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397 records – page 1 of 40.

Additional records of the genus Colletes Latreille (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Colletidae) from Siberia, with a checklist of Russian species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277703
Source
Zootaxa. 2015 Apr 28;3949(3):323-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-28-2015
Author
Maxim Yu Proshchalykin
Michael Kuhlmann
Source
Zootaxa. 2015 Apr 28;3949(3):323-44
Date
Apr-28-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Structures - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Animals
Bees - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Body Size
Checklist
Female
Male
Organ Size
Russia
Siberia
Abstract
In addition to a previously published study about Siberian Colletes species, we here further report on poorly known species. Twenty six species are currently known from Siberia with C. cinerascens Morawitz 1893, C. kaszabi Kuhlmann 2002, and C. ebmeri Kuhlmann 2002 found in Russia for the first time and C. wacki Kuhlmann 2002 is newly recorded from the Asian part of Russia. The male of C. wacki is here described for the first time and a lectotype designated for the closely related C. conradti Noskiewicz 1936 to clarify the taxonomy of this group. Colletes uralensis Noskiewicz 1936 was erroneously recorded from Russia and is removed from the list of Russian species. Images and updated distribution maps are provided for the closely related C. kaszabi and C. uralensis as well as for C. conradti and C. wacki to facilitate their identification. An updated checklist of the 42 species of Colletes so far known from Russia is provided.
PubMed ID
25947811 View in PubMed
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Additional records of the genus Hylaeus Fabricius, 1793 (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Colletidae) from Siberia, with description of a new species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280417
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 Apr 21;4105(4):301-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-21-2016
Author
Maxim Yu Proshchalykin
Holger H Dathe
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 Apr 21;4105(4):301-20
Date
Apr-21-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Structures - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Animals
Bees - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Body Size
Ecosystem
Female
Male
Mongolia
Organ Size
Russia
Siberia
Abstract
As a supplement to a previously published study on Siberian Hylaeus species, we here report further records of twenty six rarely collected and little known species. Thirty two species are currently known from Siberia, including Hylaeus dorni Dathe, 1986, H. gredleri Förster, 1871, H. hungaricus (Alfken, 1905), H. moricei (Friese, 1898), H. nimbatus Dathe, 1986, H. oehlkei Dathe, 2010 and H. stubbei Dathe, 1986, which are reported from Russia for the first time, and H. brevicornis Nylander, 1852, H. communis Nylander, 1852, H. pfankuchi (Alfken, 1919) and H. styriacus Förster, 1871, which are newly recorded from Siberia. Hylaeus (Hylaeus) pesenkoi Proshchalykin & Dathe, sp. nov. is described as new from Siberia (Altai Republic and Tyva Republic) and neighbouring Mongolia (Khovd and Govi-Altai Aimags). The females of H. dorni Dathe, 1986 and H. oehlkei Dathe, 2010 are described for the first time; H. peregrinus Dathe, 1986 was recognised as the female of H. stubbei Dathe, 1986 and is treated as a new synonym.
PubMed ID
27394781 View in PubMed
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Age, size, and spatiotemporal variation in ovulation patterns of a seasonal breeder, the Norwegian moose (Alces alces).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90869
Source
Am Nat. 2009 Jan;173(1):89-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Garel Mathieu
Solberg Erling Johan
Saether Bernt-Erik
Grøtan Vidar
Tufto Jarle
Heim Morten
Author Affiliation
Université de Lyon, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique, Unité Mixte de Recherche 5558, Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, Villeurbanne F-69622, France. mgarel@biomserv.univ-lyon1.fr.
Source
Am Nat. 2009 Jan;173(1):89-104
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Body Size
Deer - physiology
Female
Geography
Models, Biological
Models, Statistical
Norway
Ovulation
Seasons
Abstract
In seasonal environments, timing of reproduction is an important fitness component. However, in ungulates, our understanding of this biological process is limited. Here we analyze how age and body mass affect spatiotemporal variation in timing of ovulation of 6,178 Norwegian moose. We introduced a parametric statistical model to obtain inferences about the seasonal timing of ovulation peak, the degree of synchrony among individuals, and the proportion of individuals that ovulate. These components showed much more spatiotemporal variation than previously reported. Young (primiparous) and old (> or =11.5 years of age) females ovulated later than prime-aged (2.5-10.5 years of age) females. In all age classes, ovulation was delayed with decreasing body mass. Ovulation rates were lower and more variable among primiparous females than among older females. Young females required higher body mass than older females did to ovulate. The body-mass-to-ovulation relationship varied with age, showed large regional variation, and differed among years within region. These results suggest that (1) environmental and population characteristics contribute to shape seasonal variation in the breeding pattern and (2) large regional variation exists in the size-dependent age at maturity in moose. Hence, the life-history trade-off between reproduction and body growth should differ regionally in moose.
