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17 records – page 1 of 2.

Aboriginal / subsistence whaling (with special reference to the Alaska and Greenland fisheries).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295212
Source
Reports of the International Whaling Commission. Special issue 4. 86 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1982
particular, bowhead) whaling. Although it believed that other factors than biology should be considered, it felt it did not possess such expertise. It looked to the Panel Meeting to provide information to help it address this difficult problem. Each of the three panel groups (Wildlife, Nutrition and
  1 document  
Source
Reports of the International Whaling Commission. Special issue 4. 86 p.
Date
1982
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3179731
Keywords
Bowhead whales
Aleuts
Eskimos
Inuits
Subsistence hunting
Whaling
Nutritional Requirements
Acculturation
Documents

RS464_SI04-AboriginalSub-1982.pdf

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Abundance estimate of the Okhotsk Sea population of the bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus Linnaeus, 1758).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293453
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2017 Nov; 477(1):236-238
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
O V Shpak
I G Meschersky
D M Kuznetsova
A N Chichkina
A Yu Paramonov
V V Rozhnov
Author Affiliation
Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. ovshpak@gmail.com.
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2017 Nov; 477(1):236-238
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Bowhead Whale - genetics - physiology
Endangered Species - statistics & numerical data
Genotype
Siberia
Abstract
Abundance of 388 ± 108 whales for the Okhotsk Sea bowhead whale population based on individual genotyping was estimated using the capture-recapture method for the open population model. The data demonstrate that this endangered population shows no signs of recovery.
Notes
Cites: Genetika. 2014 Apr;50(4):452-63 PMID 25715447
PubMed ID
29299808 View in PubMed
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Arctic science: The local perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130536
Source
Nature. 2011 Oct 13;478(7368):182-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-13-2011
Author
Henry P Huntington
Author Affiliation
Pew Environment Group, 23834 The Clearing Drive, Eagle River, Alaska 99577, USA. hhuntington@pewtrusts.org
Source
Nature. 2011 Oct 13;478(7368):182-3
Date
Oct-13-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Beluga Whale - physiology
Bowhead Whale - physiology
Cooperative Behavior
Ecology - manpower - methods
Global Warming - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Knowledge
Population Groups
Research Personnel - education
PubMed ID
21993743 View in PubMed
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Bowhead whale acoustic activity in the southeast Beaufort Sea during late summer 2008-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268610
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2013 Dec;134(6):4323
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Russell A Charif
Ashakur Rahaman
Charles A Muirhead
Michael S Pitzrick
Ann M Warde
James Hall
Cynthia Pyc
Christopher W Clark
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2013 Dec;134(6):4323
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics - instrumentation
Animals
Bowhead Whale - physiology
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Seasons
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Sound Spectrography
Time Factors
Transducers
Vocalization, Animal
Abstract
Autonomous passive acoustic recorders were deployed to record sounds of bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus) in the southeast Beaufort Sea for periods of 30-55 days during the late summer, open-water seasons of 2008-2010. Recordings were made in three areas licensed for hydrocarbon exploration, spanning the continental slope and adjacent outer shelf, and in a shallow inner-shelf area where bowheads have been observed congregating to feed in recent decades. Bowhead sounds were counted in samples comprising 10% of each recorded hour. In mid-August and September in all 3 years, the rate of bowhead calling at outer shelf sites exceeded that at adjacent continental slope sites by one to two orders of magnitude. Higher rates of calling occurred on the slope in late July and early August than at later dates. Calling rates varied by an order of magnitude between years in the one area that was monitored in different years. The highest rates of calling occurred on the inner shelf, offshore of the northern Tuktoyaktuk Peninsula. These trends are consistent with patterns of habitat use previously reported from aerial surveys in this and nearby areas of the Beaufort Sea and with the results of satellite tagging studies.
PubMed ID
25669244 View in PubMed
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Bowhead whale localization using asynchronous hydrophones in the Chukchi Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294364
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 07; 140(1):20
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2016
Author
Graham A Warner
Stan E Dosso
David E Hannay
Jan Dettmer
Author Affiliation
School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Suite 405A, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2, Canada.
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 07; 140(1):20
Date
07-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acoustics
Alaska
Animals
Bayes Theorem
Bowhead Whale
Population Surveillance - methods
Sound Spectrography
Time Factors
Uncertainty
Vocalization, Animal
Abstract
This paper estimates bowhead whale locations and uncertainties using non-linear Bayesian inversion of their modally-dispersed calls recorded on asynchronous recorders in the Chukchi Sea, Alaska. Bowhead calls were recorded on a cluster of 7 asynchronous ocean-bottom hydrophones that were separated by 0.5-9.2?km. A warping time-frequency analysis is used to extract relative mode arrival times as a function of frequency for nine frequency-modulated whale calls that dispersed in the shallow water environment. Each call was recorded on multiple hydrophones and the mode arrival times are inverted for: the whale location in the horizontal plane, source instantaneous frequency (IF), water sound-speed profile, seabed geoacoustic parameters, relative recorder clock drifts, and residual error standard deviations, all with estimated uncertainties. A simulation study shows that accurate prior environmental knowledge is not required for accurate localization as long as the inversion treats the environment as unknown. Joint inversion of multiple recorded calls is shown to substantially reduce uncertainties in location, source IF, and relative clock drift. Whale location uncertainties are estimated to be 30-160?m and relative clock drift uncertainties are 3-26?ms.
PubMed ID
27475129 View in PubMed
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Community-Based Marine Mammal Research in Alaska - Bowhead and beluga whales, walruses, and ice seals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297015
Source
Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Arctic Marine Mammal Program. 23 slides.
Publication Type
Report
Date
[2016]
Community-Based Marine Mammal Research in Alaska Anna Bryan Alaska Department of Fish and Game Arctic Marine Mammal Program Bowhead and beluga whales, walruses, and ice seals Bowhead Whale Satellite Tagging Partners: Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission, North Slope Borough
  1 document  
Author
Bryan, Anna
Source
Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Arctic Marine Mammal Program. 23 slides.
Date
[2016]
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
6822293
Keywords
Alaska
Bowhead whales
Beluga whales
Walruses
Ice seals
Traditional knowledge
Documents

