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A 3-year physical activity intervention program increases the gain in bone mineral and bone width in prepubertal girls but not boys: the prospective copenhagen school child interventions study (CoSCIS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91757
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2008 Oct;83(4):243-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Hasselstrøm H A
Karlsson M K
Hansen S E
Grønfeldt V.
Froberg K.
Andersen L B
Author Affiliation
Institute for Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. henrietteh62@hotmail.com
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2008 Oct;83(4):243-50
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Bone Density - physiology
Bone Development - physiology
Bone and Bones - chemistry - physiology
Child
Denmark
Exercise
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Prospective Studies
Puberty - physiology
Sex Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increasing the amount of time spent in physical education classes on bone mineral accrual and gain in bone size in prepubertal Danish children. A total of 135 boys and 108 girls, aged 6-8 years, were included in a school-based curriculum intervention program where the usual time spent in physical education classes was doubled to four classes (180 min) per week. The control group comprised age-matched children (62 boys and 76 girls) recruited from a separate community who completed the usual Danish school curriculum of physical activity (90 min/week). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to evaluate bone mineral content (BMC; g), bone mineral density (g/cm(2)), and bone width at the calcaneus and distal forearm before and after 3 years of intervention. Anthropometrics and Tanner stages were evaluated on the same occasions. General physical activity was measured with an accelerometer worn for 4 days. In girls, the intervention group had a 12.5% increase (P = 0.04) in distal forearm BMC and a 13.2% increase (P = 0.005) in distal forearm scanned area compared with girls in the control group. No differences were found between the intervention and control groups in boys. Increasing the frequency of physical education classes for prepubertal children is associated with a higher accrual of bone mineral and higher gain in bone size after 3 years in girls but not in boys.
PubMed ID
18839047 View in PubMed
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[90Sr in residents of the Iset riverside settlements].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144798
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2010 Jan-Feb;50(1):90-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
E I Tolstykh
L M Peremyslova
N B Shagina
M O Degteva
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2010 Jan-Feb;50(1):90-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Humans
Radiation monitoring
Radioactive Hazard Release
Retrospective Studies
Rivers - chemistry
Rural Population
Siberia
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
The river Iset belongs to the Techa-Iset-Tobol-Irtysh-Ob system contaminated by liquid radioactive wastes from Mayak plutonium facility in 1949-1956. This study represents the first retrospective analysis of postmortem measurements of 90Sr in bones from residents of the Iset riverside settlements in 1960-1982. It was shown that 90Sr concentration in bones of residents lived in settlements located downstream from the Techa river mouth (Shadrinsk, Isetskoye, Yalutorovsk) was 5 times higher than average 90Sr concentration in bones of the Russian residents. There was not statistically significant difference in accumulated 90Sr in bones between residents of the considered Iset' settlements indicating similar levels of 90Sr ingestion. Dietary 90Sr intake was reconstructed from the measurements of the radionuclide in bones. Total 90Sr dietary intake in 1950-1975 was 68 kBq; and 90% of the intake occurred in 1950-1961. In 1960s, 90Sr-contamination of the diet in settlements located downstream from the Techa river mouth was mostly (by 70%) due to global fallouts. Absorbed dose in the red bone marrow cumulated over 25 years of exposure was equal to 14 (4.7-42) mGy.
PubMed ID
20297686 View in PubMed
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Accumulated body burden and endogenous release of lead in employees of a lead smelter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209372
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Feb;105(2):224-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
D E Fleming
D. Boulay
N S Richard
J P Robin
C L Gordon
C E Webber
D R Chettle
Author Affiliation
Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Feb;105(2):224-33
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body Burden
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Calcaneus - chemistry
Canada
Female
Humans
Lead - analysis - blood
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Occupational Exposure
Tibia - chemistry
Abstract
Bone lead levels for 367 active and 14 retired lead smelter workers were measured in vivo by X-ray fluorescence in May-June 1994. The bone sites of study were the tibia and calcaneus; magnitudes of concentration were used to gauge lead body burden. Whole blood lead readings from the workers generated a cumulative blood lead index (CBLI) that approximated the level of lead exposure over time. Blood lead values for 204 of the 381 workers were gathered from workers returning from a 10-month work interruption that ended in 1991; their blood level values were compared to their tibia and calcaneus lead levels. The resulting relations allowed constraints to be placed on the endogenous release of lead from bone in smelter works. Calcaneus lead levels were found to correlate strongly with those for tibia lead, and in a manner consistent with observations from other lead industry workers. Relations between bone lead concentration and CBLI demonstrated a distinctly nonlinear appearance. When the active population was divided by date of hire, a significant difference in the bone lead-CBLI slope emerged. After a correction to include the component of CBLI existing before the workers' employment at the smelter was made, this difference persisted. This implies that the transfer of lead from blood to bone in the workers has changed over time, possibly as a consequence of varying exposure conditions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