PubMed ID
19072136 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking frequency in relation to subsequent changes in waist circumference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87026
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Apr;87(4):957-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Tolstrup Janne S
Halkjaer Jytte
Heitmann Berit L
Tjønneland Anne M
Overvad Kim
Sørensen Thorkild I A
Grønbaek Morten N
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol Research, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. jst@niph.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Apr;87(4):957-63
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - metabolism
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - metabolism
Body mass index
Body Size
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional studies have reported a lower prevalence of abdominal obese persons among frequent drinkers than among nonfrequent drinkers. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that drinking frequency is associated with subsequent changes in waist circumference. DESIGN: Data come from a prospective cohort study conducted in 1993-1997 (baseline) and 1999-2002 (follow-up) and included 43 543 men and women. Baseline information on alcohol drinking frequency was related to 1) change in waist circumference by linear regression and 2) major gain and major loss in waist circumference (defined as waist change in the lowest or highest quintile of waist changes) by polytomous logistic regression, also taking into account amount of alcohol intake. RESULTS: Drinking frequency was inversely associated with changes in waist circumference in women and was unassociated with changes in waist circumference in men. Drinking frequency was unassociated with major waist loss but was inversely associated with major waist gain: odds ratios among men were 0.97 (95% CI: 0.73, 1.28), 0.95 (95% CI: 0.81, 1.12), 0.88 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.99), 0.82 (95% CI: 0.71, -0.95), and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.69, 0.9) for never drinking, drinking on 1, 2-4, 5-6, and 7 d/wk, respectively, compared with men who drank alcohol on
PubMed ID
18400719 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake, insulin resistance, and abdominal obesity in elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162426
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jul;15(7):1766-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Ulf Risérus
Erik Ingelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism/Geriatrics, Uppsala Science Park, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. ulf.riserus@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jul;15(7):1766-73
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - physiopathology
Alcoholic Beverages
Beer
Body mass index
Body Size
Cohort Studies
Glucose Clamp Technique
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Obesity - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine
Abstract
Moderate and high alcohol intake have been associated with decreased and increased risk of type 2 diabetes, respectively. Insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and abdominal obesity are major predictors of diabetes, but the links with alcohol intake remain contradictory because of limited data.
In a population-based cohort of 807 men (age, 70 years), we studied whether alcohol intake was related to insulin sensitivity, measured with the gold standard technique (euglycemic clamp), insulin secretion (early insulin response), or adiposity [BMI, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio]. Alcohol intake was self-reported (questionnaire) and was assessed from a validated 7-day dietary record. The cross-sectional associations were evaluated using multivariable linear regression, adjusting for smoking, education level, physical activity, dietary total energy intake, hypertension, diabetes, triglycerides, and cholesterol.
In multivariable models, self-estimated alcohol intake was not related to insulin sensitivity, early insulin response, or BMI, but was positively related to WC (beta-coefficient, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.15 to 1.39; p=0.02) and waist-to-hip ratio (0.006 [0.002-0.009], p=0.003). The association with WC and waist-to-hip ratio was most pronounced in men in the lowest tertile of BMI. The results using dietary records were similar.
Evaluated in a large sample in elderly men, neither insulin sensitivity measured by clamp technique nor insulin secretion was significantly associated with alcohol intake. However, high alcohol intake was associated with abdominal obesity, which might explain the higher diabetes risk previously observed in high alcohol consumers.
PubMed ID
17636095 View in PubMed
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All stages of the Palaearctic predaceous midge Palpomyia schmidti Goetghebuer, 1934 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280986
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 Jul 08;4137(1):85-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-08-2016
Author
Ryszard Szadziewski
Larisa V Golovatyuk
Elzbieta Sontag
Aleksandra Urbanek
Tatiana D Zinchenko
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 Jul 08;4137(1):85-94
Date
Jul-08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Structures - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Animals
Body Size
Ceratopogonidae - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Female
Larva - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Male
Organ Size
Pupa - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Russia
Abstract
All stages and the ecology of the Southern Palaearctic Palpomyia schmidti collected from the vicinity of the saline Lake Elton in Russia are described and illustrated. The morphology of larvae and pupae as well as the detailed ecology of the larvae are described for the first time. P. schmidti is a halobiontic biting midge, widely distributed in the steppes and deserts of the Palaearctic region. It is proposed that the Palpomyia schmidti group should include five Holarctic species. P. downesi Grogan & Wirth, 1979 from north-western North America is recognized as a new junior synonym of the Eastern Palaearctic P. tuvae Remm, 1972. New synonymy.
