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40-year follow-up of overweight children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38058
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-1989
Author
H O Mossberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Date
Aug-26-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Birth weight
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - genetics - mortality
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Reference Standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
504 overweight children admitted to hospital between 1921 and 1947 were followed up for 40 years by questionnaires at 10 year intervals. The mean weight for height (W/H) standard deviation score (SDS) reached a maximum in puberty (+3.5). The SDS fell to about +1 in adulthood. 47% patients were still obese (SDS greater than +1) in adulthood; 84.6% of these had SDS more than +2 in childhood. The degree of obesity in the family (parents and grandparents) and the degree of overweight in puberty were the most important factors for weight level in adulthood. Even when their food intake was in accordance with recommended levels, obese children had higher than normal weight as adults. Excessive overweight in puberty (SDS greater than +3) was associated with higher than expected morbidity and mortality in adult life. Weight-reducing measures should be started early in life to improve the unfavourable long-term prognosis for very obese children.
PubMed ID
2570196 View in PubMed
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Adult height in relation to risk of cancer in a cohort of Canadian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122928
Source
Int J Cancer. 2013 Mar 1;132(5):1125-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2013
Author
Geoffrey C Kabat
Moonseong Heo
Victor Kamensky
Anthony B Miller
Thomas E Rohan
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. geoffrey.kabat@einstein.yu.edu
Source
Int J Cancer. 2013 Mar 1;132(5):1125-32
Date
Mar-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Although the influence of body mass index on cancer risk has been intensively investigated, few epidemiologic studies have examined the association of adult height with risk of cancer. We assessed the association of height with risk of all cancer and of 19 site-specific cancers in the Canadian National Breast Screening Study, a prospective cohort of nearly 90,000 women. Weight and height were measured at enrollment, and information on reproductive and medical history as well as lifestyle exposures was obtained by means of questionnaire. After exclusions, 5,679 incident invasive cancers were identified among 88,256 women. We used Cox proportional hazards model to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) per 10 cm increase in height. All tests of statistical significance were two sided. All cancers combined and ten specific sites (colorectum, colon, premenopausal breast, postmenopausal breast, endometrium, ovary, kidney, thyroid, melanoma and leukemia) showed statistically significant positive associations with height. The HR for all cancers combined was 1.13 (95% CI: 1.08-1.18), and the magnitude of the associations for specific sites ranged from HR 1.11 (95% CI: 1.03-1.20) for postmenopausal breast cancer to HR 1.51 (95% CI: 1.27-1.80) for melanoma. Our study provides strong support for a positive association of adult height with risk of certain cancers. The underlying biological mechanisms are not clear but may differ by anatomic site.
PubMed ID
22753236 View in PubMed
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Adult height, insulin, and 17beta-estradiol in young women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89089
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 May;18(5):1477-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Finstad Sissi Espetvedt
Emaus Aina
Tretli Steinar
Jasienska Grazyna
Ellison Peter T
Furberg Anne-Sofie
Wist Erik A
Thune Inger
Author Affiliation
The Cancer Center, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Oslo 0407, Norway. sissi.espetvedt@medisin.uio.no
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 May;18(5):1477-83
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Body Height
Breast Neoplasms - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Estradiol - metabolism
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Linear Models
Norway
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Saliva - chemistry
Tumor Markers, Biological - metabolism
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Adult height and insulin are thought to modify the development of breast cancer. However, little is known about the association between height and 17beta-estradiol, a key factor in breast carcinogenesis, and whether insulin modifies such an association. METHODS: Among 204 healthy women, ages 25 to 35 years, who participated in the Energy Balance and Breast Cancer Aspect I study, adult height (in centimeters) and fasting serum concentrations of insulin (pmol/L) were measured. 17beta-Estradiol concentrations were measured in daily saliva samples throughout an entire menstrual cycle through RIA. Age and multivariate linear regression models were used to study the association between adult height and 17beta-estradiol levels throughout an entire menstrual cycle and whether serum levels of fasting insulin may modify such an association. RESULTS: The women had a mean age of 30.7 years, adult height of 166.9 cm, and serum insulin of 85.7 pmol/L. For each increase of one SD in insulin levels in the upper tertile of adult height, the adjusted level of 17beta-estradiol increased by 3.1 pmol/L (95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.2), equivalent to a 17.3% higher mean average concentration of 17beta-estradiol. Women with an adult height > or =170 cm (upper tertile) and insulin levels >101 pmol/L (upper quartile) experienced, on average, 41% higher 17beta-estradiol levels throughout the entire menstrual cycle compared with women with the same adult height and insulin levels
PubMed ID
19423524 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric measurements and the incidence of low back pain in a cohort of pubertal children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217965
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1994 Jun 15;19(12):1367-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1994
Author
M. Nissinen
M. Heliövaara
J. Seitsamo
H. Alaranta
M. Poussa
Author Affiliation
Laakso Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1994 Jun 15;19(12):1367-70
Date
Jun-15-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Cohort Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Prevalence
Puberty
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
The authors studied the anthropometric measurements to predict low back pain (LBP) in a cohort of growing adolescents.
