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238Pu: accumulation, tissue distribution, and excretion in Mayak workers after exposure to plutonium aerosols.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126152
Source
Health Phys. 2012 Mar;102(3):243-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Klara G Suslova
Alexandra B Sokolova
Viktor V Khokhryakov
Scott C Miller
Author Affiliation
Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorskoe Shosse 19, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region, Russia. suslova@subi.su
Source
Health Phys. 2012 Mar;102(3):243-50
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols
Bone and Bones - metabolism - radiation effects
Health Physics
Humans
Liver - metabolism - radiation effects
Lung - metabolism - radiation effects
Occupational Exposure
Plutonium - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics - toxicity - urine
Russia
Solubility
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
The alpha spectrometry measurements of specific activity of 238Pu and 239Pu in urine from bioassay examinations of 1,013 workers employed at the radiochemical and plutonium production facilities of the Mayak Production Association and in autopsy specimens of lung, liver, and skeleton from 85 former nuclear workers who died between 1974-2009, are summarized.The accumulation fraction of 238Pu in the body and excreta has not changed with time in workers involved in production of weapons-grade plutonium production (e.g., the plutonium production facility and the former radiochemical facility). The accumulation fraction of 238Pu in individuals exposed to plutonium isotopes at the newer Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant ranged from 0.13% up to 27.5% based on the autopsy data. No statistically significant differences between 238Pu and 239Pu in distribution by the main organs of plutonium deposition were found in the Mayak workers. Based on the bioassay data,the fraction of 238Pu activity in urine is on average 38-69% of the total activity of 238Pu and 239Pu, which correlates with the isotopic composition in workplace air sampled at the Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant. In view of the higher specific activity of 238Pu, the contribution of 238Pu to the total internal dose, particularly in the skeleton and liver, might be expected to continue to increase, and continued surveillance is recommended.
PubMed ID
22420016 View in PubMed
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Analysis of strontium metabolism in humans on the basis of the Techa river data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209356
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 1997 Feb;36(1):25-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
E I Tolstykh
V P Kozheurov
O V Vyushkova
M O Degteva
Author Affiliation
Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Medgorodok, Chelyabinsk, Russia.
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 1997 Feb;36(1):25-9
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Body Burden
Bone and Bones - metabolism - radiation effects
Child
Female
Fresh Water
Humans
Male
Menarche
Menopause
Metabolic Clearance Rate
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Russia
Sex Characteristics
Strontium - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Water Pollution, Radioactive
Abstract
Age and sex features of strontium metabolism have been analyzed on studies of the population residing on the banks of the Techa river which was contaminated by fission products during the years 1949-1956. Measurements of 90Sr body burden have been performed since 1974 using a whole-body counter, and these have made it possible to estimate age-specific long-term retention and elimination rates for men and women. Regarding the retention that correlated with the respective maturation ages, distinct sex differences have been observed for adolescents, whereas only postmenopausal women showed a sharp increase of their elimination rates. There were no differences concerning the reproductive ages. Our experimental findings have a clear physiological interpretation and can be used to develop metabolic models for bone-seeking radionuclides.
PubMed ID
9128895 View in PubMed
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[Bone mineral density in residents living on radioactive territories of Cheliabinsk Region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139874
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2010 Jul-Aug;50(4):481-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
E I Tolstykh
N B Shagina
L M Peremyslova
M O Degteva
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2010 Jul-Aug;50(4):481-91
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density - radiation effects
Bone Marrow - radiation effects
Bone and Bones - metabolism - radiation effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radioactive Hazard Release
Siberia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Operation of "Mayak" plutonium production complex resulted in radioactive contamination of the part of Chelyabinsk Region in 1950-60s. Significant gas-aerosol emissions of 1311 occurred since 1948; in 1957, a radiation accident resulted in 90Sr contamination of large territories. This paper presents comparison of bone mineral density of persons lived on territories with different levels of soil 90Sr-contamination with a control group. It was found that in 1970-1975 the bone mineral density, estimated from mineral content in bone samples, in residents of contaminated areas born in 1936-1952 was significantly lower compared with the control group. For persons born in 1880-1935 such differences were not found. It was shown that the decrease in bone mineral density was not related to 90Sr exposure of osteogenic cells in the dose range from 0.1 to 1300 mGy: the coefficient of correlation between individual 90Sr-doses and bone mineral contents was not significant. The decrease in bone mineral density of persons born in 1936-1952 could be associated with exposure of thyroid and parathyroid glands (systemic regulators of calcium turnover) by 131I from gas-aerosol emissions from "Mayak". Maximum gas-aerosol emissions occurred in 1948-1954 and coincided with growth and development of thyroid gland, characterizing by intensive accumulation of 131I, and with growth and maturation of the skeleton of persons born in these calendar years.
