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Adult body height of twins compared with that of singletons: a register-based birth cohort study of Norwegian males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115100
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2013 May 1;177(9):1015-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2013
Author
Willy Eriksen
Jon M Sundet
Kristian Tambs
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2013 May 1;177(9):1015-9
Date
May-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth Certificates
Body Height - genetics
Cohort Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Regression Analysis
Siblings
Twins
Young Adult
Abstract
In the present study, we evaluated whether childhood differences in body height between singletons and twins persist into adulthood. Data from the Medical Birth Register of Norway were linked with data from the Norwegian National Conscript Service. This study used data on the 457,999 males who were born alive and without physical anomalies in single or twin births in Norway during 1967-1984 and who were examined at the mandatory military conscription (age 18-20 years; 1985-2003). For sibling comparisons, the authors selected the 1,721 sibships of full brothers that included at least 1 male born in a single birth and at least 1 male born in a twin birth (4,520 persons, including 2,493 twins and 2,027 singletons). An analysis of the total study population using generalized estimating equations showed that the twins were 0.6 cm (95% confidence interval: 0.4, 0.7) shorter than were the singletons after adjustment for a series of background factors. The fixed-effects regression analysis of the sibships that included both twins and singletons showed that the twins were 0.9 cm (95% confidence interval: 0.6, 1.2) shorter than were their singleton brothers. The study suggests that male twins born in Norway during 1967-1984 were slightly shorter in early adulthood than were singletons.
PubMed ID
23543161 View in PubMed
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The association between body height and coronary heart disease among Finnish twins and singletons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185883
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Feb;32(1):78-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Karri Silventoinen
Jaakko Kaprio
Markku Koskenvuo
Eero Lahelma
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, USA. silventoinen@epi.umn.edu
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Feb;32(1):78-82
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body Height - genetics
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Risk
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
An inverse association between body height and the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) has been observed. However, the mechanisms behind this association are still largely unknown. We will examine the role of genetic and familial factors behind the association in a large twin data set.
The data were derived from the Finnish Twin cohort including 2438 singletons, 4073 monozygotic (MZ) twins, and 9202 dizygotic (DZ) twins aged 25-69 years at baseline in 1976. Incident CHD cases were derived from hospital discharge data and cause of death data between 1977 and 1995. Cox regression analysis and conditional logistic regression analysis were used.
In population-level analyses no differences in the general risk of CHD between zygosity groups were found. The association between body height and CHD was similar between sexes and zygosity groups. When men and women in all zygosity groups were studied together an increased risk of CHD was found only among the shortest quartile (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.14-1.57). Among the twin pairs discordant for CHD a suggestive increased risk for the shorter twin was seen among DZ twins (odds ratio [OR] = 1.19, 95% CI: 0.95-1.48) when men and women were studied together.
An inverse association between body height and CHD was broadly similar between sexes and twin zygosity groups and was associated with short stature. Among discordant twin pairs we found a weak association among DZ twins but not MZ twins. This may suggest the role of genetic liability behind the association between body height and CHD.
PubMed ID
12690014 View in PubMed
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The association between height and birth order: evidence from 652,518 Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256596
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013 Jul;67(7):571-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Mikko Myrskylä
Karri Silventoinen
Aline Jelenkovic
Per Tynelius
Finn Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Max Planck Research Group Lifecourse Dynamics and Demographic Change, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany. myrskyla@demogr.mpg.de
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013 Jul;67(7):571-7
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Order
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Height - genetics - physiology
Cohort Studies
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Male
Maternal Age
Military Personnel
Registries
Regression Analysis
Siblings
Social Class
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Birth order is associated with outcomes such as birth weight and adult socioeconomic position (SEP), but little is known about the association with adult height. This potential birth order-height association is important because height predicts health, and because the association may help explain population-level height trends. We studied the birth order-height association and whether it varies by family characteristics or birth cohort.
We used the Swedish Military Conscription Register to analyse adult height among 652,518 men born in 1951-1983 using fixed effects regression models that compare brothers and account for genetic and social factors shared by brothers. We stratified the analysis by family size, parental SEP and birth cohort. We compared models with and without birth weight and birth length controls.
