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Ideals versus reality: Are weight ideals associated with weight change in the population?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278352
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2016 Apr;24(4):947-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ulla Kärkkäinen
Linda Mustelin
Anu Raevuori
Jaakko Kaprio
Anna Keski-Rahkonen
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2016 Apr;24(4):947-53
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Body Weights and Measures - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Ideal Body Weight
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prospective Studies
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
To quantify weight ideals of young adults and to examine whether the discrepancy between actual and ideal weight is associated with 10-year body mass index (BMI) change in the population.
This study comprised 4,964 adults from the prospective population-based FinnTwin16 study. They reported their actual and ideal body weight at age 24 (range 22-27) and 10 years later (attrition 24.6%). The correlates of discrepancy between actual and ideal body weight and the impact on subsequent BMI change were examined.
The discrepancy between actual and ideal weight at 24 years was on average 3.9 kg (1.4 kg/m(2) ) among women and 1.2 kg (0.4 kg/m(2) ) among men. On average, participants gained weight during follow-up irrespective of baseline ideal weight: women ¯x?=?+4.8 kg (1.7 kg/m(2) , 95% CI 1.6-1.9 kg/m(2) ), men ¯x?=?+6.3 kg (2.0 kg/m(2) , 95% CI 1.8-2.1 kg/m(2) ). Weight ideals at 24 years were not correlated with 10-year weight change. At 34 years, just 13.2% of women and 18.9% of men were at or below the weight they had specified as their ideal weight at 24 years. Women and men adjusted their ideal weight upward over time.
Irrespective of ideal weight at baseline, weight gain was nearly universal. Weight ideals were shifted upward over time.
PubMed ID
26841234 View in PubMed
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Physical self-esteem, a five year follow-up study on Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97625
Source
Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2009 Oct-Dec;21(4):497-507
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anders Raustorp
Trevor Archer
Kjell Svensson
Thommy Perlinger
Marie Alricsson
Author Affiliation
University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences, Division of Physical Education, SE 391 82 Kalmar, Sweden. anders.raustorp@hik.se
Source
Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2009 Oct-Dec;21(4):497-507
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Image
Body mass index
Body Weights and Measures - psychology
Child
Exercise - psychology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Sports
Sweden
Abstract
This study describes the levels and inter-correlations of physical self-esteem, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), and body fat and, in addition, distinctive of individuals with high vs. low physical self-worth in a longitudinal design during adolescence. METHODS: At mean ages 12.7, 15.7, and 17.7 years, physical activity (steps/day) was measured for four consecutive schooldays of 77 (41 girls) Swedish adolescents. Perceived physical self-esteem, height, weight, and at ages 15.7 and 17.7 years, body fat percent was also measured. RESULTS: Boys' physical self-perception scores were higher than girls' and an overall stability during adolescents was seen. High and low physical self-worth had a significant impact regarding BMI at ages 12.7 and 17.7 years and regarding body fat at age 17.7 years in both boys and girls. CONCLUSIONS: Regression analysis indicated that BMI and body fat counter-predicted self-worth in girls age-dependently. Efforts to build adapted physical activity programs for overweight and obese are emphasized.
PubMed ID
20306762 View in PubMed
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