9105798 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of lead (Pb) in brown trout (Salmo trutta) from a lake downstream a former shooting range.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279581
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2017 Jan;135:327-336
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Espen Mariussen
Lene Sørlie Heier
Hans Christian Teien
Marit Nandrup Pettersen
Tor Fredrik Holth
Brit Salbu
Bjørn Olav Rosseland
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2017 Jan;135:327-336
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antimony - analysis
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Copper - analysis
Firearms
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Gills - chemistry
Kidney - chemistry
Lakes
Lead - analysis
Norway
Sports
Trout - blood - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Zinc - analysis
Zygote - chemistry - drug effects
Abstract
An environmental survey was performed in Lake Kyrtj?nn, a small lake within an abandoned shooting range in the south of Norway. In Lake Kyrtj?nn the total water concentrations of Pb (14?g/L), Cu (6.1?g/L) and Sb (1.3?g/L) were elevated compared to the nearby reference Lake Stitj?nn, where the total concentrations of Pb, Cu and Sb were 0.76, 1.8 and 0.12?g/L, respectively. Brown trout (Salmo trutta) from Lake Kyrtj?nn had very high levels of Pb in bone (104mg/kg w.w.), kidney (161mg/kg w.w.) and the gills (137mg/kg d.w), and a strong inhibition of the ALA-D enzyme activity were observed in the blood (24% of control). Dry fertilized brown trout eggs were placed in the small outlet streams from Lake Kyrtj?nn and the reference lake for 6 months, and the concentrations of Pb and Cu in eggs from the Lake Kyrtj?nn stream were significantly higher than in eggs from the reference. More than 90% of Pb accumulated in the egg shell, whereas more than 80% of the Cu and Zn accumulated in the egg interior. Pb in the lake sediments was elevated in the upper 2-5cm layer (410-2700mg/kg d.w), and was predominantly associated with redox sensitive fractions (e.g., organic materials, hydroxides) indicating low potential mobility and bioavailability of the deposited Pb. Only minor amounts of Cu and Sb were deposited in the sediments. The present work showed that the adult brown trout, as well as fertilized eggs and alevins, may be subjected to increased stress due to chronic exposure to Pb, whereas exposure to Cu, Zn and Sb were of less importance.
PubMed ID
27770648 View in PubMed
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Age dependence of natural uranium and thorium concentrations in bone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165657
Source
Health Phys. 2007 Feb;92(2):119-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Dominic Larivière
Ana Paula Packer
Leonora Marro
Chunsheng Li
Jing Chen
R Jack Cornett
Author Affiliation
Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, 775 Brookfield Road, Address Locator 6302D1, Ottawa, ON, Canada, K1A. dominic_lariviere@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Health Phys. 2007 Feb;92(2):119-26
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Background Radiation
Body Burden
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Canada
Humans
Radiation Dosage
Radiometry - methods
Relative Biological Effectiveness
Thorium - analysis
Uranium - analysis
Abstract
The age dependence of the natural concentration of uranium and thorium in the skeleton was investigated using human vertebrae bone collected from two Canadian locations (Winnipeg, Manitoba, and Regina, Saskatchewan). The concentration of both radioelements in digested ashed bone samples was determined using sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The geometric means for uranium level in bones showed a significant statistical difference between the two locations studied. Similarly for thorium, a statistical difference was observed, although this difference was considered marginal. The thorium concentration differed only marginally with respect to age group, indicating that its behavior in the body could be age-independent. Conversely, the uranium level in bones was found to change for the age groups tested, an indication of age-specific deposition. The age profile for uranium was comparable to the calcium turn-over rate, indicating that uranium deposition is probably, in part, dictated by this metabolic process, showing the role of present uptake into the uranium concentration in bones for populations exposed to significant uranium intake.
PubMed ID
17220713 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of elemental composition of bone tissue by the method of laser mass spectrometry to diagnose of human medico-biological characteristics].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160030
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2007 Sep-Oct;50(5):32-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
T G Krymova
V V Kolkutin
N E Beniaev
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2007 Sep-Oct;50(5):32-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone and Bones - chemistry - pathology
Cadaver
Elements
Female
Forensic Anthropology - methods
Forensic Pathology - methods
Humans
Lasers
Male
Mass Spectrometry - methods
Middle Aged
Russia
Abstract
The results of analysis of elemental composition of human bone tissue by the method of laser mass spectrometry are published for the first time. This method makes it possible to detect about 20 elements of bone tissue at once. Quantitative analysis of 1 microgram/gram of an element contained in bone tissue is sufficient to diagnose of human medico-biological characteristics by this method.