The cohort consisted of all the fourth-grade school children of the western school district of Helsinki, Finland, in the spring of 1986. They were examined annually from the mean age of 11.8 to 13.8 years.
The forward bending test, measurements of total arm length, pelvic equilibrium, and spinal pantographs were carried out by the same physiatrist. A standardized pain questionnaire presented at the final examination obtained the history of LBP. Of the original cohort of 1060 children, those 859 (408 girls and 451 boys) who participated in all the examinations and had not had LBP until the age of 12.8 years were included in this study.
The 1-year (from 12.8 to 13.8 years) incidence of LBP was 18.4% in girls and 16.9% in boys. Trunk asymmetry measured by the forward bending test and sitting height were significant determinants of the incidence of LBP. In the whole cohort, the odds ratio (OR) of trunk asymmetry adjusted for all the other risk determinants was 1.19 and its confidence interval (CI) was 1.00-1.39 per one standard deviation increase of the trunk hump. In the multivariate analysis comprising both sexes, OR per one standard deviation increase of sitting height was 1.24, (95% CI 1.03-1.46). In boys, standing height (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.13-1.65, per one standard deviation) and sitting height (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.09-1.63, per one standard deviation) were positively associated with the risk of LBP. These associations were not significant in girls.
Sitting height and trunk asymmetry may contribute to LBP in pubertal children. The role of anthropometric characteristics seems, however, modest.
PubMed ID
8066517 View in PubMed
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Anthropometry and prostate cancer risk: a prospective study of 22,248 Norwegian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20833
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Aug;10(4):269-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
T I Nilsen
L J Vatten
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, University Medical Center, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Aug;10(4):269-75
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body Height
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Few risk factors for prostate cancer are known, but both endocrine changes and dietary factors have been implicated in the etiology of the disease. Anthropometry may therefore provide a tool in the search for carcinogenic mechanisms connected to these suggested causal components. METHODS: We have studied the association between body size and prostate cancer risk in a prospective study of 22,248 Norwegian men. During 12 years of follow-up, 642 men developed cancer of the prostate. A possible association between anthropometry (height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and lean body mass (LBM)) and prostate cancer risk was assessed using Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: Overall, we observed no significant trend for any of the variables studied, although an excess risk of prostate cancer with increasing height was suggested by an age-adjusted relative risk of 1.2 (95% CI = 0.9-1.6) for the tallest compared to the shortest quintile of men. None of the other three variables (weight, BMI, and LBM) displayed any consistent relation with the risk of prostate cancer. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that these results do not indicate a strong association between anthropometric factors and risk of prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
10482485 View in PubMed
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Assessing social differences in overweight among 15- to 16-year-old ethnic Norwegians from Oslo by register data and adolescent self-reported measures of socio-economic status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81775
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2007 Jan;31(1):30-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Lien N.
