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Activity pattern and energy expenditure due to physical activity before and during pregnancy in healthy Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63107
Source
Br J Nutr. 2006 Feb;95(2):296-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Marie Lof
Elisabet Forsum
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutrition, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoping, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2006 Feb;95(2):296-302
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Exertion - physiology
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Pregnancy - physiology
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Running - physiology
Sleep - physiology
Sweden
Walking - physiology
Abstract
Human pregnancy is associated with increased requirements for dietary energy and this increase may be partly offset by reductions in physical activity during gestation. Studies in well-nourished women have shown that the physical activity level (PAL), obtained as the total energy expenditure (TEE) divided by the BMR, decreases in late pregnancy. However, it is not known if this decrease is really caused by reductions in physical activity or if it is the result of decreases in energy expenditure/BMR (the so-called metabolic equivalent, MET) for many activities in late pregnancy. In the present study activity pattern, TEE and BMR were assessed in twenty-three healthy Swedish women before pregnancy as well as in gestational weeks 14 and 32. Activity pattern was assessed using a questionnaire and heart rate recording. TEE was assessed using the doubly labelled water method and BMR was measured by means of indirect calorimetry. When compared to the pre-pregnant value, there was little change in the PAL in gestational week 14 but it was significantly reduced in gestational week 32. Results obtained by means of the questionnaire and by heart rate recording showed that the activity pattern was largely unaffected by pregnancy. The findings support the following conclusion: in a population of well-nourished women where the activity pattern is maintained during pregnancy, the increase in BMR represents approximately the main part of the pregnancy-induced increase in TEE, at least until gestational week 32.
PubMed ID
16469145 View in PubMed
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Additive effects of the mutations in the beta3-adrenergic receptor and uncoupling protein-1 genes on weight loss and weight maintenance in Finnish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203645
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1998 Dec;83(12):4246-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
M. Fogelholm
R. Valve
K. Kukkonen-Harjula
A. Nenonen
V. Hakkarainen
M. Laakso
M. Uusitupa
Author Affiliation
The UKK Institute for Health Promotion and Research, Tampere, Finland. mikael.fogelholm@helsinki.fi
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1998 Dec;83(12):4246-50
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amino Acid Sequence
Base Sequence
Body Weight - physiology
Carrier Proteins - genetics
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Ion Channels
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Mitochondrial Proteins
Mutation - genetics - physiology
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta - genetics
Weight Loss - physiology
Abstract
This study examined whether the Trp64Arg mutation in the beta3-adrenergic receptor (beta3AR) and the A-->G mutation in the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) genes have associations with weight loss and subsequent weight maintenance. Seventy-seven obese (body mass index range, 29-46 kg/m2), clinically healthy, premenopausal women were studied. A 12-wk weight reduction by very low calorie diet (VLCD) was followed by a 40-wk weight maintenance phase. The subjects were divided into four groups according to their beta3AR and UCP-1 genotype: no mutation (control; n=37), only Trp64Arg mutation in the beta3AR gene (n=12), only A-->G mutation in the UCP-1 gene (n=23), and both mutations (n=5). Subjects with both mutations had a lower weight reduction during VLCD than the controls [-10.5+/-0.6 (+/-SEM) vs. -14.0+/-0.5 kg; P=0.051, by ANOVA]. During the maintenance phase, weight in subjects with both mutations increased by 5.8+/-1.5 kg, but remained unchanged in the controls (-0.5+/-0.8 kg; P=0.041). The changes in weight in subjects with only one of the mutation were close to the results in the controls. Resting energy expenditure, adjusted for fat mass, fat-free mass, and maximal aerobic power, did not change differently between the groups throughout the study. The results suggest that a combination of the Trp64Arg mutation in the beta3AR and the A-->G mutation in the UCP-1 genes may be associated with faster weight gain after a VLCD.