Unadjusted analyses showed no differences between the first two birth orders but in the fixed effects regression, birth orders 2, 3 and 4 were associated with 0.4, 0.7 and 0.8 cm (p
PubMed ID
23645856 View in PubMed
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Association of the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) gene with body height in adult males from two Swedish population cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93429
Source
PLoS One. 2008;3(3):e1807
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Dahlgren Andreas
Lundmark Per
Axelsson Tomas
Lind Lars
Syvänen Ann-Christine
Author Affiliation
Molecular Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2008;3(3):e1807
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Height - genetics
Cohort Studies
Estrogen Receptor alpha - genetics
Genetics, Population
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Abstract
Human body height is a complex genetic trait with high heritability. We performed an association study of 17 candidate genes for height in the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM) that consists of 1153 elderly men of age 70 born in the central region of Sweden. First we genotyped a panel of 137 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) evenly distributed across the candidate genes in the ULSAM cohort. We identified 4 SNPs in the estrogen receptor gene (ESR1) on chromosome 6q25.1 with suggestive signals of association (p
PubMed ID
18350145 View in PubMed
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Associations between polymorphisms related to calcium metabolism and human height: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126446
Source
Ann Hum Genet. 2012 May;76(3):200-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Rolf Jorde
Johan Svartberg
Ragnar Martin Joakimsen
Guri Grimnes
Author Affiliation
Tromsø Endocrine Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. rolf.jorde@unn.no
Source
Ann Hum Genet. 2012 May;76(3):200-10
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body Height - genetics
Calcium - blood - metabolism
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Phosphates - blood
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Receptors, Calcitriol - genetics
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
A number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to height have been detected. Calcium metabolism is important for the skeleton and accordingly also for adult height. Therefore, in the present study, nine SNPs related to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene and serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), calcium, phosphate and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were related to height in 9471 subjects. Relation with height was evaluated with linear regression for trend across SNP genotypes with age and gender as covariates. After correcting for multiple testing, significant associations with height were found for two SNPs related to the VDR gene (rs1544410 (Bsml) and rs7975232 (Apal)), one SNP related to serum 25(OH)D (rs3829251 at the DHCR7/NADSYN1 gene), one SNP related to serum calcium (rs1459015 at the PTH gene) and one SNP related to serum phosphate (rs1697421 at the ALPL gene). For rs3829251, the mean differences in height between major and minor homozygotes were 1.5-2.0 cm (P
PubMed ID
22390397 View in PubMed
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Assortative mating by body height and BMI: Finnish twins and their spouses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183812
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2003 Sep-Oct;15(5):620-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Karri Silventoinen
Jaakko Kaprio
Eero Lahelma
Richard J Viken
Richard J Rose
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55454-1015, USA. silventoinen@epi.umn.edu
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2003 Sep-Oct;15(5):620-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body Height - genetics
Body mass index
Body Weight - genetics
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Social Behavior
Spouses - psychology
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
Assortative mating by body height and weight is well established in various populations, but its causal mechanisms remain poorly understood. We analyzed the effect of phenotypic assortment and social homogamy on spousal correlations for body height and body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)). Our data derived from a questionnaire administered to the adult Finnish Twin Cohort in 1990 (response rate 77%) yielding results from 922 monozygotic and 1697 dizygotic adult twin pairs who reported information about their body height and weight and that of their spouses. Assortative mating was evident for body height and BMI. For body height, the effects of social homogamy (0.24 in men and 0.29 in women) and phenotypic assortment (0.27 and 0.28, respectively) were about the same. For BMI, the effect of social homogamy was stronger (0.31 in men and 0.28 in women) than the effect of phenotypic assortment (0.13 in both men and women). When assortative mating was taken into account, shared environmental factors had no effect on phenotypic variation in body height or BMI. Our results show that assortative mating needs to be considered in population genetic studies of body height and weight.
PubMed ID
12953173 View in PubMed
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Asthma and height in twins: a cohort and within-pair analyses study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268279
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2015 Apr;18(2):142-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Jennifer L P Protudjer
Cecilia Lundholm
Catarina Almqvist
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2015 Apr;18(2):142-50
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenarche - genetics
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology - genetics
Body Height - genetics
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Menarche - genetics
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Abstract
In singletons, asthma may be associated with shorter height and delayed growth during adolescence. Yet, these studies do not account for heritability of asthma, puberty/menarche, and height. We aimed to study the association between asthma and puberty in boys and menarche in girls, and height, in a cohort of twins and subsequently in same-sex twin pairs discordant for asthma. From a Swedish twin cohort, parent- and self-reported data on asthma, puberty/menarche, and height were collected. Pubertal staging was established via the Petersen index. Logistic and linear regression was used to estimate associations between asthma and puberty/menarche and height, respectively. For within-pair analyses in twins discordant for asthma, conditional logistic and linear regression were used. Data on 2,658 (49.1% boys) twins were included. Among boys, asthma prevalence was 8.2% at 8-9 years and 10.2% at 13-14 years. Corresponding numbers for girls were 4.2% and 4.9%, respectively. In the entire cohort, no statistically significant associations were found between current asthma and puberty/menarche. Boys with asthma were shorter than boys without asthma at 8-9 years (on average, 1.86 [0.17-3.56] cm, p = .03) and at 13-14 years (on average, 2.94 [0.98-4.91] cm, p = .003) but not at 19-20 years. No such associations were found for girls. Within same-sex twin pairs discordant for asthma, no statistically significant associations were found for either sex. Twin boys, but not girls, with asthma were shorter than those without asthma. Non-statistically significant estimates from within-pair analyses suggest the association is partly confounded by genetic or familial environmental factors.
