Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4947 records – page 1 of 495.

1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273208
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Elizaveta Chabanova
Ehm Astrid Andersson
Johanne Dam Ohrt
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Henrik S Thomsen
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood
Fatty Liver - pathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Male
Muscles - pathology
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - blood - pathology
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Puberty
Sex Factors
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Abstract
This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children.
Fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years.
In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences of hepatic and muscular steatosis were 31% and 68%, respectively, whereas the prevalences in 40 lean children were 3% and 10%, respectively. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index z-score (BMI SDS), and pubertal development showed that the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 4.2 (95%CI: [1.8; 10.2], p = 0.0009) when hepatic steatosis was present. Comparing the simultaneous presence of hepatic and muscular steatosis with no presence of steatosis, the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 5.8 (95%CI: [2.0; 18.6], p = 0.002). No significant associations between muscle fat and dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, or blood pressure were observed. Liver and muscle fat, adjusted for age, sex, BMI SDS, and pubertal development, associated to BMI SDS and glycosylated hemoglobin, while only liver fat associated to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipid associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased cardiovascular disease risk.
Notes
Cites: Child Obes. 2012 Dec;8(6):533-4123181919
Cites: Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Aug;6(3-4):188-9621529264
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2014 Jan;38(1):40-523828099
Cites: Pediatr Diabetes. 2014 May;15(3):151-6124754463
Cites: Semin Liver Dis. 2001;21(1):3-1611296695
Cites: Pediatr Clin North Am. 2011 Dec;58(6):1375-92, x22093857
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Feb;20(2):371-521869763
Cites: AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2012 Jul;199(1):2-722733887
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Jul;97(7):E1099-10522508709
Cites: Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2009 Feb;19(2):146-5219171470
Cites: Pediatr Diabetes. 2014 Sep;15 Suppl 20:4-1725182305
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 Feb;25(2):177-8411410817
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2001 Dec;86(12):5755-6111739435
Cites: Diabetes. 2002 Apr;51(4):1022-711916921
Cites: Circulation. 2003 Mar 25;107(11):1562-612654618
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Sep 20;362(9388):951-714511928
Cites: Pediatrics. 2004 Aug;114(2 Suppl 4th Report):555-7615286277
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Oct;28(10):1257-6315278103
Cites: Nutr Rev. 1981 Feb;39(2):43-557010232
Cites: Stat Med. 1992 Jul;11(10):1305-191518992
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 Oct;58(4):463-78379501
Cites: Diabetes. 1997 Jun;46(6):983-89166669
Cites: Diabetologia. 1999 Jan;42(1):113-610027589
Cites: Diabetes. 1999 Oct;48(10):2039-4410512371
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 Mar;14(3):357-6716648604
Cites: Pediatrics. 2006 Oct;118(4):1388-9317015527
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2007 Jan;30(1):89-9417192339
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jul;61(7):877-8317151586
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Jul 15;118(3):277-8318591439
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2009 Feb;32(2):342-718957533
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Sep;94(9):3440-719531593
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Jun 1;171(11):1195-20220457571
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2010 Sep;163(3):413-920584996
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Dec;95(12):5189-9820829185
Cites: J Clin Res Pediatr Endocrinol. 2010;2(3):100-621274322
Cites: Diabetologia. 2011 Apr;54(4):869-7521181394
Cites: Abdom Imaging. 2013 Apr;38(2):315-922736224
PubMed ID
26252778 View in PubMed
Less detail

ß2-adrenergic receptor Thr164Ile polymorphism, obesity, and diabetes: comparison with FTO, MC4R, and TMEM18 polymorphisms in more than 64,000 individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125626
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Jun;97(6):E1074-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Mette Thomsen
Morten Dahl
Anne Tybjærg-Hansen
Børge G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Jun;97(6):E1074-9
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Male
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Proteins - genetics
Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4 - genetics
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 - genetics
Risk factors
Abstract
The ß(2)-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) influences regulation of energy balance by stimulating catecholamine-induced lipolysis in adipose tissue. The rare functional ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile) polymorphism could therefore influence risk of obesity and subsequently diabetes.
We tested the hypothesis that the ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile) polymorphism associates with risk of obesity and diabetes and compared effect sizes with those of FTO(rs9939609), MC4R(rs17782313), and TMEM18(rs6548238).
We conducted a population-based cohort study in Copenhagen, Denmark.
We genotyped more than 64,000 individuals from the Danish general population.
We evaluated body mass index (BMI), obesity (BMI =30 kg/m(2)), and diabetes.
