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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Source
Am J Sports Med. 1990 Sep-Oct;18(5):561
Publication Type
Article
Author
B D Jordan
Source
Am J Sports Med. 1990 Sep-Oct;18(5):561
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Boxing - injuries
Craniocerebral Trauma - prevention & control
Denmark
Head Protective Devices
Humans
Notes
Comment On: Am J Sports Med. 1990 Jan-Feb;18(1):98-1002301696
PubMed ID
2252100 View in PubMed
Less detail

Amateur boxing in Denmark. The effect of some preventive measures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103476
Source
Am J Sports Med. 1990 Jan-Feb;18(1):98-100
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Schmidt-Olsen
S K Jensen
V. Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Aalborg Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Am J Sports Med. 1990 Jan-Feb;18(1):98-100
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Boxing - injuries
Craniocerebral Trauma - prevention & control
Denmark
Humans
Methods
Abstract
A survey of all amateur boxing matches in Denmark was made during a 3 year period. Data was gathered on means by which bouts were ended by the referee or attending physician, such as knock outs or blows to the head. A total of 5272 matches were fought: 3240 were senior matches (over age 19) and 2032 were junior matches (ages 17 to 19). Prophylactic intervention--unlimited length of hand bandage, voluntary use of boxing helmets, and heavier gloves for boxers greater than 149 pounds--did not affect the frequency of matches being stopped because of knock outs or blows to the head.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Sports Med. 1990 Sep-Oct;18(5):5612252100
PubMed ID
2301696 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Amateur boxing--risks, ethics and the Medical Society].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196202
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Oct 10;120(24):2929-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-2000
Author
P J Faugstadmo
Author Affiliation
Røntgenavdelingen Rana sykehus 8607 Mo i Rana. pjf@rasyk.nl.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Oct 10;120(24):2929-30
Date
Oct-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Boxing - injuries - legislation & jurisprudence
Brain Injuries - etiology - prevention & control
Ethics, Medical
Humans
Norway
Risk factors
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
11143419 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does amateur boxing lead to chronic brain damage? A review of some recent investigations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222097
Source
Am J Sports Med. 1993 Jan-Feb;21(1):97-109
Publication Type
Article
Author
Y. Haglund
E. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Orthopaedic Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Am J Sports Med. 1993 Jan-Feb;21(1):97-109
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Boxing - injuries
Brain Damage, Chronic - diagnosis - etiology
Brain Injuries - etiology
Electroencephalography
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Neurologic Examination
Retrospective Studies
Soccer - injuries
Sweden
Track and Field - injuries
Abstract
Fifty former amateur boxers were examined and compared with two control groups of soccer players and track and field athletes. All subjects were interviewed regarding their sports career, medical history, and social variables. They underwent a physical and a neurologic examination. Personality traits were investigated and related to the platelet monoamine oxidase activity. Cerebral morphologic changes were evaluated using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Further, clinical neurophysiologic tests were made as well as neuropsychologic tests. No significant differences were found between the groups in any of the physical or neurologic examinations or in platelet monoamine oxidase activity. Socially, the boxers had a lower degree of education and had chosen less intellectual professions, but they were less impulsive and more socialized. The computed tomography images and magnetic resonance imaging studies showed no significant differences between the groups. There was a significantly higher incidence of slight or moderate electroencephalography deviations among the boxers. Neuropsychologically, the boxers had an inferior finger-tapping performance. Thus, no signs of serious chronic brain damage were found among any of the groups studied. However, the electroencephalography and finger-tapping differences between the groups might indicate slight brain dysfunction in some of the amateur boxers.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Sports Med. 1993 Sep-Oct;21(5):7648238728
PubMed ID
8427376 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does Swedish amateur boxing lead to chronic brain damage? 1. A retrospective medical, neurological and personality trait study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228259
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1990 Oct;82(4):245-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Author
Y. Haglund
G. Edman
O. Murelius
L. Oreland
C. Sachs
Author Affiliation
Dept of Orthopaedic Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1990 Oct;82(4):245-52
Date
Oct-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Boxing - injuries
Brain Damage, Chronic - diagnosis
Brain Injuries - diagnosis
Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders - diagnosis
Humans
Male
Neurologic Examination
Personality Disorders - diagnosis
Personality Inventory
Psychometrics
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Sweden banned professional boxing in 1969 and has also considered banning amateur boxing. We therefore analysed possible chronic brain damage in 47 former amateur boxers who started their careers after the introduction of stricter Swedish amateur boxing rules. The boxers were compared with three control groups--25 soccer players, 25 track and field athletes and 19 conscripts. All athletes were interviewed about their sports career, medical history and social variables. They then underwent a physical and a neurological examination, including a mini-mental state examination. Personality traits were investigated and related to their platelet MAO activity in the athletes as well as in the conscripts. No significant differences were found between the groups in any of the physical or neurological examinations. All had a normal mini-mental state examination. Thus, results from these test methods did not reveal any signs of chronic brain damage from Swedish amateur boxing. Neither were any significant differences found with regard to platelet MAO activity, while significant differences were found in some of the social and personality traits variables.
PubMed ID
2270754 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does Swedish amateur boxing lead to chronic brain damage? 2. A retrospective study with CT and MRI.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228060
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1990 Nov;82(5):297-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990
Author
Y. Haglund
G. Bergstrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1990 Nov;82(5):297-302
Date
Nov-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Boxing - injuries - legislation & jurisprudence
Brain - pathology
Brain Concussion - diagnosis
Brain Damage, Chronic - diagnosis
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
It is well known that professional boxers can develop chronic traumatic encephalopathy (dementia pugilistica) due to repeated head trauma. Beside CT findings indicating cerebral atrophy, the presence of a cavum septum pellucidum has been reported to indicate encephalopathy. CT findings in amateur boxers are not as well documented. The aim of this study was to find out if morphological changes could be demonstrated among former amateur boxers using CT and MRI. Two control groups of soccer players and track and field athletes in the same age-range were used for comparison. No significant differences in the width of the ventricular system, anterior horn index, width of cortical sulci, signs of vermian atrophy, or the occurrence of a cavum septum pellucidum were found between boxers and controls. A cavum septum pellucidum was found more often in the controls than in the boxers and is probably not a sign of earlier head trauma. MRI confirm no more findings than CT in this retrospective study.