PubMed ID
18050689 View in PubMed
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Ancient DNA analysis of human neolithic remains found in northeastern Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175822
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2005 Apr;126(4):458-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
François-Xavier Ricaut
A. Fedoseeva
Christine Keyser-Tracqui
Eric Crubézy
Bertrand Ludes
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire d'Anthropologie Moléculaire, Institut de Médecine Légale, 67085 Strasbourg, France. fx.ricaut@infonie.fr
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2005 Apr;126(4):458-62
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Base Sequence
Bone and Bones - chemistry
DNA - genetics
DNA Primers
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Fossils
Gene Frequency
Geography
Haplotypes - genetics
Humans
Polymorphism, Genetic
Population Dynamics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Siberia
Tandem Repeat Sequences - genetics
Abstract
We successfully extracted DNA from a bone sample of a Neolithic skeleton (dated 3,600 +/- 60 years BP) excavated in northeastern Yakutia (east Siberia). Ancient DNA was analyzed by autosomal STRs (short tandem repeats) and by sequencing of the hypervariable region I (HV1) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region. The STR profile, the mitochondrial haplotype, and the haplogroup determined were compared with those of modern Eurasian and Native American populations. The results showed the affinity of this ancient skeleton with both east Siberian/Asian and Native American populations.
PubMed ID
15756672 View in PubMed
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Ancient mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals complexity of indigenous North American turkey domestication.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145606
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Feb 16;107(7):2807-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2010
Author
Camilla F Speller
Brian M Kemp
Scott D Wyatt
Cara Monroe
William D Lipe
Ursula M Arndt
Dongya Y Yang
Author Affiliation
Ancient DNA Laboratory, Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Feb 16;107(7):2807-12
Date
Feb-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic - genetics
Base Sequence
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Breeding - methods
Cluster analysis
DNA Primers - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Demography
Feces - chemistry
Fossils
Founder Effect
Geography
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Southwestern United States
Species Specificity
Turkeys - genetics
Abstract
Although the cultural and nutritive importance of the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) to precontact Native Americans and contemporary people worldwide is clear, little is known about the domestication of this bird compared to other domesticates. Mitochondrial DNA analysis of 149 turkey bones and 29 coprolites from 38 archaeological sites (200 BC-AD 1800) reveals a unique domesticated breed in the precontact Southwestern United States. Phylogeographic analyses indicate that this domestic breed originated from outside the region, but rules out the South Mexican domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo gallopavo) as a progenitor. A strong genetic bottleneck within the Southwest turkeys also reflects intensive human selection and breeding. This study points to at least two occurrences of turkey domestication in precontact North America and illuminates the intensity and sophistication of New World animal breeding practices.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20133614 View in PubMed
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Assessment of mercury and selenium tissular concentrations and total mercury body burden in 6 Steller sea lion pups from the Aleutian Islands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264321
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2014 May 15;82(1-2):175-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2014
Author
Lucero Correa
Lorrie D Rea
Rebecca Bentzen
Todd M O'Hara
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2014 May 15;82(1-2):175-82
Date
May-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Body Burden
Bone and Bones - chemistry - metabolism
Female
Hair - chemistry - metabolism
Liver - chemistry - metabolism
Male
Mercury - analysis - metabolism
Muscles - chemistry - metabolism
Sea Lions - metabolism
Selenium - analysis - metabolism
Tissue Distribution
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
Concentrations of total mercury ([THg]) and selenium ([TSe]) were measured in several tissue compartments in Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) pups; in addition we determined specific compartment and body burdens of THg. Compartmental and body burdens were calculated by multiplying specific compartment fresh weight by the [THg] (summing compartment burdens equals body burden). In all 6 pup tissue sets (1) highest [THg] was in hair, (2) lowest [THg] was in bone, and (3) pelt, muscle and liver burdens contributed the top three highest percentages of THg body burden. In 5 of 6 pups the Se:Hg molar ratios among compartments ranged from 0.9 to 43.0. The pup with the highest hair [THg] had Se:Hg molar ratios in 9 of 14 compartments that were ? 0.7 potentially indicating an inadequate [TSe] relative to [THg].
Notes
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PubMed ID
24661459 View in PubMed
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Bone fluoride concentrations in beluga whales from Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4843
Source
J Wildl Dis. 1999 Apr;35(2):356-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
I. Mikaelian
C W Qualls
S. De Guise
M W Whaley
D. Martineau
Author Affiliation
Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre, PQ, Canada.
Source
J Wildl Dis. 1999 Apr;35(2):356-60
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - metabolism
Animals
Bone Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - veterinary
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Diet - veterinary
Female
Fluoride Poisoning - epidemiology - veterinary
Fluorides - adverse effects - analysis
Fluorosis, Dental - epidemiology - veterinary
Male
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seawater
Whales - metabolism
Abstract
Beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary have been reported to have dental and bone abnormalities. To determine whether these lesions could be caused by high exposure to fluorides, we measured bone fluoride levels in eight beluga whales stranded on the shores of the St. Lawrence Estuary (Quebec, Canada), and in nine beluga whales killed by Inuit hunters in the Hudson Bay (North Western Territories, Canada). In both groups, fluoride concentrations were higher than those found in terrestrial mammals intoxicated by fluorides. Unexpectedly, fluoride concentration was significantly higher in beluga whales from the Hudson Bay (mean +/- SD: 10.365 +/- 1.098 ppm) than in beluga whales from the St. Lawrence Estuary (4.539 +/- 875 ppm) and was positively correlated with age in the latter population. Differences in diet might explain the differences in fluoride concentrations found between these two populations.
PubMed ID
10231762 View in PubMed
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68 records – page 1 of 7.