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A 3-year physical activity intervention program increases the gain in bone mineral and bone width in prepubertal girls but not boys: the prospective copenhagen school child interventions study (CoSCIS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91757
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2008 Oct;83(4):243-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Hasselstrøm H A
Karlsson M K
Hansen S E
Grønfeldt V.
Froberg K.
Andersen L B
Author Affiliation
Institute for Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. henrietteh62@hotmail.com
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2008 Oct;83(4):243-50
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Bone Density - physiology
Bone Development - physiology
Bone and Bones - chemistry - physiology
Child
Denmark
Exercise
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Prospective Studies
Puberty - physiology
Sex Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increasing the amount of time spent in physical education classes on bone mineral accrual and gain in bone size in prepubertal Danish children. A total of 135 boys and 108 girls, aged 6-8 years, were included in a school-based curriculum intervention program where the usual time spent in physical education classes was doubled to four classes (180 min) per week. The control group comprised age-matched children (62 boys and 76 girls) recruited from a separate community who completed the usual Danish school curriculum of physical activity (90 min/week). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to evaluate bone mineral content (BMC; g), bone mineral density (g/cm(2)), and bone width at the calcaneus and distal forearm before and after 3 years of intervention. Anthropometrics and Tanner stages were evaluated on the same occasions. General physical activity was measured with an accelerometer worn for 4 days. In girls, the intervention group had a 12.5% increase (P = 0.04) in distal forearm BMC and a 13.2% increase (P = 0.005) in distal forearm scanned area compared with girls in the control group. No differences were found between the intervention and control groups in boys. Increasing the frequency of physical education classes for prepubertal children is associated with a higher accrual of bone mineral and higher gain in bone size after 3 years in girls but not in boys.
PubMed ID
18839047 View in PubMed
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Absolute fracture risk reporting in clinical practice: a physician-centered survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159036
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2008 Apr;19(4):459-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
W D Leslie
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, 409 Tache Avenue, Winnipeg R2H 2A6 Manitoba, Canada. bleslie@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2008 Apr;19(4):459-63
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Bone Density - physiology
Data Collection - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fractures, Bone - economics - prevention & control - radiography
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Osteoporosis - economics - physiopathology - radiotherapy
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice
Risk Assessment - economics - standards
Specialization - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Non-expert clinical practitioners who had received bone density reports based on 10-year absolute fracture risk were surveyed to determine their response to this new system. Absolute fracture risk reporting was well received and was strongly preferred to traditional T-score-based reporting. Non-specialist physicians were particularly supportive of risk-based bone mineral density (BMD) reporting.
Absolute risk estimation is preferable to risk categorization based upon BMD alone. The objective of this study was to specifically assess the response of non-expert clinical practitioners to this approach.
In January 2006, the Province of Manitoba, Canada, started reporting 10-year osteoporotic fracture risks for patients aged 50 years and older based on the hip T-score, gender, age, and multiple clinical risk factors. In May 2006 and October 2006, a brief anonymous survey was sent to all physicians who had requested a BMD test during 2005 and 206 responses were received.
When asked whether the report contained the information needed to manage patients, the mean score for the absolute fracture risk report was higher than for the T-score-based report (p
PubMed ID
18239957 View in PubMed
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Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (frozen shoulder) produces bone loss in the affected humerus, but long-term bony recovery is good.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205412
Source
Bone. 1998 Jun;22(6):691-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
J. Leppälä
P. Kannus
H. Sievänen
M. Järvinen
I. Vuori
Author Affiliation
Accident and Trauma Research Center, UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Bone. 1998 Jun;22(6):691-4
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bone Density - physiology
Bone Remodeling - physiology
Bursitis - complications - physiopathology - radiography
Female
Finland
Forearm - radiography
Humans
Humerus - physiopathology - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - etiology
Questionnaires
Radius - radiography
Shoulder Joint
Ulna - radiography
Abstract
The objective of the study was to assess the short- and long-term effects of adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder) on the bone mineral density (BMD) of the affected extremity. BMD and clinical status of 22 patients (group A) with active-phase unilateral adhesive capsulitis and 31 patients (group B) with a previous adhesive capsulitis (average 9 years before the examination) were determined. BMD was measured from the proximal humerus, humeral shaft, radial shaft, ulnar shaft, and distal forearm of both upper extremities using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). In group A, the mean BMD of the affected extremity, as compared with that of the unaffected side, was significantly lower in the proximal humerus (-5.6%; p = 0.001) and humeral shaft (-3.0%; p = 0.008). The radial shaft, ulnar shaft, and distal forearm showed no significant side-to-side differences. In contrast, in group B, the affected-to-unaffected side BMD differences were small and statistically insignificant. Compared with the 31 patients in group B, the relative side-to-side BMD difference of the 22 patients with active-phase disease (group A) was significantly lower in the proximal humerus (-5.6% vs. -1.5%, p = 0.009). In the other sites, groups A and B showed no significant differences. In conclusion, this study indicates that adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder results in significant bone loss in the humerus of the affected extremity, but in the long term, capsulitis-induced bone loss shows good recovery.
