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The A1330V polymorphism of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene (LRP5) associates with low peak bone mass in young healthy men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165637
Source
Bone. 2007 Apr;40(4):1006-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Anne Saarinen
Ville-Valtteri Välimäki
Matti J Välimäki
Eliisa Löyttyniemi
Kirsi Auro
Piia Uusen
Mairi Kuris
Anna-Elina Lehesjoki
Outi Mäkitie
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics and Department of Medical Genetics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Bone. 2007 Apr;40(4):1006-12
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alleles
Bone Density - genetics
Calcifediol - blood
Finland
Fractures, Bone - etiology - genetics
Gene Frequency
Humans
LDL-Receptor Related Proteins - genetics
Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-5
Male
Military Personnel
Osteoporosis - etiology - genetics
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk factors
Abstract
Polymorphisms in the gene coding for low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) contribute to variation in bone mass in the general population. Whether this is due to influence on bone mass acquisition or on bone loss thereafter has not been established.
We studied the association of LRP5 polymorphisms with peak bone mass in young men. The study included 235 Finnish men, aged 18.3 to 20.6 years. Lifestyle factors and fracture history were recorded. Bone mineral content (BMC), density (BMD) and scan area were measured for the lumbar spine and proximal femur by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Blood and urine were collected for determination of bone turnover markers, serum 25-OHD and PTH. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood for genetic analysis of LRP5. Ten single nucleotide polymorphisms in LRP5 were analyzed and correlated with bone parameters.
Only the A1330V polymorphism of LRP5 significantly associated with bone parameters. In comparison with subjects with the AlaAla genotype (n=215), those with AlaVal genotype (n=20) had lower femoral neck BMC (P=0.029) and BMD (P=0.012), trochanter BMC (P=0.0067) and BMD (P=0.015), and total hip BMC (P=0.0044) and BMD (P=0.0089). Fracture history was similar for the genotypes.
The polymorphic valine variant at position 1330 of LRP5 was significantly associated with reduced BMC and BMD values in healthy young Finnish men. The results provide evidence for the crucial role of LRP5 in peak bone mass acquisition.
PubMed ID
17223614 View in PubMed
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A common methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (C677T) polymorphism is associated with low bone mineral density and increased fracture incidence after menopause: longitudinal data from the Danish osteoporosis prevention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186025
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2003 Apr;18(4):723-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Bo Abrahamsen
Jonna Skov Madsen
Charlotte Landbo Tofteng
Lis Stilgren
Else Marie Bladbjerg
Søren Risom Kristensen
Kim Brixen
Leif Mosekilde
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. B.abrahamsen@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2003 Apr;18(4):723-9
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Bone Density - genetics - physiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Fractures, Bone - enzymology - epidemiology - genetics
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2) - genetics - physiology
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - enzymology - genetics - prevention & control
Polymorphism, Genetic
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
A polymorphism in the gene encoding methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) has recently been associated with bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal Japanese women. It is not known whether this effect is also present in European populations and whether it is caused by lower peak bone mass or accelerated postmenopausal bone loss. MTHFR genotyping was done in 1748 healthy postmenopausal Danish women participating in a prospective study of risk factors for osteoporosis. At the time of enrollment, 3-24 months after last menstrual period, the less prevalent genotype (TT, 8.7% of the population) was associated with significantly lower BMD at the femoral neck (ANOVA, p
PubMed ID
12674333 View in PubMed
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Genetic determinants of trabecular and cortical volumetric bone mineral densities and bone microstructure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116079
Source
PLoS Genet. 2013;9(2):e1003247
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lavinia Paternoster
Mattias Lorentzon
Terho Lehtimäki
Joel Eriksson
Mika Kähönen
Olli Raitakari
Marika Laaksonen
Harri Sievänen
Jorma Viikari
Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen
Dan Mellström
Magnus Karlsson
Osten Ljunggren
Elin Grundberg
John P Kemp
Adrian Sayers
Maria Nethander
David M Evans
Liesbeth Vandenput
Jon H Tobias
Claes Ohlsson
Author Affiliation
MRC Centre for Causal Analyses in Translational Epidemiology, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
Source
