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BMI, a performance parameter for speed improvement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257373
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(2):e90183
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Adrien Sedeaud
Andy Marc
Adrien Marck
Frédéric Dor
Julien Schipman
Maya Dorsey
Amal Haida
Geoffroy Berthelot
Jean-François Toussaint
Author Affiliation
IRMES (Institut de Recherche bioMédicale et d'Epidémiologie du Sport), INSEP, Paris, France ; Université Paris-Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France.
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(2):e90183
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Performance
Body mass index
Humans
Male
Running
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between anthropometric characteristics and performance in all track and field running events and assess Body Mass Index (BMI) as a relevant performance indicator. Data of mass, height, BMI and speed were collected for the top 100 international men athletes in track events from 100 m to marathon for the 1996-2011 seasons, and analyzed by decile of performance. Speed is significantly associated with mass (r = 0.71) and BMI (r = 0.71) in world-class runners and moderately with height (r = 0.39). Athletes, on average were continuously lighter and smaller with distance increments. In track and field, speed continuously increases with BMI. In each event, performances are organized through physique gradients. « Lighter and smaller is better » in endurance events but « heavier and taller is better » for sprints. When performance increases, BMI variability progressively tightens, but it is always centered around a distance-specific optimum. Running speed is organized through biometric gradients, which both drives and are driven by performance optimization. The highest performance level is associated with narrower biometric intervals. Through BMI indicators, diversity is possible for sprints whereas for long distance events, there is a more restrictive aspect in terms of physique. BMI is a relevant indicator, which allows for a clear differentiation of athletes' capacities between each discipline and level of performance in the fields of human possibilities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24587266 View in PubMed
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[Occurrence of obesity: stagnation of the increase].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124931
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Apr 23;174(17):1141
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-23-2012
Author
Bjørn Richelsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Apr 23;174(17):1141
Date
Apr-23-2012
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Obesity - epidemiology
PubMed ID
22533928 View in PubMed
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Adequate nutrient intakes are associated with traditional food consumption in nunavut inuit children aged 3-5 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97085
Source
J Nutr. 2010 Jul;140(7):1311-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Louise Johnson-Down
Grace M Egeland
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment and School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Québec, H9X 3V9 Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 2010 Jul;140(7):1311-6
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Child, Preschool
Diet
Humans
Nunavut
Nutrition Assessment
Abstract
Dietary habits among Arctic preschoolers are unknown. A cross-sectional health survey of 388 Inuit, aged 3-5 y, was conducted in 16 communities in Canada's Nunavut Territory. Twenty-four-hour recall and FFQ with parents and primary caregivers quantified diet from market and traditional foods (TF). The Institute of Medicine's Dietary Reference Intakes estimated adequacy comparing intakes with Estimated Average Requirement or Adequate Intakes (AI). High-sugar and high-fat food and sugar beverage consumption and the extent to which dietary habits followed the Canadian Food Guide were evaluated. The children's mean age was 4.4 +/- 0.9 y and the mean BMI percentile was 90.2%. Consumption of nutrient-poor and energy-dense food and beverages contributed to 35% of energy. Most children met the requirements for many nutrients despite not eating the recommended servings from Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide First Nations, Inuit and Métis. Higher intake of TF resulted in higher intakes of cholesterol, vitamins A and D, iron, magnesium, and zinc. The percent above the AI for vitamin D was 43.1, 56.8, and 83.2% among no, low, and high TF consumers, respectively (chi2 test; P-trend
PubMed ID
20444949 View in PubMed
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Childhood social circumstances and body mass index in adult life: The Metropolit 1953 Danish male birth cohort

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101201
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):296-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Larsen, A-M
Lund, R
Kriegbaum, M
Avlund, K
Osler, M
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Institut of Public Health, 1014 Copenhagen K, Denmark
Center for Healthy Ageing, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup 2600 Denmark
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):296-302
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Childhood socioeconomic position
Cognitive function
Cohort study
Denmark
Abstract
AIMS: To examine whether father's social class was associated with body mass index (BMI) at age 20 and 50 years in a cohort of men born in 1953 and to explore the role of birth weight, cognitive function (IQ), and educational status in these relationships. METHODS: We used data from the Metropolit cohort which includes 11,532 Danish men born in 1953 with information on father's socioeconomic position (SEP) at participant's birth and assessments of height, weight, cognitive performance, and education at age 20. In 2004, 6292 of these men participated in a follow-up survey on health and behavior. Linear and logistic regression was used to investigate the association of father's social class with BMI among the 5117 men with complete information on all variables. RESULTS: Between age 20 and 50, mean BMI increased from 21.4 to 26.1 kg/m2, while the prevalence of overweight (BMI >=25 kg/m2) increased from 8.1 to 57.8%. Men of fathers who were skilled or unskilled workers had higher odds of being overweight (OR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.13-1.53) or often obese (OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.03-1.60) at age 50 years compared to those with fathers being self-employed, employee, or civil servants when adjusted for the other socially correlated indicators of impaired childhood development. In the linear regression analyses, mean BMI at both age 20 and 50 were around 0.3 kg/m2 higher in men with fathers from working class compared to those self-employed, employee, or civil servants. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports that among men, father's SEP influences the development of obesity later in adult life.