Rare allele frequencies were 0.02 for T for ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile), 0.40 for A for FTOrs9939609, 0.25 for C for MC4Rrs17782313, and 0.20 for T for TMEM18rs6548238. For rare vs. common homozygotes, odds ratio for obesity was 3.32 (95% confidence interval = 1.08-10.19) for ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile), 1.42 (1.35-1.52) for FTOrs9939609, 1.18 (1.06-1.30) for MC4Rrs17782313, and 1.28 (1.10-1.50) for TMEM18rs6548238 (common vs. rare). Corresponding odds ratios for diabetes were 1.85 (0.24-14.29), 1.22 (1.07-1.39), 0.96 (0.80-1.16), and 1.61 (1.17-2.22), respectively. After adjustment for BMI, only TMEM18rs6548238 remained associated with diabetes. BMI was increased in rare vs. common homozygotes in FTOrs9939609, MC4Rrs17782313, and TMEM18rs6548238 (common vs. rare) but not in ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile).
Our results suggest that ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile) rare vs. common homozygotes are not significantly associated with an increase in BMI measured continuously but may be associated with an increased risk of obesity. Also, TMEM18rs6548238 associated with risk of diabetes after adjustment for BMI. These findings need confirmation in other studies.
PubMed ID
22466342 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 5-year longitudinal study of the relationship between the wish to be thinner, lifestyle behaviours and disturbed eating in 9-20-year old girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99387
Source
Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2010 May;18(3):207-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Josefin Westerberg-Jacobson
Birgitta Edlund
Ata Ghaderi
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Uppsala University, BMC, Husargatan, Uppsala, Sweden. josefin.westerberg-jacobson@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2010 May;18(3):207-19
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Image
Body mass index
Child
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Eating Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Style
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this 5-year longitudinal study of 593 girls (9-20-year-old) was to examine whether the internalization of the thinness ideal in terms of 'a wish to be thinner' might be related to lifestyle factors and longitudinally increase the risk of disturbed eating over time. Results showed that a wish to be thinner was related to lifestyle factors, eating attitudes and body mass index (BMI) longitudinally. Girls who wished to be thinner dieted more often, thought that they would be more popular if they were thinner, skipped meals, were eating breakfast more often alone and had a higher BMI compared to the girls without such a wish. Girls who wished to be thinner were 4 times more likely to develop disturbed eating attitudes over a 5-year period. These findings point to the importance of helping adolescents to establish regular eating habits, to avoid unhealthy dieting practices and to prevent sedentary behaviours that might lead to overweight and or obesity in early childhood.
PubMed ID
20443204 View in PubMed
Less detail

7-year stability of blood pressure in the Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197147
Source
Prev Med. 2000 Oct;31(4):403-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
P T Katzmarzyk
T. Rankinen
L. Pérusse
R M Malina
C. Bouchard
Author Affiliation
Department of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, North York, Ontario, Canada M3J IP3. katzmarz@yorku.ca
Source
Prev Med. 2000 Oct;31(4):403-9
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aging - physiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to examine the 7-year stability of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures in the Canadian population.
The sample included 1,503 participants 7-69 years of age from the 1981 Canada Fitness Survey who were remeasured in Campbell's Survey of 1988. Both SBP and DBP were adjusted for the effects of body mass index (BMI) using regression procedures.
Interage correlations from baseline to follow-up ranged from -0.17 to 0.61 for SBP and from -0.22 to 0. 51 for DBP. With few exceptions, correlations were positive and significant, and were highest and most consistent in adulthood. Further, between 27 and 39% of participants in the upper or lower quintiles in 1981 remained there in 1988. There were few differences in adiposity between those who remained in the upper or lower quintiles and those who did not. One exception was that males who remained in the upper quintile of SBP had greater values for BMI, sum of skinfolds, and waist circumference at baseline. Among adults, the best predictor of future blood pressure was baseline blood pressure, which accounted for between 12 and 34% of the variance in follow-up blood pressure, followed by age, follow-up BMI, and, in females, baseline physical activity levels.
Blood pressure demonstrated low to moderate stability over 7 years in Canada, and baseline level of adiposity was related to the stability of SBP in males.
PubMed ID
11006066 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10-Year Follow-Up of Adiposity and Dementia in Swedish Adults Aged 70 Years and Older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300956
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 63(4):1325-1335
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Ilse A C Arnoldussen
Valter Sundh
Kristoffer Bäckman
Silke Kern
Svante Östling
Kaj Blennow
Henrik Zetterberg
Ingmar Skoog
Amanda J Kiliaan
Deborah R Gustafson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 63(4):1325-1335
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adiposity
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Dementia - blood - epidemiology - pathology
Fasting
Female
Humans
Independent living
Leptin - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Adiposity measured in mid- or late-life and estimated using anthropometric measures such as body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), or metabolic markers such as blood leptin and adiponectin levels, is associated with late-onset dementia risk. However, during later life, this association may reverse and aging- and dementia-related processes may differentially affect adiposity measures.