PLoS Genet. 2013;9(2):e1003247
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Alleles
Bone Density - genetics
Bone and Bones - radiography - ultrastructure
Fractures, Bone - genetics - radiography
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Osteoblasts - metabolism
Osteoporosis - genetics - radiography
RANK Ligand - genetics
Sweden
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
Most previous genetic epidemiology studies within the field of osteoporosis have focused on the genetics of the complex trait areal bone mineral density (aBMD), not being able to differentiate genetic determinants of cortical volumetric BMD (vBMD), trabecular vBMD, and bone microstructural traits. The objective of this study was to separately identify genetic determinants of these bone traits as analysed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Separate GWA meta-analyses for cortical and trabecular vBMDs were performed. The cortical vBMD GWA meta-analysis (n?=?5,878) followed by replication (n?=?1,052) identified genetic variants in four separate loci reaching genome-wide significance (RANKL, rs1021188, p?=?3.6×10?¹4; LOC285735, rs271170, p?=?2.7×10?¹²; OPG, rs7839059, p?=?1.2×10?¹°; and ESR1/C6orf97, rs6909279, p?=?1.1×10??). The trabecular vBMD GWA meta-analysis (n?=?2,500) followed by replication (n?=?1,022) identified one locus reaching genome-wide significance (FMN2/GREM2, rs9287237, p?=?1.9×10??). High-resolution pQCT analyses, giving information about bone microstructure, were available in a subset of the GOOD cohort (n?=?729). rs1021188 was significantly associated with cortical porosity while rs9287237 was significantly associated with trabecular bone fraction. The genetic variant in the FMN2/GREM2 locus was associated with fracture risk in the MrOS Sweden cohort (HR per extra T allele 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.60-0.93) and GREM2 expression in human osteoblasts. In conclusion, five genetic loci associated with trabecular or cortical vBMD were identified. Two of these (FMN2/GREM2 and LOC285735) are novel bone-related loci, while the other three have previously been reported to be associated with aBMD. The genetic variants associated with cortical and trabecular bone parameters differed, underscoring the complexity of the genetics of bone parameters. We propose that a genetic variant in the RANKL locus influences cortical vBMD, at least partly, via effects on cortical porosity, and that a genetic variant in the FMN2/GREM2 locus influences GREM2 expression in osteoblasts and thereby trabecular number and thickness as well as fracture risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23437003 View in PubMed
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No major effect of estrogen receptor gene polymorphisms on bone mineral density or bone loss in postmenopausal Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199108
Source
Bone. 2000 Feb;26(2):111-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
Y Z Bagger
H L Jørgensen
A M Heegaard
L. Bayer
L. Hansen
C. Hassager
Author Affiliation
Center for Clinical and Basic Research, Ballerup, Denmark. yb@ccbr.dk
Source
Bone. 2000 Feb;26(2):111-6
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alleles
Base Sequence
Bone Density - genetics - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
DNA Primers - genetics
Denmark
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Genotype
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - genetics - metabolism
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Receptors, Estrogen - genetics
Abstract
The polymorphisms of the estrogen receptor (ER) gene defined by the restriction enodonucleases PvuII and XbaI have recently been reported to be associated with bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women. To investigate the possible relation of the PvuII and XbaI restriction fragment-length polymorphisms of the ER gene with BMD in Danish postmenopausal women, two studies were undertaken: 1) a cross-sectional study of 499 postmenopausal women, where the ER genotypes and alleles were related to BMD of the hip, spine, and lower forearm; and 2) a longitudinal study of 101 postmenopausal women followed up for 18 years. In the latter study, late postmenopausal bone loss in the hip and spine was determined over a period of 6 years in women (mean age of 63 to 69 years), and long-term postmenopausal bone loss in the lower forearm was determined over a period of 18 years in women (mean age of 51 to 69 years). Genotyping was performed through the restriction cleavage of polymerase chain reaction-amplified genomic DNA with the two restriction enzymes, PvuII and XbaI. Restriction fragment-length polymorphisms were represented as P or p (PvuII) and X or x (XbaI), with the lower case letters signifying the presence of the restriction site. The frequencies of the ER genotypes were similar to previously published genotype frequencies in Caucasian and Asian populations. No significant effect of the ER genotypes or alleles on BMD was found at any site, nor was there a relation between ER genotypes and the rate of bone loss either in the hip and spine over 6 years, or in the lower forearm over 18 years. In conclusion, we could not demonstrate any major effect of the ER gene polymorphisms on BMD or rate of bone loss in healthy postmenopausal Danish women.
