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570 records – page 1 of 57.

About the strains caused by a marathon race to fitness joggers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250080
Source
J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 1977 Mar;17(1):49-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1977

Acclimatization to cold in man induced by frequent scuba diving in cold water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293858
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1968 Feb;24(2):177-81.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968

Accuracy of parents in measuring body temperature with a tympanic thermometer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176648
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2005 Jan 11;6(1):3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-11-2005
Author
Joan L Robinson
Hsing Jou
Donald W Spady
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and Stollery Children's Hospital, 2C3 Walter MacKenzie Centre, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2B7 Canada. jr3@ualberta.ca
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2005 Jan 11;6(1):3
Date
Jan-11-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alberta
Body Temperature - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Fever - diagnosis - nursing
Humans
Infant
Monitoring, Physiologic - instrumentation - nursing
Nursing Assessment
Parents
Predictive value of tests
Reference Standards
Sensitivity and specificity
Thermography - instrumentation - standards
Thermometers - standards
Tympanic Membrane - physiology
Abstract
It is now common for parents to measure tympanic temperatures in children. The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of these measurements.
Parents and then nurses measured the temperature of 60 children with a tympanic thermometer designed for home use (home thermometer). The reference standard was a temperature measured by a nurse with a model of tympanic thermometer commonly used in hospitals (hospital thermometer). A difference of >or= 0.5 degrees C was considered clinically significant. A fever was defined as a temperature >or= 38.5 degrees C.
The mean absolute difference between the readings done by the parent and the nurse with the home thermometer was 0.44 +/- 0.61 degrees C, and 33% of the readings differed by >or= 0.5 degrees C. The mean absolute difference between the readings done by the parent with the home thermometer and the nurse with the hospital thermometer was 0.51 +/- 0.63 degrees C, and 72 % of the readings differed by >or= 0.5 degrees C. Using the home thermometer, parents detected fever with a sensitivity of 76% (95% CI 50-93%), a specificity of 95% (95% CI 84-99%), a positive predictive value of 87% (95% CI 60-98%), and a negative predictive value of 91% (95% CI 79-98 %). In comparing the readings the nurse obtained from the two different tympanic thermometers, the mean absolute difference was 0.24 +/- 0.22 degrees C. Nurses detected fever with a sensitivity of 94% (95 % CI 71-100 %), a specificity of 88% (95% CI 75-96 %), a positive predictive value of 76% (95% CI 53-92%), and a negative predictive value of 97% (95%CI 87-100 %) using the home thermometer. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the three sets of readings was 0.80, and the consistency of readings was not affected by the body temperature.
The readings done by parents with a tympanic thermometer designed for home use differed a clinically significant amount from the reference standard (readings done by nurses with a model of tympanic thermometer commonly used in hospitals) the majority of the time, and parents failed to detect fever about one-quarter of the time. Tympanic readings reported by parents should be interpreted with great caution.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15644134 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and failure of adaptation to extreme natural environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5798
Source
Forensic Sci. 1975 Feb;5(1):81-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1975
Author
A W Sloan
Source
Forensic Sci. 1975 Feb;5(1):81-9
Date
Feb-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Anoxia
Arctic Regions
Body Temperature Regulation
Environment
Frostbite
Heat Exhaustion
Humans
Hypothermia
Tropical Climate
Abstract
Although the environmental stresses to which man is subjected on the ground are less than those commonly encountered in aviation or under water, they may still exceed an individual's powers of adaptation. Extremes of temperature, commonly encountered in the Arctic or the tropics, may occur in regions of normally temperate climate and lead to failure of temperature regulation, resulting in hypothermia, frostbite, heat exhaustion, or heat stroke. High mountains impose additional hazards due to high winds and lack of oxygen, and deep mines are dangerous work-places because of high temperature and humidity. Some physiological acclimatization occurs in extreme natural environments and the dangers may be reduced by appropriate clothing, diet and behaviour.
PubMed ID
1132866 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Scientific American. 1966 Jan;214(1):94-101.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966
Source
Scientific American. 1966 Jan;214(1):94-101.
Date
1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization
Animals
Body temperature
Regulation
Cold Climate
Mammals
PubMed ID
5948081 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptation to cold in arctic and tropical mammals and birds in relation to body temperature, insulation, and basal metabolic rate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301686
Source
Biological Bulletin. 1950 Oct;99(2):259-71.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1950
Author
Scholander, P.F.
Hock, R.
Walters, V.
Irving, L.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Biological Bulletin. 1950 Oct;99(2):259-71.
Date
1950
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization
Animals
Arctic Regions
Basal Metabolism
Birds
Body temperature
Cold Temperature
Mammals
PubMed ID
14791423 View in PubMed
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570 records – page 1 of 57.