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Acceptance of cosmetic surgery, body appreciation, body ideal internalization, and fashion blog reading among late adolescents in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108577
Source
Body Image. 2013 Sep;10(4):632-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Carolina Lunde
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: carolina.lunde@psy.gu.se.
Source
Body Image. 2013 Sep;10(4):632-5
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Blogging
Body Image - psychology
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Mass Media
Motivation - physiology
Personal Satisfaction
Sex Distribution
Social Values
Surgery, Plastic - psychology
Sweden
Thinness - psychology
Abstract
This study examined adolescents' attitudes of cosmetic surgery, as well as the relationships between these attitudes, body appreciation, body ideal internalization, and fashion blog reading. The sample comprised 110 (60 boys, 50 girls) late adolescents (mean age 16.9 years) from a Swedish high school. The results indicated that younger adolescents seem somewhat more accepting of cosmetic surgery. This was especially the case for boys' acceptance of social motives for obtaining cosmetic surgery (boys' M=2.3±1.55 vs. girls' M=1.7±0.89). Girls', and to a limited extent boys', internalization of the thin ideal was related to more favorable cosmetic surgery attitudes. Athletic ideal internalization and body appreciation were unrelated to these attitudes. Finally, girls who frequently read fashion blogs reported higher thin ideal internalization, and also demonstrated a slight tendency of more cosmetic surgery consideration.
PubMed ID
23871282 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescents' reasons for tanning and appearance motives: a preliminary study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106692
Source
Body Image. 2014 Jan;11(1):93-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Suzanne M Prior
Kimberley D Fenwick
Jasmine C Peterson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, St. Thomas University, Fredericton, NB, Canada. Electronic address: prior@stu.ca.
Source
Body Image. 2014 Jan;11(1):93-6
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Body Image - psychology
Canada
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Motivation - physiology
Personal Satisfaction
Sex Distribution
Sunbathing - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined adolescents' reasons for tanning and how these relate to appearance evaluation and orientation. Two hundred and sixty-four Canadian adolescents (age range 15-19 years) in grades 10, 11, and 12 completed a survey that included scales measuring their reasons for tanning, appearance evaluation, and appearance orientation. It was found that girls and boys differed on four of nine subscales measuring reasons for tanning. Girls believed more strongly than boys that tanning improved their general appearance and that friends influenced their decision to tan. Girls also expressed less concern than boys that tanning caused immediate skin damage or premature aging. The pattern of correlations between the reasons for tanning and appearance orientation was similar for girls and boys. For both, appearance reasons for tanning and sociocultural influences on tanning were positively associated with appearance orientation. Suggestions for future research with adolescents and a proposal for a guiding model are provided.
PubMed ID
24129215 View in PubMed
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Aggression and body image concerns among anabolic androgenic steroid users, contemplators, and controls in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266745
Source
Body Image. 2015 Jan;12:6-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Ida Heimly Jenssen
Kim Berg Johannessen
Source
Body Image. 2015 Jan;12:6-13
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Anabolic Agents - adverse effects
Body Image - psychology
Doping in Sports - psychology
Humans
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
AAS users and contemplators were investigated for differences in aggression and body image concern. Prevalence rates were sought as a secondary aim. 396 male adolescents at Norwegian high schools completed a questionnaire battery during school hours. Prevalence of AAS use showed 4.0%; AAS contemplation showed 5.1%. No significant differences between the AAS users and contemplators were found on levels of aggression and body image concern. AAS users and contemplators reported significantly higher levels of aggression and body image concern compared nonusing controls. AAS contemplators enhance understanding of AAS use by representing psychosocial factors contributing to increased aggression, and AAS use or risk thereof indicative of an aggressive personality profile. Body image concerns for AAS users and contemplators may indicate that AAS use does not diminish body image concern, and that body image concern is a risk factor for AAS use. This is supportive of previous research.
PubMed ID
25261635 View in PubMed
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Altered self-perception in adult survivors treated for a CNS tumor in childhood or adolescence: population-based outcomes compared with the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268808
Source
Neuro Oncol. 2015 May;17(5):733-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Lina Hörnquist
Jenny Rickardsson
Birgitta Lannering
Göran Gustafsson
Krister K Boman
Source
Neuro Oncol. 2015 May;17(5):733-40
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Image - psychology
Central Nervous System Neoplasms - psychology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Quality of Life
Self Concept
Survivors - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Survivors of pediatric CNS tumors are at risk for persistent tumor/treatment-related morbidity, physical disability and social consequences that may alter self-perception, vital for self-identity, mental health and quality of survival. We studied the long-term impact of childhood CNS tumors and their treatment on the self-perception of adult survivors and compared outcomes with those of the general population.