We explored associations of concurrent BMI, WHR, and blood leptin and high molecular weight adiponectin levels with dementia occurrence.
924 Swedish community-dwelling elderly without dementia, aged 70 years and older, systematically-sampled by birth day and birth year population-based in the Gothenburg city region of Sweden. The Gothenburg Birth Cohort Studies are designed for evaluating risk and protective factors for dementia. All dementias diagnosed after age 70 for 10 years were identified. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to predict dementia occurrence between 2000-2005, 2005-2010, and 2000-2010 after excluding prevalent baseline (year 2000) dementias. Baseline levels of BMI, WHR, leptin, and adiponectin were used.
Within 5 years of baseline, low BMI (
PubMed ID
29758945 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10-year follow-up of snoring in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10800
Source
Chest. 1998 Oct;114(4):1048-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
E. Lindberg
A. Taube
C. Janson
T. Gislason
K. Svärdsudd
G. Boman
Author Affiliation
Department of Lung Medicine and Asthma Research Centre, Uppsala University, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Sweden.
Source
Chest. 1998 Oct;114(4):1048-55
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Snoring - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Gain
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Little is known about the natural development of snoring, and this survey was conducted to study the development of snoring in men over a 10-year period. DESIGN: Population-based prospective survey. SETTING: The Municipality of Uppsala, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS AND MEASUREMENTS: In 1984, 3,201 randomly selected men aged 30 to 69 years answered a questionnaire on snoring and sleep disturbances. Of the 2,975 survivors in 1994, 2,668 (89.7%) answered a new questionnaire with identical questions to those used at baseline. Questions about smoking habits, alcohol, and physical activity were also added. RESULTS: Habitual snoring was reported by 393 men (15.0%) in 1984 and by 529 (20.4%) 10 years later. In both 1984 and 1994, the prevalence of snoring increased until age 50 to 60 years and then decreased. Risk factors for being a habitual snorer at the follow-up were investigated using multiple logistic regression with adjustments for previous snoring status, age, body mass index (BMI), weight gain, smoking habits, and physical activity. In men aged 30 to 49 years at baseline, the predictors of habitual snoring at the follow-up, in addition to previous snoring status, were as follows: persistent smoking (adjusted odds ratio, 95% confidence interval) (1.4, 1.1 to 1.9), BMI 1984 (1.1, 1.02 to 1.1/kg/m2) and weight gain (1.1, 1.03 to 1.2/kg/m2). Among men aged 50 to 69 years, after adjustments for previous snoring status and age, weight gain was the only significant risk factor for developing habitual snoring (1.2, 1.05 to 1.4/kg/m2). CONCLUSIONS: In men, the prevalence of snoring increases up to the age of 50 to 60 years and is then followed by a decrease. Weight gain is a risk factor for snoring in all age groups, while smoking is mainly associated with snoring in men
PubMed ID
9792576 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 12 year prospective study of circulatory disease among Danish shift workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82071
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;63(7):451-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Tüchsen F.
Hannerz H.
Burr H.
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. ft@ami.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;63(7):451-5
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies of the risk of heart disease after shift work reached different estimates and review authors disagree about the validity of some of the studies. A cross sectional study showed that shift workers had a higher prevalence of nearly every unfavourable work environment factor investigated. Conflicts at work and low decision latitude were more frequent among shift workers, and all-day walking or standing work and part-time jobs were more often found among female shift workers. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the risk of circulatory disease in a prospective follow up of a representative sample of gainfully employed Danes, considering known or suspected confounding factors. METHODS: A cohort of 5517 people who were gainfully employed in 1990 were followed up for all hospital treatments due to circulatory diseases (390-458, ICD-8; I00-I99, ICD-10) from 1991 to 2002 inclusive. A log linear Poisson regression model was applied to control confounding factors and calculate the relative risk for 927 men and women working nights, evenings, or other non-day shifts compared to 4579 day workers. RESULTS: Non-day workers compared to day workers had a relative risk (RR) for all circulatory diseases of 1.31 (95% CI 1.06-1.63). Without control for BMI and smoking, the RR estimate was 1.33 (95% CI 1.07-1.65). For a subgroup of workers with at least three years' seniority, the RR was 1.40 (95% CI 1.09-1.81). The population based aetiological fraction of shift work was estimated to 5%. CONCLUSION: This study adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that shift work carries an excess risk of circulatory diseases.