PubMed ID
10678404 View in PubMed
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[The study of rs1800012 polymorphism of the alphal-chain collagen type 1 gene in Moscow women and children with different level of bone strength].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270377
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2015;84(4):74-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
N M Shilina
E Yu Sorokina
T A Ivanushkina
A I Safronova
M V Gmoshinskaya
I Ya Kon
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2015;84(4):74-81
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alleles
Bone Density - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Collagen Type I - genetics
Densitometry
Female
Genotype
Humans
Moscow
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Pregnancy
Abstract
The frequency of rs1800012 polymorphism of alpha1-chains of type 1 collagen gene (COL1A1) was studied by real-time PCR in 422 Moscow women and children, including pregnant women (n=96), lactating (n=29) and non-pregnant women (n=28) and preschool children (2-6 years, n=76) and school children (7-16 years, n=193) with different levels of bone strength (BS) as determined by ultrasound densitometry. It was found that the decrease in the value of the BS (Z-score
PubMed ID
26852534 View in PubMed
Less detail

Variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism in parathyroid hormone-related protein as predictor of peak bone mass in young healthy Finnish males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157624
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2008 May;158(5):755-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Ajay Gupta
Ville-Valtteri Välimäki
Matti J Välimäki
Eliisa Löyttyniemi
Marilyn Richard
Prasanna L Bukka
David Goltzman
Andrew C Karaplis
Author Affiliation
Osta Biotechnologies Inc., Pointe Claire, Québec, H9A 3H2 Canada.
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2008 May;158(5):755-64
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alleles
Animals
Base Sequence
Bone Density - genetics
COS Cells
Cercopithecus aethiops
Finland
Genetic Variation
Humans
Lumbar Vertebrae - ultrasonography
Male
Molecular Sequence Data
Osteoblasts - cytology - physiology
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - genetics
Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Tandem Repeat Sequences
Abstract
Mice with osteoblast-specific deletion of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) exhibit impaired recruitment and increased apoptosis of osteogenic cells resulting in decreased bone formation and premature osteoporosis. The PTHrP levels within the bone microenvironment are therefore critical in influencing bone mass acquisition. Whether this is applicable in humans has not been established. Here, we studied the association of a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism in PTHrP with peak bone mass.
Enrolled in the study were 234 young Finnish males, with median age of 19.6 years (range 18.3-20.6 years). Lifestyle factors, serum bone markers, osteodensitometric measurements (lumbar spine and hip) and calcaneal quantitative ultrasound readings were obtained. The PTHrP VNTR length was determined by the PCR amplification of genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood and correlated to bone parameters by the multiple regression models.