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Birthweight and body mass index in young adulthood: the Swedish young male twins study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191266
Source
Twin Res. 2001 Oct;4(5):400-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
M. Johansson
F. Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. malin.johansson@imm.ki.se
Source
Twin Res. 2001 Oct;4(5):400-5
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Birth weight
Body mass index
Humans
Male
Sweden
Abstract
Many studies have found an inverse association between fetal growth and cardiovascular disease related to the metabolic syndrome in adulthood. Nevertheless, the relative importance of genetics and the intrauterine environment remain unclear. The objective of the study was to test the fetal origins hypothesis and the fetal insulin resistance hypothesis by studying the impact of fetal growth on Body Mass Index (BMI) in young adulthood. In a nationwide cohort study, the Swedish Medical Birth Register for the years 1973-1979 was linked with the Military Service Conscription Register for 1990-1999. In 1998 a questionnaire was mailed to all male twins, included in the two registers, who were alive and still resident in Sweden. The study covers the 923 male twin pairs for which full data were available. Mixed linear models were used to estimate within-pair and between-pair differences in birthweight and their relations to BMI. A weak positive association was found among the monozygotic twins for the withinpair difference in birthweight and BMI. No significant association was found among the monozygotic for the between-pair difference in birthweight and BMI. No significant associations were found for dizygotic twins. These findings do not seem to support either the fetal programming hypothesis or the fetal insulin resistance hypothesis.
PubMed ID
11869495 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 2001 May 29;164(11):1563; author reply 1564-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-29-2001
Author
M. Finkelstein
Source
CMAJ. 2001 May 29;164(11):1563; author reply 1564-5
Date
May-29-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Humans
Obesity - epidemiology
Research Design
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Nov 28;163(11):1429-3311192647
Comment On: CMAJ. 2000 Nov 28;163(11):1429-3311192647
PubMed ID
11402792 View in PubMed
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Promoting physical activity in a Cree community

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102150
Source
Pages 197-203 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
control communities (frequency of physical activity and Body Mass Index). 3. To extend the program to the other Cree commu- nities of the region. Description of the Intervention The pilot program was set up in one of the smallest Cree communities chosen on the basis of interest shown by its
  1 document  
Author
Lavallée, C
Robinson, E
Valverde, C
Lavallee, C
Author Affiliation
Montreal General Hospital, Canada
Source
Pages 197-203 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Body mass index
Cree
Exercise
James Bay
Physical activity
Weight control
Abstract
Responding to a concern of the Cree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay, a pilot project was initiated in order to plan, implement, and evaluate a community intervention for the promotion of physical activity. After a needs assessment, a campaign was carried out in one Cree village of 400 persons. Sport and fitness activities as well as workshops were organized. The process and outcomes of the FITFUN intervention were then evaluated using a quasi-experimental design. The results showed an increase in the frequency of physical activity in all communities. People who were at a healthy weight in the experimental community before the intervention did not gain weight, whereas other groups in all communities did. Recommendations are formulated and the extension of the program to the whole region is described.