PubMed ID
27395743 View in PubMed
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An annotated catalogue of the gamasid mites associated with small mammals in Asiatic Russia. The family Laelapidae s. str. (Acari: Mesostigmata: Gamasina).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280823
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 May 16;4111(3):223-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-16-2016
Author
Maxim V Vinarski
Natalia P Korallo-Vinarskaya
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 May 16;4111(3):223-45
Date
May-16-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Structures - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Animals
Body Size
Catalogs as Topic
Ecosystem
Female
Male
Mammals - parasitology
Mites - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Organ Size
Russia
Abstract
Twenty-nine species of mites of the family Laelapidae s. str. have been recorded as associated with small mammals (rodents, insectivores) in Asiatic Russia (Siberia and the Russian Far East). These species belong to two subfamilies (Laelapinae, Myonyssinae) and six genera: Androlaelaps Berlese, 1903, Dipolaelaps Zemskaya & Piontkovskaya, 1960, Laelaps C.L. Koch, 1836, Hyperlaelaps Zakhvatkin, 1948, Myonyssus Tiraboschi, 1904, Oryctolaelaps Lange, 1955. A list of the species, with data on synonymy, geographic ranges, and relationships with mammal hosts is provided. Some considerations concerning patterns of distribution of the parasitic Laelaptidae of Asiatic Russia are presented as well as their classifications from the point of view of known host association records.
PubMed ID
27395087 View in PubMed
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Ancistrocerus waldenii waldenii (Viereck 1906) (Hymenoptera: Vespidae, Eumeninae), a new addition to the fauna of Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273766
Source
Zootaxa. 2014;3838(1):143-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Emma Wahlberg
Guilherme C Baião
Sibylle Häggqvist
Svante Martinsson
Dario Pistone
Thomas Pape
Source
Zootaxa. 2014;3838(1):143-50
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Structures - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Animals
Body Size
Ecosystem
Female
Greenland
Male
Wasps - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Abstract
Ancistrocerus waldenii waldenii (Viereck 1906) is newly recorded from West Greenland. This is a new northern limit for the species.
PubMed ID
25081765 View in PubMed
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An indigenous religious ritual selects for resistance to a toxicant in a livebearing fish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140944
Source
Biol Lett. 2011 Apr 23;7(2):229-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-23-2011
Author
M. Tobler
Z W Culumber
M. Plath
K O Winemiller
G G Rosenthal
Author Affiliation
Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA. michi.tobler@gmail.com
Source
Biol Lett. 2011 Apr 23;7(2):229-32
Date
Apr-23-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animals
Body Size
Ceremonial Behavior
Drug Tolerance
Female
Humans
Male
Paullinia - toxicity
Poecilia - anatomy & histology - physiology
Religion
Sex Factors
Toxicity Tests
Abstract
Human-induced environmental change can affect the evolutionary trajectory of populations. In Mexico, indigenous Zoque people annually introduce barbasco, a fish toxicant, into the Cueva del Azufre to harvest fish during a religious ceremony. Here, we investigated tolerance to barbasco in fish from sites exposed and unexposed to the ritual. We found that barbasco tolerance increases with body size and differs between the sexes. Furthermore, fish from sites exposed to the ceremony had a significantly higher tolerance. Consequently, the annual ceremony may not only affect population structure and gene flow among habitat types, but the increased tolerance in exposed fish may indicate adaptation to human cultural practices in a natural population on a very small spatial scale.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20826470 View in PubMed
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An internet-based prospective study of body size and time-to-pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98836
Source
Hum Reprod. 2010 Jan;25(1):253-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Lauren A Wise
Kenneth J Rothman
Ellen M Mikkelsen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Anders Riis
Elizabeth E Hatch
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. lwise@bu.edu
Source
Hum Reprod. 2010 Jan;25(1):253-64
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Body Size
Body Weight
Denmark
Female
Fertility
Humans
Internet
Male
Obesity - complications
Overweight
Parity
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Thinness - complications
Time Factors
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Recent studies have shown that both female and male obesity may delay time-to-pregnancy (TTP). Little is known about central adiposity or weight gain and fecundability in women. METHODS: We examined the association between anthropometric factors and TTP among 1651 Danish women participating in an internet-based prospective cohort study of pregnancy planners (2007-2008). We categorized body mass index (BMI = kg/m(2)) as underweight ( or =35). We used discrete-time Cox regression to estimate fecundability ratios (FRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS: We found longer TTPs for overweight (FR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.70-1.00), obese (FR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.58-0.97), and very obese (FR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.42-0.88) women, compared with normal weight women. After further control for waist circumference, FRs for overweight, obese, and very obese women were 0.72 (95% CI = 0.58-0.90), 0.60 (95% CI = 0.42-0.85) and 0.48 (95% CI = 0.31-0.74), respectively. Underweight was associated with reduced fecundability among nulliparous women (FR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.63-1.06) and increased fecundability among parous women (FR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.08-2.39). Male BMI was not materially associated with TTP after control for female BMI. Compared with women who maintained a stable weight since age 17 (-5 to 4 kg), women who gained > or =15 kg had longer TTPs (FR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.59-0.88) after adjustment for BMI at age 17. Associations of waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio with TTP depended on adjustment for female BMI: null associations were observed before adjustment for BMI and weakly positive associations were observed after adjustment for BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm previous studies showing reduced fertility in overweight and obese women. The association between underweight and fecundability varied by parity.
PubMed ID
19828554 View in PubMed
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397 records – page 1 of 40.