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A < 1.7 cM interval is responsible for Dmo1 obesity phenotypes in OLETF rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47295
Source
Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2004 Jan-Feb;31(1-2):110-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Takeshi K Watanabe
Shiro Okuno
Yuki Yamasaki
Toshihide Ono
Keiko Oga
Ayako Mizoguchi-Miyakita
Hideo Miyao
Mikio Suzuki
Hiroshi Momota
Yoshihiro Goto
Hiroichi Shinomiya
Haretsugu Hishigaki
Isamu Hayashi
Toshihiro Asai
Shigeyuki Wakitani
Toshihisa Takagi
Yusuke Nakamura
Akira Tanigami
Author Affiliation
Otsuka GEN Research Institute, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 463-10 Kagasuno, Kawauchi-cho, Tokushima 771-0192, Japan. tkw_watanabe@research.otsuka.co.jp
Source
Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2004 Jan-Feb;31(1-2):110-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Congenic
Body Weight - genetics
Crosses, Genetic
Diabetes Mellitus - genetics
Female
Hyperglycemia - genetics
Hyperlipidemia - blood - genetics
Male
Obesity
Phenotype
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred OLETF
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
1. Dmo1 (Diabetes Mellitus OLETF type I) is a major quantitative trait locus for dyslipidaemia, obesity and diabetes phenotypes of male Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. 2. Our congenic lines, produced by transferring Dmo1 chromosomal segments from the non-diabetic Brown Norway (BN) rat into the OLETF strain, have confirmed the strong, wide-range therapeutic effects of Dmo1 on dyslipidaemia, obesity and diabetes in the fourth (BC4) and fifth (BC5) generations of congenic animals. Analysis of a relatively small number of BC5 rats (n = 71) suggested that the critical Dmo1 interval lies within a
PubMed ID
14756694 View in PubMed
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1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273208
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Elizaveta Chabanova
Ehm Astrid Andersson
Johanne Dam Ohrt
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Henrik S Thomsen
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood
Fatty Liver - pathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Male
Muscles - pathology
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - blood - pathology
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Puberty
Sex Factors
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Abstract
This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children.
Fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years.
In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences of hepatic and muscular steatosis were 31% and 68%, respectively, whereas the prevalences in 40 lean children were 3% and 10%, respectively. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index z-score (BMI SDS), and pubertal development showed that the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 4.2 (95%CI: [1.8; 10.2], p = 0.0009) when hepatic steatosis was present. Comparing the simultaneous presence of hepatic and muscular steatosis with no presence of steatosis, the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 5.8 (95%CI: [2.0; 18.6], p = 0.002). No significant associations between muscle fat and dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, or blood pressure were observed. Liver and muscle fat, adjusted for age, sex, BMI SDS, and pubertal development, associated to BMI SDS and glycosylated hemoglobin, while only liver fat associated to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipid associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased cardiovascular disease risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26252778 View in PubMed
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[10-year trends in body weight in men and women in Novosibirsk (1985-1995)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174900
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(3):64-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
E S Kylbanova
S K Maliutina
N V Nasonova
Iu P Nikitin
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(3):64-7
Date
2005
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Siberia
Weight Gain
Abstract
To assess 10-year trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity in Novosibirsk population.
The data of three population surveys (a total of 9714 men and women aged 25-64 years) carried out according to WHO MONICA program.
Obesity prevalence among males in 1985-1989 tended to a small rise without changes during subsequent 5 years. In females the prevalence of obesity and overweight decreased in 1985-1994.
10-year trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity were insignificant in men and beneficial in women of Novosibirsk population while the frequency of increased body mass in women remains relatively high.
PubMed ID
15881103 View in PubMed
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25(OH)D levels in trained versus sedentary university students at 64° north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290407
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2017
Author
Scott P Jerome
Kendra D Sticka
Theresia M Schnurr
Sally J Mangum
Arleigh J Reynolds
Kriya L Dunlap
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Sedentary lifestyle
Students
Sunlight
Universities
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with compromised bone mineralisation, fatigue, suppressed immune function and unsatisfactory skeletal muscle recovery. We investigated the risk of 25(OH)D insufficiency or deficiency in endurance athletes compared to sedentary non-athletes living at 64° north.
