These motor symptoms were followed by gradual deline in level of consciousness. On admission, he was in apallic state with focal cerebral signs, accompanied by low-grade fever, and purpuric eruptions. Laboratory findings showed remarkable thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and renal dysfunction. The patient received diagnosis of TTP based on Moschcowitzs criteria. Prompt initiation of plasma exchange dramatically improved the patient's clinical symptoms. In this case, decreased activities of a disintegrin and metallo proteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) in plasma and anti-ADAMTS13 IgG antibodies were detected. Serial diffusion weighted MRI with six-day interval starting from the onset showed two interesting findings. First, appearance and disappearance of scattered high intensity areas were observed in the cerebellum, corpus callosum, cerebral white matter, and neocortex. Second, these lesions roughly corresponded to border-zone infarct in distribution. Cranial MRI findings of TTP in the literature could be classified into the following four groups: 1) multiple infarction caused by microthrombi; 2) infarction caused by occulusion of an intracranial main artery; 3) reversible edema involving the cerebral white matter; and 4) unremarkable finding without specific abnormality. This case could be classified into the group 1. Based on the diffusion weighted MRI findings of this case, a previous pathological report and recent elucidations of clinical conditions, it is hypothesized that TTP is a predisposition for resembling the border-zone infarction in group 1. The border-zone distribution of transient high intensity areas in diffusion weighted MRI in this case could be explained by either high resistant vascules zone or impaired clearance of emboli, taking an autopsy case report into consideration.
PubMed ID
17323777 View in PubMed
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Acute ischemic lesions of varying ages predict risk of ischemic events in stroke/TIA patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165277
Source
Neurology. 2007 Feb 6;68(6):415-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-6-2007
Author
P N Sylaja
S B Coutts
S. Subramaniam
M D Hill
M. Eliasziw
A M Demchuk
Author Affiliation
Calgary Stroke Program, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 2T9.
Source
Neurology. 2007 Feb 6;68(6):415-9
Date
Feb-6-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Brain - pathology
Comorbidity
Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Ischemic Attack, Transient - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Stroke - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Multiple ischemic lesions identified by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have been shown to predict high risk of future ischemic events. However, the importance of lesion age has not been factored into this risk. Our goal was to evaluate whether the presence of ischemic lesions of varying ages identified by DWI and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) suggests a higher risk of future ischemic events.
Patients with acute stroke and TIA presenting within 12 hours of symptom onset who had a baseline and 1-month follow-up MRI were enrolled in the study. Acute ischemic lesions were divided into DWI positive with ADC low lesions and DWI positive with ADC normalized lesions. The baseline MRI and the presence of new lesions on the follow-up MRI were analyzed.
A total of 360 patients were prospectively enrolled, and all had appropriate imaging. Two hundred twenty-three were excluded as there were no DWI lesions, they received recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, or they did not have the 30-day follow-up MRI. One hundred seventeen patients had DWI lesions of one age (DWI positive with either ADC low lesions or ADC normalized lesions alone) and 20 had lesions of varying ages (DWI positive lesions with reduced and normalized ADC) on the baseline MRI. Patients with multiple DWI lesions of varying ages were at more risk of having new lesions on the 30-day MRI compared with those having lesions of the same age (relative risk = 3.6; 95% CI 1.9 to 6.8). Multiple DWI lesions of varying ages (odds ratio [OR] 6.6; 95% CI 2.3 to 19.1) and cardioembolic stroke subtype (OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.1 to 8.7) were independently associated with new lesion recurrence by multiple logistic regression analysis.
The presence of multiple diffusion-weighted imaging lesions of varying ages suggests very active early recurrence over time and portends a higher early risk of future ischemic events.
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2007 Feb 6;68(6):398-917283310
PubMed ID
17283315 View in PubMed
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Acute necrotizing encephalopathy in caucasian children: two cases and review of the literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174029
Source
J Child Neurol. 2005 Jun;20(6):527-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Adam Kirton
Kevin Busche
Catherine Ross
Elaine Wirrell
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Child Neurol. 2005 Jun;20(6):527-32
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain - pathology
Canada
Chickenpox
European Continental Ancestry Group
Fatal Outcome
Female
Humans
Infant
Influenza A virus
Influenza, Human
Leukoencephalitis, Acute Hemorrhagic - etiology - pathology
Liver Diseases - etiology
Myocardium - pathology
Necrosis
Rotavirus Infections
Seizures - etiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
Acute necrotizing encephalopathy is a fulminant neurologic disease seen predominantly in Japan and Taiwan. We present two cases diagnosed at a Canadian center within the same year in Caucasian children. Both were previously well, developed an acute viral illness with fever and vomiting, and progressed to brain death within 2 to 4 days. Neuroimaging and postmortem examination demonstrated the unique features of bilateral and severe necrosis of deep gray- and subcortical white-matter structures. The first case was associated with extensive, but transient, hepatic involvement, recent varicella and rotavirus infections, and detailed metabolic studies, including mitochondrial functional analysis, were normal. The second case tested positive for influenza A infection, whereas evidence of liver damage was lacking. Both children demonstrated early lymphopenia and myocardial necrosis, two features not previously associated with acute necrotizing encephalopathy. These cases are unique in their occurrence in non-Japanese children and are among the first published reports in Canada.