The cohort included 697 Swedish survivors diagnosed with a primary CNS tumor during 1982-2001. Comparison data were randomly collected from a stratified general population sample. Survivors and general population individuals were compared as regards self-perception in 5 domains: body image, sports/physical activities, peers, work, and family, and with a global self-esteem index. Within the survivor group, determinants of impact on self-perception were identified.
The final analyzed sample included 528 survivors, 75.8% of the entire national cohort. The control sample consisted of 995, 41% of 2500 addressed. Survivors had significantly poorer self-perception outcomes in domains of peers, work, body image, and sports/physical activities, and in the global self-perception measure, compared with those of the general population (all P
Notes
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PubMed ID
25332406 View in PubMed
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The ambivalence of losing weight after bariatric surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256833
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:22876
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Christine Warholm
Aud Marie Øien
Målfrid Råheim
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; warstine@hotmail.com.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:22876
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Bariatric Surgery - psychology
Body Image - psychology
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Norway
Self Concept
Social Behavior
Weight Loss - physiology
Abstract
This study is grounded in a phenomenological lifeworld perspective. It aims at providing rich descriptions of lived experience of the process of losing weight after obesity surgery. Two women participated in in-depth interviews four times each during the first postoperative year. Based on the women's experiences, a meaning structure--the ambivalence of losing weight after obesity surgery--was identified across the women's processes of change. This consisted of five core themes: movement and activity--freedom but new demands and old restraints; eating habits and digestion--the complexity of change; appearance--smaller, but looser; social relations--stability and change; and being oneself--vulnerability and self-assurance. These core themes changed over time in terms of dominance. The experience of ambivalence is discussed according to a phenomenological perspective of the body as lived experience.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24480033 View in PubMed
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Appearance-related cyberbullying: a qualitative investigation of characteristics, content, reasons, and effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265219
Source
Body Image. 2014 Sep;11(4):527-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Sofia Berne
Ann Frisén
Johanna Kling
Source
Body Image. 2014 Sep;11(4):527-33
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Body Image - psychology
Bullying - psychology
Depression - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore 15-year-old adolescents' experiences of appearance-related cyberbullying. Twenty-seven adolescents participated in four focus groups. The adolescents in this study perceived that it is common to be targeted in appearance-related cyberbullying, especially for girls, and that appearance-related cyberbullying is considered to be a potent strategy when attempting to hurt girls. Girls often received comments about being fat, while among boys, it was common to receive comments about looking or seeming "gay." According to the adolescents, an important reason for engaging in appearance-related cyberbullying was to attain higher social status in the peer group. The girls and boys reacted differently to appearance-related cyberbullying. Boys tended to act out or take no offence, while girls experienced lower self-esteem and feelings of depression. Findings in this study contribute to research on cyberbullying as well as to research on girls' body esteem development.
PubMed ID
25194309 View in PubMed
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Aspects of body image after mastectomy due to breast cancer - a two-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119640
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2013 Jun;17(3):340-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Ulrika Fallbjörk
Birgit H Rasmussen
Stig Karlsson
Pär Salander
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. ulrika.fallbjork@nurs.umu.se
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2013 Jun;17(3):340-5
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Body Image - psychology
Breast Neoplasms - pathology - psychology - surgery
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Mammaplasty - statistics & numerical data
Mastectomy - methods - psychology
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
This 2-year follow-up study explores aspects of body image after mastectomy due to breast cancer.
This population-based study included 76 women living in northern Sweden who, during November 2006 to October 2007, underwent mastectomy due to breast cancer. The women completed a questionnaire entitled "Life After Mastectomy (LAM)" 10 months after the mastectomy and again 2 years later. We used SPSS version 18.0 for data processing and analysis.
The findings indicate that few significant changes in body image had taken place during the 2-year interval between the first and second completion of the questionnaire. An exception was a significant decrease in feelings of sexual attractiveness and comfort during sexual intimacy. At follow-up, 21% of the women had undergone breast reconstruction (BR). They were significantly younger than the women who had not had BR (53 vs. 63 years). Besides being younger, no other significant differences could be found between those women who had undergone BR and those who had not. The fact that the decrease in sexual attractiveness and feelings of comfort during sexual intimacy also applied to the subgroup of women who had had BR may therefore be surprising. A better understanding of issues related to breast cancer treatment and sexual function is vital.