PubMed ID
16735480 View in PubMed
Less detail

17-beta-estradiol in relation to age at menarche and adult obesity in premenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86676
Source
Hum Reprod. 2008 Apr;23(4):919-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Emaus A.
Espetvedt S.
Veierød M B
Ballard-Barbash R.
Furberg A-S
Ellison P T
Jasienska G.
Hjartåker A.
Thune I.
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Ullevål University Hospital, 0407 Oslo, Norway. aina.emaus@medisin.uio.no
Source
Hum Reprod. 2008 Apr;23(4):919-27
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Breast Neoplasms
Estradiol - analysis - physiology
Female
Humans
Menarche - physiology
Menstrual Cycle - physiology
Norway
Obesity - physiopathology
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Saliva - chemistry
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We hypothesize that premenopausal endogenous estradiol may be associated with age at menarche and adult overweight and obesity, potentially contributing to breast cancer risk. METHODS: We assessed age at menarche by questionnaire among 204 healthy Norwegian women, aged 25-35 years. Measures of body composition included body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)), waist circumference (WC, cm), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and fat percentage dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, (DEXA). Daily salivary 17-beta-estradiol (E(2)) concentrations were collected throughout one entire menstrual cycle and assessed by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Linear regression analyses and linear mixed models for repeated measures were used and potential confounding factors and effect modifiers were tested. RESULTS: Among women with an early age at menarche (
PubMed ID
18227106 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 21-year follow-up of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study: risk factor levels, secular trends and east-west difference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180902
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Apr;255(4):457-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
M. Juonala
J S A Viikari
N. Hutri-Kähönen
M. Pietikäinen
E. Jokinen
L. Taittonen
J. Marniemi
T. Rönnemaa
O T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
The Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Apr;255(4):457-68
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Patient Dropouts
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study is an on-going multicentre study of atherosclerosis precursors in Finnish children and young adults. We have collected risk factor data in the 21-year follow-up performed in 2001. The aims of this analysis were to examine the levels, secular trends and east-west difference in risk factors amongst young adults.
Population based follow-up study.
A total of 2283 participants aged 24-39 years in 2001 (63.5% of the original cohort).
Levels of serum lipids, apolipoproteins, blood pressure and smoking.
The mean serum total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in 24-39-year-old adults were 5.16, 3.27, 1.29 and 1.34 mmol L(-1), respectively. Total cholesterol (5.21 vs. 5.12 mmol L(-1), P = 0.046), HDL cholesterol (1.31 vs. 1.28 mmol L(-1), P = 0.027), systolic blood pressure (118 vs. 115 mmHg, P
PubMed ID
15049880 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 24-week dietary and physical activity lifestyle intervention reduces hepatic insulin resistance in the obese with chronic hepatitis C.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117638
Source
Liver Int. 2013 Mar;33(3):410-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Venessa Pattullo
Andres Duarte-Rojo
Wael Soliman
Florencia Vargas-Vorackova
Sanjeev Sockalingam
Ivan G Fantus
Johane Allard
Jenny Heathcote
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Liver Int. 2013 Mar;33(3):410-9
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Basal Metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Hepatitis C, Chronic - complications - pathology
Humans
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity - complications - diet therapy - therapy
Ontario
Prospective Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Obesity- and virus-mediated insulin resistance (IR) are associated with adverse hepatic and metabolic outcomes in chronic hepatitis C (CHC). This study evaluates the tolerability and effects of a dietary and physical activity (PA) intervention in obese patients with insulin-resistant CHC.
Obese patients (body mass index, BMI =30 kg/m(2) ) with CHC were recruited prospectively. Non-diabetic patients with IR (homeostasis model assessment of IR, HOMA-IR >2.0) proceeded to a 24-week lifestyle intervention comprising pedometer monitored increase in PA (=10 000 steps/day) and an individualised dietary plan.
Ten non-cirrhotic and six cirrhotic patients [age 52 ± 8.5 years, BMI 35.9 (31.46-38.21)kg/m(2) ] were recruited, of whom all 16 (100%) completed the 24-week protocol. Increase in PA from 6853 (2440-9533) to 10 697 (7959-13566) steps/day (P = 0.001) and reduction in caloric intake from 2263 (1805.4-2697.0) to 1281 (1099.5-1856.3) kcal/day (equivalent to reduction of median 33% (25.3-49.8%), P
PubMed ID
23278982 View in PubMed
Less detail

4947 records – page 1 of 495.