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[Bone mineral density of young women with history of anorexia nervosa].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120064
Source
Laeknabladid. 2012 Oct;98(10):523-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Rebekka Guðrun Runarsdottir
Gudlaug Thorsteinsdottir
Olafur Skuli Indridason
Gunnar Sigurdsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Iceland.
Source
Laeknabladid. 2012 Oct;98(10):523-9
Date
Oct-2012
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Anorexia Nervosa - complications - diagnosis
Body mass index
Bone Density
Bone Diseases - etiology - pathology - radiography
Bone remodeling
Bone and Bones - pathology - radiography
Female
Femur Neck - pathology
Hip Joint - pathology
Humans
Iceland
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
A decrease in bone mineral density (BMD) is frequently seen in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). This study was designed to assess BMD of young Icelandic women with current or previous history of AN and identify predictors which might be targets for preventive measures.
The study was retrospective. Participants were women aged 18-40 years, with diagnosis of AN (F50.0, F50.1) attending the anorexia unit at Landspítali - The National University Hospital of Iceland - in 2001-2009, who had undergone measurement of BMD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. A control group consisted of 58 healthy 30 years old women participating in a study of bone health in 2001-2003.
At time of BMD measurement the median body mass index (BMI: kg/m2) in the AN group (n=40) was 17.4 (12.3-25.2) compared to 23.6 (18.1-43.7) in the control group (p
PubMed ID
23043065 View in PubMed
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[Frostbite-induced changes in bones and joints]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51694
Source
Duodecim. 1993;109(1):60-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
O. Ervasti
J. Hassi
J. Manelius
Author Affiliation
Oulun aluetyöterveyslaitos, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Duodecim. 1993;109(1):60-3
Date
1993
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bone Diseases - etiology - pathology
Frostbite - complications
Hand
Humans
Joint Diseases - etiology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
PubMed ID
8013309 View in PubMed
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Pneumatization and otitis media in Greenlandic Inuit before European colonization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4069
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1995 Dec;24(6):330-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
P. Homøe
N. Lynnerup
L T Skovgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Medicine, Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
Source
J Otolaryngol. 1995 Dec;24(6):330-5
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Archaeology
Bone Diseases - etiology - pathology
Female
Greenland
Humans
Inflammation - physiopathology
Inuits
Male
Otitis Media - complications
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skull - pathology
Temporal Bone - pathology
Abstract
A total of 127 Greenlandic Inuit crania from before the European colonization of Greenland and deriving from the West (W), Southeast (SE), and Northeast (NE) coast of Greenland were examined for sequelae of infectious middle ear disease (IMED) and for a relationship between the size of the pneumatized cell area in the temporal bones and cranial morphology. IMED was inferred from the area size of the pneumatized cell system as seen on x-rays. The crania were classified into IMED or non-IMED by applying a statistical model on the distribution of areas. The model designated six crania (4.7%, 95% CI: 1.8-10.0%) as having had IMED, four from the W, one from the SE, and one from the NE. This is lower than the present frequency of IMED in Greenland. One cranium revealed pathology resembling that caused by chronic inflammation (e.g., from cholesteatoma or cancer). The area sizes differed significantly between sexes and between regions, as did some of the cranial measures. This indicated a relationship between cranial morphology and the area size. However, in a multiple regression analysis, cranial morphology only explained 5 to 7% (R2) of the variability in the areas.
PubMed ID
8699597 View in PubMed
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