PubMed ID
9851758 View in PubMed
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Adiponectin levels measured in dried blood spot samples from neonates born small and appropriate for gestational age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162263
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2007 Aug;157(2):189-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
A. Klamer
K. Skogstrand
D M Hougaard
B. Nørgaard-Petersen
A. Juul
G. Greisen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neonatology (section 5021), National University Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. anja.klamer@rh.dk
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2007 Aug;157(2):189-94
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Cross Reactions - physiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - blood
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - blood
Male
Maternal Age
Abstract
Adiponectin levels measured in neonatal dried blood spot samples (DBSS) might be affected by both prematurity and being born small for gestational age (SGA). The aim of the study was to measure adiponectin levels in routinely collected neonatal DBSS taken on day 5 (range 3-12) postnatal from infants.
A retrospective case-control study.
One hundred and twenty-two infants: 62 very premature (34 SGA) and 60 mature infants (27 SGA). Adiponectin concentrations were determined in stored neonatal DBSS using a sandwich immunoassay based on flow metric Luminex xMap technology.
Adiponectin was measurable in all samples, and repeated measurements correlated significantly (r = 0.94). Adiponectin concentrations were negatively associated with both SGA (B = -0.283, P = 0.04) and prematurity (B = -2.194, P
PubMed ID
17656597 View in PubMed
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Adult-onset calorie restriction delays the accumulation of mitochondrial enzyme abnormalities in aging rat kidney tubular epithelial cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78534
Source
Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2007 Jun;292(6):F1751-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
McKiernan Susan H
Tuen Victoria C
Baldwin Katherine
Wanagat Jonathan
Djamali Arjang
Aiken Judd M
Author Affiliation
Department of Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA. mckiernan@svm.vetmed.wisc.edu
Source
Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2007 Jun;292(6):F1751-60
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Body Weight - physiology
Caloric Restriction
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Diet
Electron Transport Complex IV - metabolism
Epithelial Cells - enzymology
Gene Deletion
Kidney Tubules - cytology - enzymology
Lasers
Male
Mitochondria - enzymology
Organ Size - physiology
Rats
Rats, Inbred F344
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Succinate Dehydrogenase - metabolism
Abstract
Adult-onset calorie restriction (A-CR) is an experimental model of life extension and healthy aging less explored, compared with calorie restriction begun at early ages, but one more realistic for human application. We examined the effect of A-CR on the aging rat kidney with respect to common structural age-dependent changes and the accumulation of mitochondrial enzyme abnormalities in tubular epithelial cells. A 40% calorie restriction was initiated in middle-aged rats, before the onset of significant age-related changes in the Fischer x Brown Norway rat kidney. This dietary intervention effectively reduced glomerulosclerosis and tubular atrophy within 6 mo and changed the rate of interstitial fibrosis formation within 1 yr and vascular wall thickening and the expression cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-deficient tubular epithelial cells in 18 mo compared with age-matched ad libitum-fed rats. Our histological approach (histochemical staining for mitochondrial enzyme activity and laser capture microdissection) coupled with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) PCR analyses demonstrated that COX-deficient renal tubular epithelial cells accumulated mtDNA deletion mutations and that these cells contained unique, clonally expanded mtDNA deletion mutations. Renal tubular epithelial cells with mitochondrial abnormalities presented cellular characteristics indicative of physiological dysfunction.