University student-athletes (TS) and sedentary students (SS) volunteered to participate in this study. TS engaged in regular exercise while SS exercised no more than 20 minutes/week. Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) scores for participants were determined. Vitamin D intake was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's 24-hour food recall (ASA24). Fasting plasma 25(OH)D levels were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
TS reported higher activity levels than SS as assessed with MET-minutes/week and ranking of physical activity levels (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28452288 View in PubMed
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A 26 year physiological description of a National Hockey League team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156070
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2008 Aug;33(4):753-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
H A Quinney
Randy Dewart
Alex Game
Gary Snydmiller
Darren Warburton
Gordon Bell
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2008 Aug;33(4):753-60
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry - methods
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weights and Measures - methods - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Hand Strength - physiology
Hockey - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Endurance - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Skinfold thickness
Time
Young Adult
Abstract
The primary purpose of this investigation was to examine the physiological profile of a National Hockey League (NHL) team over a period of 26 years. All measurements were made at a similar time of year (pre-season) in 703 male (mean age +/- SD = 24 +/- 4 y) hockey players. The data were analyzed across years, between positions (defensemen, forwards, and goaltenders), and between what were deemed successful and non-successful years using a combination of points acquired during the season and play-off success. Most anthropometric (height, mass, and BMI) and physiological parameters (absolute and relative VO2 peak, relative peak 5 s power output, abdominal endurance, and combined grip strength) showed a gradual increase over the 26 year period. Defensemen were taller and heavier, had higher absolute VO2 peak, and had greater combined grip strength than forwards and goaltenders. Forwards were younger and had higher values for relative VO2 peak. Goaltenders were shorter, had less body mass, a higher sum of skinfolds, lower VO2 peak, and better flexibility. The overall pre-season fitness profile was not related to team success. In conclusion, this study revealed that the fitness profile for a professional NHL ice-hockey team exhibited increases in player size and anaerobic and aerobic fitness parameters over a 26 year period that differed by position. However, this evolution of physiological profile did not necessarily translate into team success in this particular NHL franchise.
PubMed ID
18641719 View in PubMed
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37 Years of Body Mass Index and Dementia: Effect Modification by the APOE Genotype: Observations from the Prospective Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275033
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(4):1119-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Kristoffer Bäckman
Erik Joas
Margda Waern
Svante Östling
Xinxin Guo
Kaj Blennow
Ingmar Skoog
Deborah R Gustafson
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(4):1119-27
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alleles
Apolipoprotein E4 - genetics
Body mass index
Body Weight - genetics
Dementia - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Overweight and obesity in mid- and late-life may increase risk for dementia, whereas a decline in body weight or body mass index (BMI) and underweight in years preceding a clinical dementia diagnosis are also associated with dementia. Little is known about the modifying effect of the APOE genotype, a major susceptibility gene for Alzheimer's disease (AD), on the BMI-dementia adult life course trajectory.
We evaluated the exposure, BMI, in relationship to the outcome, clinical dementia, over 37 years, considering the effect modification of the APOE ?4 allele.
The Prospective Population Study of Women (PPSW) in Sweden is a systematic sample of 1462 women born 1908, 1914, 1918, 1922, and 1930 and aged 38-60 years at baseline. Examinations occurred in 1968, 1974, 1980, 1992, 2000, and 2005; 559 women had information on dementia, BMI, and APOE ?4 allele status, in addition to covariates. Statistical analyses were conducted using mixed effects regression models.
Trajectories of BMI over 37 years differed by APOE ?4 allele status. While women gained BMI similarly from mid-life to age 70 years, women with at least one APOE ?4 allele experienced BMI decline more quickly after age 70 years compared to women without an APOE ?4 allele. However, upon stratifying the sample by dementia occurrence, it appeared that dementia drove the overall BMI-trajectory. There was a main effect of age, interactions of age by APOE ?4 allele status, and age by presence versus absence of dementia.
Women with similar average BMI at mid-life exhibited different BMI trajectories in relation to dementia occurrence. In addition, the pattern of BMI decline in late-life differed on the basis of APOE ?4 allele possession. Thus, these data suggest roles for both dementia- and APOE-associated changes in BMI during the adult life course.
PubMed ID
26402098 View in PubMed
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40-year follow-up of overweight children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38058
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-1989
Author
H O Mossberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Date
Aug-26-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Birth weight
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - genetics - mortality
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Reference Standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
504 overweight children admitted to hospital between 1921 and 1947 were followed up for 40 years by questionnaires at 10 year intervals. The mean weight for height (W/H) standard deviation score (SDS) reached a maximum in puberty (+3.5). The SDS fell to about +1 in adulthood. 47% patients were still obese (SDS greater than +1) in adulthood; 84.6% of these had SDS more than +2 in childhood. The degree of obesity in the family (parents and grandparents) and the degree of overweight in puberty were the most important factors for weight level in adulthood. Even when their food intake was in accordance with recommended levels, obese children had higher than normal weight as adults. Excessive overweight in puberty (SDS greater than +3) was associated with higher than expected morbidity and mortality in adult life. Weight-reducing measures should be started early in life to improve the unfavourable long-term prognosis for very obese children.