PubMed ID
25761570 View in PubMed
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Birth weight and length as predictors for adult height.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58893
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Apr 15;149(8):726-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1999
Author
H T Sørensen
S. Sabroe
K J Rothman
M. Gillman
F H Steffensen
P. Fischer
T I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre at the Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Aarhus.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Apr 15;149(8):726-9
Date
Apr-15-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Weight - genetics
Body Height - genetics
Denmark
Embryonic and Fetal Development - genetics
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Phenotype
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Adult height has been found to be inversely associated with mortality. Recently, it has been suggested that growth in utero is linked with adult risk of several chronic diseases. The authors examined possible associations between birth weight, birth length, and adult height in young Danish men. They conducted the study in the fifth conscription district of Denmark including all the men born after January 1, 1973 who were residents in the study area during the period August 1, 1993 to July 31, 1994. The Danish Medical Birth Register contains information on all births in Denmark since January 1, 1973. Data on height from the Conscription Register were linked to the Danish Medical Birth Register in 4,300 conscripts examined. Nearly all Danish men have to register with the draft board around age 18 years of age where they undergo a physical examination. There was a strong positive association between birth weight and adult height; for subjects with birth weight or = 4,501 g, mean height was 184.1 cm. A positive association was also found between birth length and adult height. For subjects with birth length 56 cm. The associations between birth length and adult height persisted after adjustment for birth weight, gestational age, and other confounders, while the associations between birth weight and adult height almost disappeared when adjusting for birth length and the same confounders. Genetic and/or environmental factors operating both during the pre- and postnatal period may be responsible for the association between birth length and adult height.
PubMed ID
10206622 View in PubMed
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Childhood growth and future development of psychotic disorder among Helsinki high-risk children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174506
Source
Schizophr Res. 2005 Jul 1;76(1):105-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2005
Author
Laura T Niemi
Jaana M Suvisaari
Jari K Haukka
Jouko K Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, KTL, National Public Health Institute, Mannerheimintie, Helsinki, Finland. laura.niemi@ktl.fi
Source
Schizophr Res. 2005 Jul 1;76(1):105-12
Date
Jul-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Body Height - genetics
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Reference Values
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - genetics
Schizotypal Personality Disorder - diagnosis - genetics
Sex Factors
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
The Helsinki High-Risk (HR) Study is a follow-up study of offspring (born between 1960 and 1964) of all females treated for schizophrenia spectrum disorders in mental hospitals in Helsinki before 1975, and controls.
To compare childhood growth among HR and control children, and to determine if any patterns in childhood growth predict later development of psychotic disorders within the HR group.
We accessed growth information from childhood health cards, which we obtained for 114 HR and 53 control offspring. The growth of HR children was compared with that of control children. Within the HR group, we investigated whether any association existed between childhood growth patterns and morbidity from psychotic disorders using logistic regression models.
The HR girls were shorter than controls at birth (p=0.030), but this disparity vanished by age 7. In contrast, HR boys were only slightly shorter at birth than controls, but the height difference increased with age, being statistically significant at 10 years (p=0.020). Among HR children, the combination of being in the lowest tertile for ponderal index at birth but in the highest tertile for BMI at 7 years predicted later development of schizophrenia (OR 22.8, 95% CI 2.0, >100, p=0.040).
Catch-up growth increases the risk of schizophrenia among offspring of mothers with psychotic disorder. Whether this is an independent risk factor or merely a reflection of some other risk factors needs further research.
PubMed ID
15927804 View in PubMed
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Common variants in the region around Osterix are associated with bone mineral density and growth in childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90229
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2009 Apr 15;18(8):1510-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2009
Author
Timpson Nicholas J
Tobias Jon H
Richards J Brent
Soranzo Nicole
Duncan Emma L
Sims Anne-Marie
Whittaker Pamela
Kumanduri Vasudev
Zhai Guangju
Glaser Beate
Eisman John
Jones Graeme
Nicholson Geoff
Prince Richard
Seeman Ego
Spector Tim D
Brown Matthew A
Peltonen Leena
Smith George Davey
Deloukas Panos
Evans David M
Author Affiliation
MRC Centre for Causal Analyses in Translational Epidemiology, Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2009 Apr 15;18(8):1510-7
Date
Apr-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body Height - genetics
Bone Density - genetics
Child
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Transcription Factors - genetics
Abstract
Peak bone mass achieved in adolescence is a determinant of bone mass in later life. In order to identify genetic variants affecting bone mineral density (BMD), we performed a genome-wide association study of BMD and related traits in 1518 children from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). We compared results with a scan of 134 adults with high or low hip BMD. We identified associations with BMD in an area of chromosome 12 containing the Osterix (SP7) locus, a transcription factor responsible for regulating osteoblast differentiation (ALSPAC: P = 5.8 x 10(-4); Australia: P = 3.7 x 10(-4)). This region has previously shown evidence of association with adult hip and lumbar spine BMD in an Icelandic population, as well as nominal association in a UK population. A meta-analysis of these existing studies revealed strong association between SNPs in the Osterix region and adult lumbar spine BMD (P = 9.9 x 10(-11)). In light of these findings, we genotyped a further 3692 individuals from ALSPAC who had whole body BMD and confirmed the association in children as well (P = 5.4 x 10(-5)). Moreover, all SNPs were related to height in ALSPAC children, but not weight or body mass index, and when height was included as a covariate in the regression equation, the association with total body BMD was attenuated. We conclude that genetic variants in the region of Osterix are associated with BMD in children and adults probably through primary effects on growth.
PubMed ID
19181680 View in PubMed
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52 records – page 1 of 6.