PubMed ID
9626410 View in PubMed
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Adjuvant denosumab in breast cancer (ABCSG-18): a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265750
Source
Lancet. 2015 Aug 1;386(9992):433-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2015
Author
Michael Gnant
Georg Pfeiler
Peter C Dubsky
Michael Hubalek
Richard Greil
Raimund Jakesz
Viktor Wette
Marija Balic
Ferdinand Haslbauer
Elisabeth Melbinger
Vesna Bjelic-Radisic
Silvia Artner-Matuschek
Florian Fitzal
Christian Marth
Paul Sevelda
Brigitte Mlineritsch
Günther G Steger
Diether Manfreda
Ruth Exner
Daniel Egle
Jonas Bergh
Franz Kainberger
Susan Talbot
Douglas Warner
Christian Fesl
Christian F Singer
Source
Lancet. 2015 Aug 1;386(9992):433-43
Date
Aug-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized - therapeutic use
Aromatase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Austria
Bone Density - physiology
Breast Neoplasms - complications - drug therapy
Double-Blind Method
Female
Fractures, Bone - complications - prevention & control
Humans
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Estrogen - metabolism
Receptors, Progesterone - metabolism
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Adjuvant endocrine therapy compromises bone health in patients with breast cancer, causing osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fractures. Antiresorptive treatments such as bisphosphonates prevent and counteract these side-effects. In this trial, we aimed to investigate the effects of the anti-RANK ligand antibody denosumab in postmenopausal, aromatase inhibitor-treated patients with early-stage hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.
In this prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, postmenopausal patients with early hormone receptor-positive breast cancer receiving treatment with aromatase inhibitors were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either denosumab 60 mg or placebo administered subcutaneously every 6 months in 58 trial centres in Austria and Sweden. Patients were assigned by an interactive voice response system. The randomisation schedule used a randomly permuted block design with block sizes 2 and 4, stratified by type of hospital regarding Hologic device for DXA scans, previous aromatase inhibitor use, and baseline bone mineral density. Patients, treating physicians, investigators, data managers, and all study personnel were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was time from randomisation to first clinical fracture, analysed by intention to treat. As an additional sensitivity analysis, we also analysed the primary endpoint on the per-protocol population. Patients were treated until the prespecified number of 247 first clinical fractures was reached. This trial is ongoing (patients are in follow-up) and is registered with the European Clinical Trials Database, number 2005-005275-15, and with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00556374.
Between Dec 18, 2006, and July 22, 2013, 3425 eligible patients were enrolled into the trial, of whom 3420 were randomly assigned to receive denosumab 60 mg (n=1711) or placebo (n=1709) subcutaneously every 6 months. Compared with the placebo group, patients in the denosumab group had a significantly delayed time to first clinical fracture (hazard ratio [HR] 0·50 [95% CI 0·39-0·65], p
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2015 Aug 1;386(9992):409-1026040500
PubMed ID
26040499 View in PubMed
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Adolescence physical activity is associated with higher tibial pQCT bone values in adulthood after 28-years of follow-up--the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269110
Source
Bone. 2015 Jun;75:77-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
S. Tolonen
H. Sievänen
V. Mikkilä
R. Telama
M. Oikonen
M. Laaksonen
J. Viikari
M. Kähönen
O T Raitakari
Source
Bone. 2015 Jun;75:77-83
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bone Density - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Tibia - growth & development - radiography
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Young Adult
Abstract
High peak bone mass and strong bone phenotype are known to be partly explained by physical activity during growth but there are few prospective studies on this topic. In this 28-year follow-up of Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study cohort, we assessed whether habitual childhood and adolescence physical activity or inactivity at the age of 3-18 years were associated with adult phenotype of weight-bearing tibia and the risk of low-energy fractures. Baseline physical activity and data on clinical, nutritional and lifestyle factors were assessed separately for females and males aged 3-6-years (N=395-421) and 9-18-years (N=923-965). At the age of 31-46-years, the prevalence of low-energy fractures was assessed with a questionnaire and several tibial traits were measured with pQCT (bone mineral content (BMC; mg), total and cortical cross-sectional areas (mm(2)), trabecular (for the distal site only) and cortical (for the shaft only) bone densities (mg/cm(3)), stress-strain index (SSI; mm(3), for the shaft only), bone