PubMed ID
20968060 View in PubMed
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Increase in accumulation of strontium-90 in the maternal skeleton during pregnancy and lactation: analysis of the Techa River data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260980
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2014 Aug;53(3):551-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Evgenia I Tolstykh
Natalia B Shagina
Marina O Degteva
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2014 Aug;53(3):551-7
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Burden
Bone and Bones - metabolism - radiation effects
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Female
Humans
Lactation - metabolism - radiation effects
Maternal Exposure
Pregnancy
Reproduction - radiation effects
Rivers - chemistry
Russia
Strontium Radioisotopes - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - metabolism
Young Adult
Abstract
The unique contamination of the Techa River (Southern Urals, Russia) in the 1950s by long-lived (90)Sr allows investigation of the accumulation of bone-seeking elements in humans. This study is based on information compiled at the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (Chelyabinsk, Russia) over a long period of time. It includes the results of in vivo measurements of (90)Sr-body burden with a whole body counter (WBC), data on personal medical examinations and residence and family histories. Data on 185 women from two Techa riverside villages Muslyumovo and Brodokalmak were selected. The settlements differ in terms of (90)Sr diet intake (higher in Muslyumovo than in Brodokalmak) and ethnicity (residents were mainly Slavs in Brodokalmak and Turkic in Muslyumovo). Results of a total of 555 WBC measurements performed in 1974-1997 were available for the women studied; maximum measured values reached 40 kBq/body. The women from each settlement were subdivided into three groups according to their childbearing history: pregnancy and lactation occurred (1) during the period of maximal (90)Sr intake (1950-1951); (2) after the period of maximal intake and (3) before this period or women who were childless. An increase was found in accumulation of (90)Sr in maternal skeleton during pregnancy and lactation (group 1) by a factor of 1.5-2 in comparison with non-pregnant, non-lactating women. This result was found in both Muslyumovo and Brodokalmak samples. An increase in accumulation of toxic elements in pregnant/lactating women is associated with increased radiation/toxic doses and risk for the women's health.
PubMed ID
24861824 View in PubMed
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[Some health parameters in personnel contacting highly enriched uranium].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171371
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2005;(11):24-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
M V Sumina
T V Azizova
V S Pesternikova
Z D Beliaeva
V I Tel'nov
B G Lobanov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2005;(11):24-30
Date
2005
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bone and Bones - metabolism - radiation effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Incidence
Kidney - metabolism - radiation effects
Liver - metabolism - radiation effects
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Radiation Injuries - chemically induced - epidemiology - metabolism
Radiation, Ionizing
Russia - epidemiology
Uranium - adverse effects - metabolism
Abstract
The authors analysed 20-years and longer observations over health state of personnel having occupational contact with highly enriched uranium. Findings are no determined effects as clinical manifestations of chronic uranium intoxication, presented by most frequently involved systems (hemopoietic, bronchopulmonary) and main organs accumulating uranium (liver, kidneys, bones). Long-term observations revealed malignancies in 11% of the examinees. Further medical observations over the personnel (risk group) are required to evaluate risk of aleatory effects in prolonged contact with various uranium compounds.
PubMed ID
16381479 View in PubMed
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