PubMed ID
15996405 View in PubMed
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Age and surgical outcome of low-grade glioma in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296010
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2018 Oct; 138(4):359-368
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
A Corell
L Carstam
A Smits
R Henriksson
A S Jakola
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2018 Oct; 138(4):359-368
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aging - pathology
Brain - pathology - surgery
Brain Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Female
Glioma - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Low-grade gliomas (LGG) are slow-growing primary brain tumors that typically affect young adults. Advanced age is widely recognized as a poor prognostic factor in LGG. The impact of age on postoperative outcome in this patient group has not been systemically studied.
We performed a nationwide register-based study with data from the Swedish Brain Tumor Registry (SBTR) for all adults diagnosed with a supratentorial LGG (WHO grade II astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, or oligodendroglioma) during 2005-2015. Patient- and tumor-related characteristics, postoperative complications, and survival were compared between three different age groups (18-39 years, 40-59 years, and =60 years).
We identified 548 patients; 204 patients (37.2%) aged 18-39 years, 227 patients (41.4%) aged 40-59 years, and 117 patients (21.4%) =60 years of age. Unfavorable preoperative prognostic factors (eg, functional status and neurological deficit) were more common with increased age (P 
PubMed ID
29900547 View in PubMed
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AIDS-related primary central nervous system lymphoma: a Norwegian national survey 1989-2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92607
Source
BMC Cancer. 2008;8:225
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Haldorsen Ingfrid S
Kråkenes Jostein
Goplen Anne K
Dunlop Oona
Mella Olav
Espeland Ansgar
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. ingfrid.haldorsen@helse-bergen.no
Source
BMC Cancer. 2008;8:225
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - complications - epidemiology
Adult
Brain - pathology
Central Nervous System Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lymphoma, AIDS-Related - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Registries
Risk
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a frequent complication in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The objective of this survey was to investigate incidence, clinical features, radiological findings, histologic diagnosis, treatment and outcome for all patients with histologically verified AIDS-related PCNSL diagnosed in Norway in 1989-2003. METHODS: We identified the patients by chart review of all cases recorded as PCNSL in The Norwegian Cancer Registry (by law recording all cases of cancer in Norway) and all cases recorded as AIDS-related PCNSL in the autopsy registry at a hospital having 67% autopsy rate and treating 59% of AIDS patients in Norway, from 1989 to 2003. Histologic material and radiological images were reviewed. We used person-time techniques to calculate incidence rates of PCNSL among AIDS patients based on recordings on AIDS at the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases (by law recording all cases of AIDS in Norway). RESULTS: Twenty-nine patients had histologically confirmed, newly diagnosed AIDS-related PCNSL in Norway from 1989-2003. Only 2 patients had this diagnosis established while alive. AIDS patients had 5.5% lifetime risk of PCNSL. Their absolute incidence rate of PCNSL per 100 person-years was 1.7 (95%CI: 1.1-2.4) and decreased during the consecutive 5-year periods from 3.6, to 2.5, and to 0.4 (p
PubMed ID
18684320 View in PubMed
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Alaskan Husky encephalopathy--a canine neurodegenerative disorder resembling subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy (Leigh syndrome).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6759
Source
Acta Neuropathol (Berl). 2000 Jul;100(1):50-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
O. Brenner
J J Wakshlag
B A Summers
A. de Lahunta
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6401, USA.
Source
Acta Neuropathol (Berl). 2000 Jul;100(1):50-62
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Alaska
Animals
Brain - pathology - physiopathology
Central Nervous System - pathology - physiopathology
Disease Progression
Dog Diseases - pathology - physiopathology
Dogs
Female
Inbreeding
Leigh Disease - veterinary
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spinal Cord - pathology - physiopathology
Abstract
The gross and histopathological findings in the brain and spinal cord of five Alaskan Husky dogs with a novel incapacitating and ultimately fatal familial and presumed hereditary neurodegenerative disorder are described. Four dogs presented with neurological deficits before the age of 1 year (7-11 months) and one animal at 2.5 years old. Clinical signs in all dogs were of acute onset and included ataxia, seizures, behavioral abnormalities, blindness, facial hypalgesia and difficulties in prehension of food. In animals allowed to survive, the disease was static but with frequent recurrences. Pathological findings were limited to the central nervous system. Grossly visible bilateral and symmetrical cavitated foci were consistently present in the thalamus with variable extension into the caudal brain stem. Microscopic lesions were more widespread and included foci of bilateral and symmetrical degeneration in the basal nuclei, midbrain, pons and medulla, as well as multifocal lesions at the base of sulci in the cerebral cortex and in the gray matter of cerebellar folia in the ventral vermis. Neuronal loss with concomitant neuronal sparing, spongiosis, vascular hypertrophy and hyperplasia, gliosis, cavitation and transient mixed inflammatory infiltration were the main histopathological findings. In addition, a population of reactive gemistocytic astrocytes with prominent cytoplasmic vacuolation was noted in the thalamus. Lesions of this nature in this distribution within the neuroaxis have not been reported in dogs. The neuropathological findings resemble Leigh's disease/subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy of man. Neuronal sparing in conjunction with apparently transient astrocytic vacuolation point to the possible pathogenetic role of astrocytes in the evolution of these lesions. An inherited metabolic derangement of unknown nature is postulated as the cause of this breed-specific disorder.