strength index (BSI; mg(2)/cm(4), for the distal site only) and the cortical strength index (CSI, for the shaft only)). For the statistical analysis, each bone trait was categorized as below the cohort median or the median and above and the adjusted odds ratios (OR) were determined. In females, frequent physical activity at the age of 9-18-years was associated with higher adulthood values of BSI, total and cortical areas, BMC, CSI and SSI at the tibia independently of many health and lifestyle factors (ORs 0.33-0.53, P=0.05; P-values for trend 0.002-0.05). Cortical density at the tibial shaft showed the opposite trend (P-value for trend 0.03). Similarly in males, frequent physical activity was associated with higher values of adult total and cortical areas and CSI at the tibia (ORs 0.48-0.53, P=0.05; P-values for trend 0.01-0.02). However, there was no evidence that childhood or adolescence physical activity was associated with lower risk of low energy fractures during the follow-up. In conclusion, frequent habitual physical activity in adolescence seems to confer benefits on tibial bone size and geometry in adulthood.
PubMed ID
25697084 View in PubMed
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Age discrimination in osteoporosis screening--data from the Aalborg University Hospital Record for Osteoporosis Risk Assessment (AURORA).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259025
Source
Maturitas. 2014 Apr;77(4):330-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Stig Andersen
Peter Laurberg
Source
Maturitas. 2014 Apr;77(4):330-5
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ageism
Bone Density - physiology
Denmark
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - diagnosis - physiopathology
Risk factors
Abstract
Old age carries a markedly increased risk of osteoporotic fractures with subsequent disability, dependency and premature death. Timely detection and treatment reduces fracture risk and particular attention should be drawn to age.
To assess the impact of age on referral for osteoporosis screening.
Dual energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) at the Osteoporosis Clinic in North Denmark was reorganised from 2010. Risk factors, anthropometry and bone mineral density were recorded and considered in the reply and recommendations to the referring doctor. We report data from the 8,131 consecutive evaluations in 7914 individuals at the Osteoporosis Clinic from January 1st 2010 through December 31st 2012.
Risk factor data were available in >96% and DXA in 98%. Population DXA frequency decreased markedly after the 7th decade and was performed yearly in 1.2% of the population aged >80 years in North Denmark. The >80 years group had more fragility fractures and lower T-scores (p80 years was a dominant risk factor for fragility fracture (OR 2.4, 95% CI 2.0-2.9; p
PubMed ID
24480671 View in PubMed
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Age-related loss of proximal femoral strength in elderly men and women: the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility Study--Reykjavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128686
Source
Bone. 2012 Mar;50(3):743-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
T F Lang
S. Sigurdsson
G. Karlsdottir
D. Oskarsdottir
A. Sigmarsdottir
J. Chengshi
J. Kornak
T B Harris
G. Sigurdsson
B Y Jonsson
K. Siggeirsdottir
G. Eiriksdottir
V. Gudnason
J H Keyak
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143-0946, USA. thomas.lang@ucsf.edu
Source
Bone. 2012 Mar;50(3):743-8
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bone Density - physiology
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Femur - physiology - radiography
Hip Fractures - etiology - physiopathology - radiography
Humans
Male
Sex Factors
Abstract
The risk of hip fracture rises rapidly with age, and is particularly high in women. This increase in fracture risk reflects both the age-related change in the risk of falling and decrements in the strength of the proximal femur. To better understand the extent to which proximal femoral density, structure and strength change with age as a function of gender, we have carried out a longitudinal analysis of proximal femoral volumetric quantitative computed tomographic (vQCT) images in men and women, analyzing changes in trabecular and cortical bone properties, and using subject-specific finite element modeling (FEM) to estimate changes in bone strength. In the AGES-Reykjavik Study vQCT scans of the hip were performed at a baseline visit in 2002-2006 and at a second visit 5.05±0.25 years later. From these, 223 subjects (111 men, 112 women, aged 68-87 years) were randomly selected. The subjects were evaluated for longitudinal changes in three bone variables assessed in a region similar to the total femur region quantified by DXA: areal bone mineral density (aBMD), trabecular volumetric bone mineral density (tBMD) and the ratio of cortical to total tissue volume (cvol/ivol). They were also evaluated for changes in bone strength using FEM models of the left proximal femur. Models were analyzed under single-limb stance loading (F(Stance)), which approximates normal physiologic loading of the hip, as well as a load approximating a fall onto the