D2_Community-Research_Bryan.pdf

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A difficult time with the permit process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141870
Source
J Hist Biol. 2011;44(1):103-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Etienne Benson
Author Affiliation
Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Boltzmannstraße 22, 14195, Berlin, Germany. esbenson@gmail.com
Source
J Hist Biol. 2011;44(1):103-23
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Bowhead Whale
Endangered Species - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 20th Century
Humans
Inuits - history
Licensure - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Politics
Research - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
In the 1970s, new forms of public scrutiny were applied to the research methods of field biologists in the United States, particularly those studying endangered species and marine mammals. This paper shows how such scrutiny affected researchers' choice of research methods through an analysis of a key moment in a decade-long controversy over the conservation of bowhead whales. In 1978, researchers at the Naval Arctic Research Laboratory received funding from the Bureau of Land Management to radio-tag bowhead whales. Although this promising but still largely untested technique might have answered one of the central scientific questions in the controversy, it ultimately went unused. Technical considerations played a role in the decision not to use the technique, but the most important factor was scientists' concerns about potential backlash from Iñupiat whalers and animal protectionists. The same forces that had made marine mammalogists more influential than ever and that had put into their hands the resources necessary to develop more effective research techniques also placed serious constraints on where, when, and how they could do their research.
PubMed ID
20665085 View in PubMed
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DNA evidence of bowhead whale exploitation by Greenlandic Paleo-Inuit 4,000 years ago.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294743
Source
Nat Commun. 2016 11 08; 7:13389
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-08-2016
Author
Frederik Valeur Seersholm
Mikkel Winther Pedersen
Martin Jensen Søe
Hussein Shokry
Sarah Siu Tze Mak
Anthony Ruter
Maanasa Raghavan
William Fitzhugh
Kurt H Kjær
Eske Willerslev
Morten Meldgaard
Christian M O Kapel
Anders Johannes Hansen
Author Affiliation
Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, 1350 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Nat Commun. 2016 11 08; 7:13389
Date
11-08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Archaeology
Biodiversity
Bowhead Whale - genetics
DNA - genetics
DNA Damage
DNA, Plant - genetics
Fossils
Geography
Geologic sediments
Greenland
Helminths - classification
Humans
Inuits
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Time Factors
Abstract
The demographic history of Greenland is characterized by recurrent migrations and extinctions since the first humans arrived 4,500 years ago. Our current understanding of these extinct cultures relies primarily on preserved fossils found in their archaeological deposits, which hold valuable information on past subsistence practices. However, some exploited taxa, though economically important, comprise only a small fraction of these sub-fossil assemblages. Here we reconstruct a comprehensive record of past subsistence economies in Greenland by sequencing ancient DNA from four well-described midden deposits. Our results confirm that the species found in the fossil record, like harp seal and ringed seal, were a vital part of Inuit subsistence, but also add a new dimension with evidence that caribou, walrus and whale species played a more prominent role for the survival of Paleo-Inuit cultures than previously reported. Most notably, we report evidence of bowhead whale exploitation by the Saqqaq culture 4,000 years ago.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27824339 View in PubMed