PubMed ID
10912920 View in PubMed
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The alcohol paradox: light-to-moderate alcohol consumption, cognitive function, and brain volume.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259852
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2014 Dec;69(12):1528-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Benjamin J K Davis
Jean-Sebastian Vidal
Melissa Garcia
Thor Aspelund
Mark A van Buchem
Maria K Jonsdottir
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Tamara B Harris
Vilmundur Gudnason
Lenore J Launer
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2014 Dec;69(12):1528-35
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Brain - pathology
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Prevalence
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Studies of older persons show consumption of light-to-moderate amounts of alcohol is positively associated with cognitive function and, separately, is negatively associated with total brain volume (TBV). This is paradoxical as generally, cognitive function is positively associated with TBV. We examined the relationships of TBV, global cognitive function (GCF), and alcohol consumption in a population-based cohort of 3,363 men and women (b. 1907-1935) participating in the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (2002-2006) and who were free of dementia or mild cognitive impairment
Drinking status (never, former, and current) and current amount of alcohol consumed were assessed by questionnaire. GCF is a composite score derived from a battery of cognitive tests. TBV, standardized to head size, is estimated quantitatively from brain magnetic resonance imaging.
Among women and not men, adjusting for demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, current drinkers had significantly higher GCF scores than abstainers and former drinkers (p
PubMed ID
24994845 View in PubMed
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Alzheimer changes are common in aged drivers killed in single car crashes and at intersections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203624
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 1998 Sep 28;96(2-3):115-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-28-1998
Author
M. Viitanen
K. Johansson
N. Bogdanovic
A. Berkowicz
H. Druid
A. Eriksson
P. Krantz
H. Laaksonen
H. Sandler
P. Saukko
I. Thiblin
B. Winblad
H. Kalimo
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 1998 Sep 28;96(2-3):115-27
Date
Sep-28-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - classification - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications - pathology
Brain - pathology
Female
Finland
Forensic Medicine - methods
Humans
Male
Plaque, Amyloid - pathology
Sweden
Abstract
With increasing age, diseases affecting the cognitive functions are more frequent. These diseases may increase the risk for fatal car crashes. We analyzed the frequency of neuropathological alterations characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (i.e. neuritic and diffuse plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles) in two association areas of the brain, parietal and frontal cerebral cortex, from 98 fatally injured aged drivers. In the age groups of 65-75 and over 75 years of age, 50% and 72% of the drivers, respectively, had neuritic plaques in either parietal and/or frontal cortex. In 14% of all killed drivers the number of neuritic plaques reached the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) age-related histologic score C, which indicates the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and an additional 33% had score B, which suggests the diagnosis of AD. Neuropathological AD changes were most common in the brains of drivers killed in single vehicle crashes, followed by multivehicle crashes at intersections and least common in multivehicle crashes elsewhere, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. In a great majority (80-85%) of cases the killed aged driver was the guilty party of the crash. The results imply, that incipient AD may contribute to fatal crashes of aged drivers, and therefore the forensic autopsy of these victims should include neuropathological examination.
PubMed ID
9854829 View in PubMed
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The Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170981
Source
Neuroimaging Clin N Am. 2005 Nov;15(4):869-77, xi-xii
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Susanne G Mueller
Michael W Weiner
Leon J Thal
Ronald C Petersen
Clifford Jack
William Jagust
John Q Trojanowski
Arthur W Toga
Laurel Beckett
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
Source
Neuroimaging Clin N Am. 2005 Nov;15(4):869-77, xi-xii
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis
Biological Markers
Brain - pathology
Canada
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - diagnostic use
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Positron-Emission Tomography - methods
Radiopharmaceuticals - diagnostic use
United States
Abstract
With increasing life expectancy in developed countries, the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its socioeconomic impact are growing. Increasing knowledge of the mechanisms of AD facilitates the development of treatment strategies aimed at slowing down or preventing neuronal death. AD treatment trials using clinical outcome measures require long observation times and large patient samples. There is increasing evidence that neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid and blood biomarkers may provide information that may reduce sample sizes and observation periods. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative will help identify clinical, neuroimaging, and biomarker outcome measures that provide the highest power for measurement of longitudinal changes and for prediction of transitions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16443497 View in PubMed
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269 records – page 1 of 27.