It is important for health care professionals to be aware of problems related to sexual intimacy and to be prepared not just to provide information about these, but also to reflect on expectations vs. reality together with the women.
PubMed ID
23083641 View in PubMed
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Association between higher BMI and depressive symptoms in Icelandic adolescents: the mediational function of body image.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264963
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Dec;24(6):888-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Sigridur T Eidsdottir
Alfgeir L Kristjansson
Inga Dora Sigfusdottir
Carol E Garber
John P Allegrante
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Dec;24(6):888-92
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Image - psychology
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
Weight status and depressive affect in adolescents are positively related constructs, but the nature of this relationship is not well understood, especially in European populations. The objective of this study was to examine the interplay between body mass index (BMI) and depressive symptoms, while accounting for the possible mediational role of body image, in a sample of older adolescents in Iceland.
We utilized data from a population-based cross-sectional sample of 11 388 junior college students (16-20-year-olds) to conduct structural equation modelling to test the relationship between BMI, body image and depressive symptoms while controlling for socioeconomic status and other background variables.
Higher levels of BMI are associated with higher depressive symptoms. However, this association was mediated entirely through perceptions of body image. The association is gender dependent, with the relationship between BMI levels and depressive symptoms being significantly stronger among junior college girls than boys.
Body image is a key contributor in the relationship between weight status and depressive symptoms among adolescents. Future interventions with adolescents should take this association into account and focus on such factors as physical confidence and self-esteem.
PubMed ID
24280872 View in PubMed
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Association of self-perceived body image with body mass index and type 2 diabetes-The ADDITION-PRO study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268740
Source
Prev Med. 2015 Jun;75:64-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Mette Bjerggaard
Annelotte Philipsen
Marit E Jørgensen
Morten Charles
Daniel R Witte
Annelli Sandbæk
Torsten Lauritzen
Kristine Færch
Source
Prev Med. 2015 Jun;75:64-9
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body Image - psychology
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Waist Circumference
Weight Loss
Abstract
Weight loss is important for prevention of type 2 diabetes and an accurate self-perceived body image can promote weight reduction. We evaluated the association of self-perceived body image with body mass index (BMI) and type 2 diabetes.
Data from the Danish ADDITION-PRO cohort study (2009-2011) were used. A total of 2082 men and women attended a health examination including assessment of BMI, waist circumference, the Stunkard scale of self-perceived obesity and an oral glucose tolerance test for assessment of diabetes risk.
Mean (SD) age was 66.2 (6.9) years and 24% were obese (BMI =30kg/m(2)). However, only 7% of obese men and 11% of obese women perceived themselves as obese. Among obese women, for a given level of BMI and waist circumference, one unit higher self-perceived body image was associated with 52% (95% CI: 14-73) lower risk of having type 2 diabetes and 45% (95% CI: 12-65) lower risk of having pre-diabetes. Overweight, but not obese, men had a 35% (95% CI: 36-56) lower risk of type 2 diabetes per unit increase in body image.
Obese individuals seem to underestimate their body shape. However, having a realistic body image (higher self-perceived obesity) is independently associated with lower diabetes risk. Self-perceived body image might serve as a valuable tool for type 2 diabetes risk assessment.
PubMed ID
25838208 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards obesity in the Swedish general population: the role of one's own body size, weight satisfaction, and controllability beliefs about obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105993
Source
Body Image. 2014 Jan;11(1):43-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Lena M Hansson
Finn Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Child and Adolescent Public Health Epidemiology Group, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: lena.hansson@ki.se.
Source
Body Image. 2014 Jan;11(1):43-50
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Body Image - psychology
Body Size
Body Weight - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Social Class
Stereotyping
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examined the associations of different socio-demographic and psychological factors with attitudes towards obesity. Individuals with different weight status (N=2436) were drawn from an annual population-based survey in Sweden, and data on attitudes towards obesity (ATOP) and predictor variables were assessed in 2008. The strongest predictor of ATOP was controllability beliefs about obesity (ß=0.83). Thus, greater controllability beliefs about obesity predicted more negative attitudes. Sex and weight satisfaction were also independently associated with ATOP. However, there was no, or only a weak, association between weight satisfaction and ATOP among individuals with normal weight or overweight. And the higher the weight satisfactions of individuals with obesity, the more positive were their attitudes. It seems that stigma-reduction strategies in the general public should address the uncontrollable factors in the aetiology of obesity. However, more research is needed to understand the underlying causes of people's attitudes towards obesity.
PubMed ID
24268600 View in PubMed
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67 records – page 1 of 7.