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Essential and non-essential elements in eight tissue types from subsistence-hunted bowhead whale: nutritional and toxicological assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81295
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Jun;65(3):228-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
O'Hara Todd M
Hanns Cyd
Bratton Gerald
Taylor Robert
Woshner Victoria M
Author Affiliation
Department of Wildlife Management, North Slope Borough, Barrow, USA. fftmo@uaf.edu
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Jun;65(3):228-42
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Alaska
Animals
Bowhead Whale - metabolism
Epidermis - chemistry
Food contamination - analysis
Gastrointestinal Tract - chemistry
Kidney - chemistry
Liver - chemistry
Metals - pharmacokinetics
Muscles - chemistry
Nutritive Value
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To assess essential/non-essential elements in bowhead whale. STUDY DESIGN: Analyzes of tissues for key elements and comparing them to published food guidelines. METHODS: Using national and international guidelines calculate percent (%) "Recommended Daily Allowance" of essential elements in 100 g portion of bowhead tissues. For non-essential elements, determine maximal tissue consumption based on average element concentrations and provisional tolerable weekly intake; and minimal risk level. RESULTS: Liver and kidney are rich in essential/non-essential elements and have the greatest concentration of cadmium (Cd) among tissues studied, while mercury (Hg), lead (Pb) and arsenic (As) are relatively low. Kidney of bowhead whale is consumed in very limited amounts (limited tissue mass compared to muscle and maktak); liver is consumed rarely. Other tissues, except blubber, are excellent sources of many essential elements, without the abundance of liver and kidney Cd. CONCLUSIONS: Renal Cd concentrations are most restrictive for consumption on a tissue mass basis. Better understanding of Cd bioavailability, food processing, and actual consumption rates and patterns, are critical to providing improved guidance. Compared to store-bought meat, bowhead whale had comparable concentrations of elements in the tissues studied, with a few noted differences. The occasional blubber substitute, Crisco, was nearly devoid of trace element content.
PubMed ID
16871829 View in PubMed
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Extreme diversity in the songs of Spitsbergen's bowhead whales.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298477
Source
Biol Lett. 2018 04; 14(4):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
K M Stafford
C Lydersen
Ø Wiig
K M Kovacs
Author Affiliation
Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105, USA kate2@uw.edu.
Source
Biol Lett. 2018 04; 14(4):
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Atlantic Ocean
Bowhead Whale - physiology
Seasons
Svalbard
Time
Vocalization, Animal - physiology
Abstract
Almost all mammals communicate using sound, but few species produce complex songs. Two baleen whales sing complex songs that change annually, though only the humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) has received much research attention. This study focuses on the other baleen whale singer, the bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus). Members of the Spitsbergen bowhead whale population produced 184 different song types over a 3-year period, based on duty-cycled recordings from a site in Fram Strait in the northeast Atlantic. Distinct song types were recorded over short periods, lasting at most some months. This song diversity could be the result of population expansion, or immigration of animals from other populations that are no longer isolated from each other by heavy sea ice. However, this explanation does not account for the within season and annual shifting of song types. Other possible explanations for the extraordinary diversity in songs could be that it results either from weak selection pressure for interspecific identification or for maintenance of song characteristics or, alternatively, from strong pressure for novelty in a small population.
PubMed ID
29618521 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.