The presence of at least one 252 bp allele was associated with increased lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD; P
PubMed ID
18426836 View in PubMed
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Vitamin D binding protein genotype is associated with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and PTH concentrations, as well as bone health in children and adolescents in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105061
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(1):e87292
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Minna Pekkinen
Elisa Saarnio
Heli T Viljakainen
Elina Kokkonen
Jette Jakobsen
Kevin Cashman
Outi Mäkitie
Christel Lamberg-Allardt
Author Affiliation
Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland ; Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(1):e87292
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alleles
Bone Density - genetics
Bone and Bones
Calcium, Dietary - metabolism
Child
Female
Finland
Genotype
Humans
Male
Parathyroid Hormone - blood - genetics - metabolism
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood - genetics - metabolism
Vitamin D-Binding Protein - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
Vitamin D binding protein (DBP)/group-specific component (Gc), correlates positively with serum vitamin D metabolites, and phenotype influences serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25(OH)D) concentration. The protein isoform has been associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and increased fracture risk. We examined the role of GC genotypes in S-25(OH)D status and BMD in 231 Finnish children and adolescents aged 7-19 yr. BMD was measured with DXA from lumbar spine (LS), total hip, and whole body, and for 175 subjects, radial volumetric BMD was measured with pQCT. Background characteristic and total dietary intakes of vitamin D and calcium were collected. The concentrations of 25(OH)D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium and other markers of calcium homeostasis were determined from blood and urine. Genotyping was based on single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs4588) in the GC gene. The genotype distribution was: GC 1/1 68%, GC 1/2 26% and GC 2/2 6%. A significant difference emerged in 25(OH)D and PTH concentrations between the genotypes, (p?=?0.001 and 0.028 respectively, ANCOVA). There was also a linear trend in: Gc 2/2 had the lowest 25(OH)D and PTH concentrations (p?=?0.025 and 0.012, respectively). Total hip bone mineral content was associated with GC genotype (BMC) (p?=?0.05, ANCOVA) in boys. In regression analysis, after adjusting for relevant covariates, GC genotype was associated with LS BMC and strength and strain index (SSI) Z-score in both genders, and LS BMD in boys. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates the association between GC genotypes and S-25(OH)D and PTH concentrations. The results show the influence of DBP genetic variation on bone mass accrual in adolescence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24498064 View in PubMed
Less detail

Vitamin D receptor alleles do not predict bone mineral density or bone loss in Danish perimenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205583
Source
Bone. 1998 May;22(5):571-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
T S Hansen
B. Abrahamsen
F L Henriksen
A P Hermann
L B Jensen
M. Hørder
J. Gram
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Clinical Genetics, Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Bone. 1998 May;22(5):571-5
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Alleles
Bone Density - genetics - physiology
Bone Development - genetics - physiology
Calcitriol - blood
Calcium - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Femur - physiology
Follow-Up Studies
Genotype
Humans
Hydroxyproline - urine
Longitudinal Studies
Lumbar Vertebrae - physiology
Middle Aged
Osteocalcin - blood
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - genetics
Premenopause - physiology
Receptors, Calcitriol - genetics - physiology
Abstract
A BsmI restriction enzyme polymorphism in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene has been reported to be associated with bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover. However, findings in other studies suggest the presence of considerable interaction by race, body size, and environmental factors. Therefore, we VDR BsmI genotyped 200 healthy perimenopausal Danish white women (mean age 50.8 years, mean calcium intake 900 mg/day) in a comprehensive, longitudinal, community-based population study. Bone loss was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) using cross-calibrated Hologic QDR-1000W and QDR-2000 densitometers, with a mean follow-up period of 4 years (range 1-5 years). Despite a distribution of genotypes similar to that of other white populations (28% bb, 49% Bb, 23% BB), VDR genotypes were not associated with lumbar or femoral baseline BMD, subsequent bone loss rates, or biochemical markers of bone metabolism (bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, urinary hydroxyproline, and serum osteocalcin). Controlling for body size, calcium intake, and serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] did not alter this finding. The possible existence of a threshold effect was subsequently investigated by restricting analysis to women with low serum 25(OH)D3 levels or low calcium intake. VDR BsmI genotypes showed no significant impact on bone density or bone loss in healthy Danish early postmenopausal women, even when allowance was made for calcium intake, serum 25(OH)D3, and body size.
PubMed ID
9600794 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.