PubMed ID
17344189 View in PubMed
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Advanced pubertal growth spurt in subjects born preterm: the Helsinki study of very low birth weight adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138699
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Feb;96(2):525-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Karoliina Wehkalampi
Petteri Hovi
Leo Dunkel
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Sture Andersson
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 30, Mannerheimintie 164, 00271 Helsinki, Finland. karoliina.wehkalampi@helsinki.fi
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Feb;96(2):525-33
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Growth - physiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - physiology
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight - physiology
Male
Menarche - physiology
Parents
Pregnancy
Puberty - physiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Voice - physiology
Abstract
Among people born at term, low birth weight is associated with early puberty. Early maturation may be on the pathway linking low birth weight with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Subjects born preterm with very low birth weight (VLBW;
PubMed ID
21147886 View in PubMed
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Aerobic fitness in young Norwegian men: a comparison between 1980 and 2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49581
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2005 Oct;15(5):298-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
S M Dyrstad
A. Aandstad
J. Hallén
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian University of Sport and Physical Education, Oslo, Norway. sindre.drystad@nih.no
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2005 Oct;15(5):298-303
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Exercise Test
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Norway
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - physiopathology
Vocational Education
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in 18-19-year-old Norwegian men from 1980 to 1985 and 2002. In addition, we investigated the relationship between VO2max and education and smoking habits in the sample from 2002. From 1980 to 1985, VO2max was predicted using the Astrand-Rhyming bicycle test for 183 610 eighteen-year-old Norwegian men (91% of the male Norwegian population in this age group). In 2002, the same test was performed on a representative sample of the same age population (N=1028). VO2max (mL x kg(-1)x min(-1)), decreased by 8%, body weight increased by 7% and body mass index (BMI) increased by 6% over the approximately 20-year period (P
PubMed ID
16181253 View in PubMed
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Affective responses to changes in day length in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45723
Source
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2005 Jun;30(5):438-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Brian J Prendergast
Randy J Nelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. prendergast@uchicago.edu
Source
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2005 Jun;30(5):438-52
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anxiety - psychology
Attention - physiology
Behavior, Animal - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Conflict (Psychology)
Cricetinae
Depression - psychology
Emotions - physiology
Exploratory Behavior - physiology
Female
Light
Motor Activity - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Phodopus
Photoperiod
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Smell - physiology
Startle Reaction - physiology
Swimming - psychology
Abstract
The goal of these experiments was to test the hypothesis that day length influences anxious- and depressive-like behaviors in reproductively photoperiodic rodents. Male and female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) were exposed to long (16 h light/day; LD) or short (8 h light/day; SD) photoperiods beginning at the time of weaning (day 18). Two weeks later hamsters were subjected to a series of behavioral tests to quantify anxiety-and depressive-like behaviors. In an elevated plus maze, SD males exhibited longer latencies to enter an open arm, entered fewer open arms, and spent less time exploring open arms relative to LD hamsters. SD males were likewise slower to enter either of the distal arms of a completely enclosed T-maze, and in a hunger-motivated exploratory paradigm SD males were slower to enter an open arena for food as compared to LD males. In a forced-swimming model of behavioral despair, SD males exhibited immobility sooner, more often, and for a greater total amount of time relative to LD males. Total activity levels, aversiveness to light, olfactory function, and limb strength were unaffected by SD, suggesting that the behavioral changes consequent to SD are not attributable to sensory or motor deficits, but rather may arise from changes in general affective state. The anxiogenic and depressive effects of SD were largely absent in female hamsters. Together the results indicate that adaptation to short photoperiods is associated with increased expression of anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors relative to those observed under LD photoperiod conditions.
PubMed ID
15721056 View in PubMed
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Age, bodyweight, smoking habits and the risk of severe osteoarthritis in the hip and knee in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13723
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(6):537-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Bengt Järvholm
Stefan Lewold
Henrik Malchau
Eva Vingård
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Seweden. bengt.jarholm@envmed.umu.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(6):537-42
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - utilization
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - utilization
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Facility Design and Construction - manpower
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Industry - classification
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Osteoarthritis, Knee - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to estimate the risk of severe osteoarthritis, with the need for arthroplasty, in the knee and/or hip according to body mass index (BMI) both within a normal range and in persons with high BMI. Furthermore, we wanted to study the significance of smoking. METHODS: This study identifies male construction workers participating in a national health control program (n = 320,192). The incidence rate for joint replacement was found by matching with the Swedish hospital discharge register between 1987 and 1998. BMI and smoking habit was registered at the time of the health examination. RESULTS: In total 1495 cases of osteoarthritis of the hip and 502 cases of osteoarthritis of the knee were identified and included in this analysis. The incidence rate was found to increase linearly to the BMI even within low and 'normal' BMI. The relative risk for osteoarthritis of the hip was more than two times higher in persons with a BMI of 20-24 than in men with a BMI 17-19. There was almost a doubling of the risk of severe knee osteoarthritis with an increase in BMI of 5 kg/m2. Smoker had a lower risk of osteoarthritis than non-smokers and ex-smokers. CONCLUSIONS: BMI is an important predictor of osteoarthritis even within normal BMI. A decreased risk of osteoarthritis of the hip was found in smokers, but the effect was weak compared to that of BMI or age. Contrary to studies of radiographic osteoarthritis our study indicates higher risk of hip than of knee osteoarthritis.