posterolateral aspect of the greater trochanter (F(Fall)). We computed five-year absolute and percentage changes in aBMD, tBMD, cvol/ivol, F(Fall) and F(Stance). The Mann-Whitney Test was employed to compare changes in bone variables between genders and the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used to compare changes in bone strength between loading conditions. Multiple (linear) regression was employed to determine the association of changes in F(Fall) and F(Stance) with baseline age and five-year weight loss. Both men and women showed declines in indices of proximal femoral density and structure (aBMD: men -3.9±6.0%, women -6.1±6.2%; tBMD: men -14.8±20.3%, women -23.9±26.8%; cvol/ivol: men -2.6±4.6%, women -4.7±4.8%, gender difference: p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22178403 View in PubMed
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Altered body composition profiles in young adults with childhood-onset inflammatory bowel disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311049
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2020 Feb; 55(2):169-177
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Feb-2020
Author
Gudmundur Vignir Sigurdsson
Susanne Schmidt
Dan Mellström
Claes Ohlsson
Magnus Karlsson
Mattias Lorentzon
Robert Saalman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg and Queen Silviás Children Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2020 Feb; 55(2):169-177
Date
Feb-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adolescent
Adult
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Bone Density - physiology
Bone Diseases, Metabolic - etiology
Female
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - physiopathology
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Background: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often develop alterations in body composition in terms of their proportions of lean mass and fat mass, as well as reduced bone mineral density (BMD). However, there are limited data on the skeletal muscle index (SMI) and percentage fat (fat %) for young adults with childhood-onset IBD. Our aim was to investigate the body compositions of these patients, with the focus on SMI and fat %.Methods: Body composition was estimated by dual x-ray absorptiometry for 94 young adults with childhood-onset IBD aged 18-27?years, 65 of whom had ulcerative colitis. The Z-scores for SMI, fat %, and BMD were calculated using the normative data from 1,289 individuals with corresponding age. Based on the SMI and fat % Z-scores, each patient was classified as having a body composition profile that was: (i) normal; (ii) obese (fat % Z-score >1); (iii) myopenic (SMI Z-score
PubMed ID
32008409 View in PubMed
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Ankle fractures do not predict osteoporotic fractures in women with or without diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134581
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2012 Mar;23(3):957-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
J M Pritchard
L M Giangregorio
G. Ioannidis
A. Papaioannou
J D Adachi
W D Leslie
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. pritcjm@mcmaster.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2012 Mar;23(3):957-62
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged
Ankle Injuries - epidemiology - physiopathology
Body mass index
Bone Density - physiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Abstract
It is not clear whether ankle fractures predict future osteoporotic fractures in women, and whether diabetes influences this relationship. We found that a prior ankle fracture does not predict subsequent osteoporotic fractures in women with or without diabetes.
We aimed to determine: (1) whether a prior ankle fracture was a risk factor for a subsequent major osteoporotic fracture in older women; (2) whether this risk was modified by the presence of diabetes; (3) the risk factors for ankle fracture in older women.
We identified 3,054 women age 50 years and older with diabetes and 9,151 matched controls using the Manitoba Bone Density Program database. Multivariable regression models were used to examine factors associated with prior ankle fracture, and the importance of prior ankle fracture as a predictor of subsequent major osteoporotic fracture during a mean 4.8 years of observation.
A prior ankle fracture was not a significant predictor of subsequent major osteoporotic fracture for women with diabetes (hazard ratio [HR] 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.68-1.83; p = 0.623) or women without diabetes (HR 1.16; 95% CI, 0.79-1.71; p = 0.460), and there was no interaction between diabetes and ankle fracture after pooling all women in the cohort (p = 0.971). The presence of diabetes was not independently associated with prior ankle fracture (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.14 [95% CI, 0.93-1.38], p = 0.200), whereas higher body mass index (adjusted OR 1.04 per standard deviation increase [95% CI, 1.03-1.06], p 6 ambulatory diagnostic groups) (adjusted OR 1.81 [95% CI, 1.40-2.36], p
PubMed ID
21562874 View in PubMed
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222 records – page 1 of 23.