PubMed ID
2570196 View in PubMed
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[137 Cs body-burden in Norwegian civilian pilots]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44710
Source
Nord Med. 1967 Sep 7;78(36):1161-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-7-1967
Author
B. Hannisdahl
K. Madshus
A. Stromme
Source
Nord Med. 1967 Sep 7;78(36):1161-2
Date
Sep-7-1967
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Body Weight
Cesium Isotopes - analysis
Child
Humans
Male
Norway
PubMed ID
6057279 View in PubMed
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The 2014 Danish references from birth to 20 years for height, weight and body mass index.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256558
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2014 Feb;103(2):214-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Jeanette Tinggaard
Lise Aksglaede
Kaspar Sørensen
Annette Mouritsen
Christine Wohlfahrt-Veje
Casper P Hagen
Mikkel G Mieritz
Niels Jørgensen
Ole D Wolthers
Carsten Heuck
Jørgen Holm Petersen
Katharina M Main
Anders Juul
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2014 Feb;103(2):214-24
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Growth Charts
Humans
Infant
Male
Reference Values
Young Adult
Abstract
To construct new Danish growth charts for 0- to 20-year-olds and to compare them with Danish references from 1982 and with World Health Organization (WHO) standards for children aged 0-5 years from 2006, by applying similar inclusion and exclusion criteria.
Anthropometric data from three contemporary Danish population-based studies were combined. References for height were based on healthy Caucasian children born at term. A total of 12,671 height measurements (8055 in boys and 4616 in girls) were included. Reference charts were developed using the generalised additive models for location, scale and shape.
From prepubertal ages, a secular increase in height was observed for both genders. The differences were most pronounced in puberty, and final heights were increased by 1.4 cm in boys and 2.9 cm in girls compared to 1982 references. In boys, but not girls an upward shift in body mass index (BMI) above median levels was found. Reference curves for height were superimposable with standard curves based on the selective WHO criteria. Danish children were longer/taller and heavier and they had larger head circumferences than those reported in the recent multiethnic WHO standards.
We recommend national implementation of these contemporary 2014 Danish references for anthropometric measurements.
PubMed ID
24127859 View in PubMed
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Abdominal aortic and iliac artery compression following penetrating trauma: a study of feasibility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256470
Source
Prehosp Disaster Med. 2014 Jun;29(3):299-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Matthew Douma
Peter George Brindley
Author Affiliation
1Collaborative Program in Resuscitation Science, Faculty of Medicine,University of Toronto,Toronto,Ontario,Canada.
Source
Prehosp Disaster Med. 2014 Jun;29(3):299-302
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - etiology - therapy
Alberta
Aorta, Abdominal - injuries
Body Weight
Clinical Competence
Emergency Treatment - methods
Feasibility Studies
Female
Hemorrhage - etiology - prevention & control
Hemostatic Techniques
Humans
Iliac Artery - injuries
Male
Pressure
Sodium Chloride
Time Factors
Wounds, Penetrating - complications
Abstract
Penetrating junctional trauma is a leading cause of preventable death on the battlefield. Similarly challenging in civilian settings, exsanguination from the vessels of the abdomen, pelvis, and groin can occur in moments. Therefore, iliac artery or abdominal aortic compression has been recommended. Based on prior research, 120 lbs (54 kg) or 140 lbs (63 kg) of compression may be required to occlude these vessels, respectively. Whether most rescuers can generate this amount of compression is unknown.
To determine how many people in a convenience sample of 44 health care professionals can compress 120 lbs and 140 lbs.
This study simulated aortic and iliac artery compression. Consent was obtained from 44 clinicians (27 female; 17 male) from two large urban hospitals in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Participants compressed the abdominal model, which consisted of a medical scale and a 250 ml bag of saline, covered by a folded hospital blanket and placed on the ground. In random order, participants compressed a force they believed maintainable for 20 minutes ("maintainable effort") and then a maximum force they could maintain for two minutes ("maximum effort"). Compression was also performed with a knee. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the data.
Compression was directly proportional to the clinician's body weight. Participants compressed a mean of 55% of their body weight with two hands at a maintainable effort, and 69% at a maximum effort. At maintainable manual effort, participants compressed a mean of 86 lbs (39 kg). Sixteen percent could compress over 120 lbs, but none over 140 lbs. At maximum effort, participants compressed a mean of 108 lbs (48 kg). Thirty-four percent could compress greater than 120 lbs and 11% could compress greater than 140 lbs. Using a single knee, participants compressed a mean weight of 80% of their body weight with no difference between maintainable and maximum effort.
This work suggests that bimanual compression following penetrating junctional trauma is feasible. However, it is difficult, and is not likely achievable or sustainable by a majority of rescuers. Manual compression (used to temporize until device application and operative rescue) requires a large body mass. To maintain 140 lbs of compression (for example during a lengthy transport), participants needed to weigh 255 lbs (115 kg). Alternatively, they needed to weigh 203 lbs (92 kg) to be successful during brief periods. Knee compression may be preferable, especially for lower-weight rescuers.
PubMed ID
24913094 View in PubMed
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2445 records – page 1 of 245.