PubMed ID
16121763 View in PubMed
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Age-related association between body mass index and blood pressure: the Humboldt Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213939
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1995 Nov;19(11):825-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
Y. Chen
D C Rennie
B A Reeder
Author Affiliation
Centre for Agricultural Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1995 Nov;19(11):825-31
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aging - physiology
Animals
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - physiopathology
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate how age modifies the relation between body mass and blood pressure.
Community based cross-sectional study.
2865 residents aged 6 to 74 years (85.6% of the target population) in the town of Humboldt, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Body mass index [weight (kg)/height (meters)2], and diastolic and systolic blood pressures.
Among the subjects, 99.6% were of Caucasian origin. With both sexes, there was a stronger relation between body mass index and diastolic blood pressure in younger age groups than older age groups. In males, the increase in mean blood pressure for a 1-unit increase in body mass index (kg/m2) was 0.72, 0.72, 0.41 and 0.47 mm Hg in the 6-14, 15-34, 35-54 and 55-74 year age groups respectively. In females, the correspondent increase was 0.95, 0.57, 0.46 and 0.43 mm Hg. In females, age also modified the relation between body mass index and the prevalence of high blood pressure. The odds ratios for high blood pressure for a 1-unit increase in body mass index in females was 1.33, 1.21, 1.12 and 1.10 in the 6-14, 15-34, 35-54 and 55-74 year age groups.
Age significantly modifies the relations of body mass index with mean diastolic blood pressure in both sexes, and with the prevalence of high blood pressure in females. The relations are stronger in children and young adults than in older persons.
PubMed ID
8589786 View in PubMed
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[Alimentary and oxygen deprivation as the modulator of the bone tissue physiological remodelling rate in young rats]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86619
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2008;54(1):85-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Litovka I H
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2008;54(1):85-93
Date
2008
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood - metabolism
Animals
Anoxia - metabolism - physiopathology
Body Weight - physiology
Bone Remodeling - physiology
Bone and Bones - metabolism
Caloric Restriction
Electrophoresis, Agar Gel
Gene Expression - physiology
Glycosaminoglycans - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - genetics
Liver - metabolism
Male
Melatonin - blood
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Abstract
Influencing of 28-days alimentary deprivation and intermittent hypoxia to 3 months Wistar male rats (n = 30) bone tissue physiological remodelling is studied. We investigated 3 groups of animals, I group was control, II--food limitation mode (-40% in relation to the normal ration) and III--animals, which breathed hypoxic gas mixture with 13% O2 in nitrogen (HGM) during 4 hours in the intermittent mode (10 min of deoxygenation and 10 min of reoxygenation). It is showed significant increasing of melatonin and glicozaminoglikans levels in the rats II and III gr. serum. Activity of alkaline phosphatase in the bone tissue of III gr. rats increased and in the bone tissue and serum of II gr. rats for 1.2 and 1.4 time accordingly. We registered significant increasing of serum acid phosphatase activity in animals, which have breathed hypoxic gas mixture. The IGF-I gene expression level did not change practically in both experimental groups. We conclude, that alimentary deprivation and intermittent hypoxia have positive effects on the physiological remodelling of bone tissue.
PubMed ID
18416190 View in PubMed
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264 records – page 1 of 27.