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Exercise during pregnancy, maternal prepregnancy body mass index, and birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98290
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Feb;115(2 Pt 1):331-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Caroline Fleten
Hein Stigum
Per Magnus
Wenche Nystad
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo, Norway. anne.caroline.fleten@fhi.no
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Feb;115(2 Pt 1):331-7
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Body mass index
Exercise
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the direct associations between exercise during pregnancy and offspring birth weight and between maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and birth weight. Furthermore, we estimated the indirect association between maternal BMI and birth weight, explained by exercise during pregnancy. METHODS: This study included pregnant women and their offspring recruited from 1999 to 2006 in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Linear regression analyses were based on exposure data from two self-administered questionnaires during pregnancy and birth weight data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. RESULTS: The study included 43,705 pregnancies. The median exercise frequency during the first 17 weeks of gestation was six times per month and four times per month thereafter until week 30. Mean maternal prepregnancy BMI was 24 kg/m, and mean birth weight of the offspring was 3,677 g. The adjusted direct association between exercise and birth weight was a 2.9-g decrease in birth weight per unit increase in exercise (one time per month). In contrast, the adjusted direct association between BMI and birth weight was a 20.3-g increase in birth weight for a one-unit increase in BMI (1 kg/m), and the indirect association explained by exercise was only a 0.3-g increase in birth weight. CONCLUSION: Exercise during pregnancy has a minor impact on birth weight, whereas maternal prepregnancy BMI has a larger influence. Thus, we suggest that health care professionals should focus on normalizing the BMI of women in fertile ages. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II.
PubMed ID
20093907 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric measurements in Canadian children: a scoping review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106379
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Sep-Oct;104(5):e369-74
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ian T Patton
Amy C McPherson
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto. ian.patton@utoronto.ca.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Sep-Oct;104(5):e369-74
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry - methods
Body mass index
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Abstract
The objective of the current study was to identify what forms of anthropometric measurement are currently being utilized with Canadian children and youth and what are the gaps in the literature on this topic.
The current study utilized a scoping review methodology in order to achieve the study objectives. Online databases Medline and PubMed and CINAHL were used to search articles from the last decade (2002-2012) that addressed Canadian children aged 2-18 years.
50 studies were included in this review. A variety of anthropometric measurements were identified, including body mass index, waist circumference, hip-to-waist ratio, among others. Six of the included studies (12%) utilized nationally representative data from large-scale studies. BMI was the most reported form of measurement with 88% of studies collecting it. Waist circumference was a distant second with 20% of studies reporting it. Several gaps in the literature exist with regards to First Nations (FN) research; many of the measurement methods were not used. Additionally, FN accounted for only 2.5% of the study's sample. The majority of studies took place in Quebec (29%) and Ontario (27%).
Body mass index is the most reported method of anthropometric measurement used for children. Efforts should be taken by health care practitioners and researchers to collect other forms of measurement in order to assist in understanding the validity of other measures and their value when used with children. Furthermore, attention needs to be focused on utilizing and studying various forms of anthropometric measurement across all Canadian regions and populations.
PubMed ID
24183177 View in PubMed
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A description of physical activity and body mass index in three Inuvialuit communities: Results from Healthy Foods North

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258220
Source
Page 154 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
A DESCRIPTION OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND BODY MASS INDEX IN THREE INUVIALUIT COMMUNITIES, RESULTS FROM HEAL THY FOODS NORTH 5. Reaburn, 5. Biggs, E. Erber, L. Beck, E. DeRoose, J. Gittelsohn, 5. Sharma Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON Objective: To describe
  1 document  
Author
Pedersen M
Flrischer I
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care in Nuuk
Source
Page 154 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adults
Arctic
Body mass index
Canada
Healthy Foods North
Inuvialuit
Physical activity
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral Presentations. Chapter 3. Chronic Diseases.
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4882 records – page 1 of 489.