PubMed ID
2281746 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does Swedish amateur boxing lead to chronic brain damage? 3. A retrospective clinical neurophysiological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227943
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1990 Dec;82(6):353-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
Y. Haglund
H E Persson
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm. Sweden.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1990 Dec;82(6):353-60
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arousal - physiology
Boxing - injuries
Brain - physiopathology
Brain Concussion - physiopathology
Brain Damage, Chronic - physiopathology
Brain Injuries - physiopathology
Brain Mapping - instrumentation
Brain Stem - physiology
Cerebral Cortex - physiopathology
Dominance, Cerebral - physiology
Electroencephalography - instrumentation
Epilepsy, Post-Traumatic - physiopathology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory - physiology
Humans
Male
Pitch Discrimination - physiology
Reaction Time - physiology
Retrospective Studies
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted - instrumentation
Soccer - injuries
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate possible chronic brain damage due to Swedish amateur boxing. Forty seven former amateur boxers, 22 with many (HM = high-matched) and 25 with few matches (LM = low-matched) during their career were examined and compared with two control groups of 25 soccer players and 25 track and field athletes in the same age-range. No severe EEG abnormality was found. There was a somewhat higher incidence of slight or moderate EEG deviations among HM-(32%, 7/22) and LM-(36%, 9/25) boxers than among soccer players (20%, 5/25) and track and field athletes (12%, 3/25). Brain electric activity mapping (BEAM), brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) and auditory evoked P 300 potential (P 300) did not differ significantly between the groups. No neurophysiological variable was correlated to the number of bouts, number of lost fights or length of boxing career. Thus, no signs of serious chronic brain damage was found among the amateur boxers or the soccer players and the track and field athletes. However, it cannot be excluded that the EEG differences between the groups may be a sign of slight brain dysfunction in some of the amateur boxers.
PubMed ID
2127153 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does Swedish amateur boxing lead to chronic brain damage? 4. A retrospective neuropsychological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227112
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1991 Jan;83(1):9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1991
Author
O. Murelius
Y. Haglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Alcohol and Drug Addiction Research, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1991 Jan;83(1):9-13
Date
Jan-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Boxing - injuries
Brain Concussion - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Brain Damage, Chronic - diagnosis - psychology
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Psychometrics
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
Does Swedish amateur boxing lead to any permanent neuropsychological deficit, caused by chronic brain damage? Fifty Swedish former amateur boxers, 25 soccer players, and 25 track and field athletes were investigated by standardized neuropsychological tests. In only one test did the groups differ significantly. Boxers who had taken part in a large number of bouts had a slightly inferior finger-tapping performance. None of the boxers were considered to have definite signs of intellectual impairment. In conclusion modern Swedish amateur boxing does not seem to lead to significant signs of neuropsychological impairment or "punch drunkenness", nor does it seem to differ in this respect from soccer playing or track and field sports.
PubMed ID
2011947 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2000 Jun;34(3):230
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
C. Cowie
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2000 Jun;34(3):230
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Injuries - prevention & control
Boxing - injuries
Canada
Culture
Ethics, Medical
Great Britain
Humans
Physician's Role
Social Class
Sports Medicine - standards
Notes
Comment On: Br J Sports Med. 1999 Dec;33(6):426-910597855
PubMed ID
10854031 View in PubMed
Less detail

Olympic boxing is associated with elevated levels of the neuronal protein tau in plasma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115718
Source
Brain Inj. 2013;27(4):425-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sanna Neselius
Henrik Zetterberg
Kaj Blennow
Jeffrey Randall
David Wilson
Jan Marcusson
Helena Brisby
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital , Gothenburg , Sweden. sanna.neselius@vgregion.se
Source
Brain Inj. 2013;27(4):425-33
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Amyloid beta-Peptides - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Boxing - injuries
Brain Injuries - blood - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor - blood
Cognition
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glasgow Coma Scale
Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein - blood
Humans
Male
Nerve Growth Factors - blood
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
S100 Calcium Binding Protein beta Subunit
S100 Proteins - blood
Sweden - epidemiology
tau Proteins - blood
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate if olympic (amateur) boxing is associated with elevation of brain injury biomarkers in peripheral blood compared to controls.
Thirty olympic boxers competing in at least 47 bouts were compared to 25 controls. Blood was collected from the controls at one occasion and from the boxers within 1-6 days after a bout and after a rest period of at least 14 days. Tau concentration in plasma was determined using a novel single molecule ELISA assay and S-100B, glial fibrillary acidic protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and amyloid ß 1-42 were determined using standard immunoassays.
None of the boxers had been knocked-out during the bout. Plasma-tau was significantly increased in the boxers after a bout compared to controls (mean?±?SD, 2.46?±?5.10 vs. 0.79?±?0.961?ng?L(-1), p?=?0.038). The other brain injury markers did not differ between the groups. Plasma-tau decreased significantly in the boxers after a resting period compared to after a bout (p?=?0.030).
Olympic boxing is associated with elevation of tau in plasma. The repetitive minimal head injury in boxing may lead to axonal injuries that can be diagnosed with a blood test.
PubMed ID
23473386 View in PubMed
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 2.