Kumar B N
Holmboe-Ottesen G.
Klepp K-I
Wandel M.
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, Blindern, Oslo, Norway. nanna.lien@medisin.uio.no
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2007 Jan;31(1):30-8
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Income
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Occupations
Parents
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine to what extent self-reported and objective data on socio-economic status (SES) are associated with overweight/obesity among 15 to 16-year-old ethnic Norwegians. DESIGN: A cross-sectional questionnaire study on health and health-related behaviors. SUBJECTS: All school children aged 15-16 years old in 2000 and 2001 in Oslo, Norway. Response rate 88% (n=7343). This article is based on the data from the 5498 ethnic Norwegians. MEASUREMENTS: Self-reported height and weight were used to measure overweight (including obesity) as defined by the International Obesity Task Force cutoffs at the nearest half-year intervals. SES was determined by register data from Statistics Norway on residential area, parental education and income and by adolescent self-reported measures on parental occupation and adolescents' educational plans. RESULTS: The prevalence of overweight/obesity was low, but higher among boys (11%) than among girls (6%). Parental education (four levels) showed the clearest inverse gradients with overweight/obesity (boys: 18, 13, 10 and 7%; girls: 11, 6, 6 and 4%). Parental education remained significantly associated with overweight/obesity when adding occupation and income to the model for the boys, whereas there were no significant associations in the final model for the girls. Overweight/obesity was associated with a lower odds ratio of planning for higher education (college/university) among boys only. CONCLUSION: For the boys, parental education was most strongly associated with overweight/obesity, and the association between overweight/obesity and educational plans appears to imply downward social mobility. The relationships between the various SES measures and overweight/obesity appeared more interrelated for the girls.
PubMed ID
16788570 View in PubMed
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Associations between body height, body composition and cholesterol levels in middle-aged men. the coronary risk factor study in southern Sweden (CRISS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53752
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2001;17(6):521-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
K M Henriksson
U. Lindblad
B. Agren
P. Nilsson-Ehle
L. Råstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Sweden. karin.henriksson@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2001;17(6):521-6
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Composition
Body Height
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - complications
Hypertension - complications
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Short body height is associated with increased risk for coronary heart disease; however, mechanisms are not fully explained. In this study, associations between body height and serum cholesterol, non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL cholesterol) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol) were investigated. METHODS: Prospective cohort study of middle-aged men from Helsingborg, Sweden starting 1990. Two birth-year cohorts were invited at 37, 40 and 43 years of age; participation at baseline was 991 (68%). Serum and HDL cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, weight, height, waist and hip circumferences were measured. Non-HDL cholesterol, body mass index (BMI) and waist/ hip ratio (WHR) were calculated. The participants completed a questionnaire covering lifestyle variables. RESULTS: There were statistically significant inverse correlations between body height and serum cholesterol (-0.11) and non-HDL cholesterol (-0.12). One standard deviation, 6.7 cm, taller body height was associated with a lower serum cholesterol (-0.12 mmol/l) and a lower non-HDL cholesterol (-0.13 m mol/l; p
PubMed ID
11949723 View in PubMed
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The associations of age, lifestyle factors and chronic disease with testosterone in men: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18285
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2003 Aug;149(2):145-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Johan Svartberg
Monica Midtby
Kaare H Bønaa
Johan Sundsfjord
Ragnar M Joakimsen
Rolf Jorde
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, N-9038, Tromsø, Norway. johan.svartberg@unn.no
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2003 Aug;149(2):145-52
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Algorithms
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Chronic Disease
Coffee
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Population
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Smoking - blood
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study whether lifestyle factors and/or chronic disease are associated with the age-related decline of total and free testosterone in men, or if these factors might be associated with the variation of total and free testosterone but not with their age-related decline. DESIGN: A population-based, cross-sectional study was used. METHODS: Total testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels were analyzed and free testosterone levels were calculated in 1563 men participating in the Tromsø study in 1994/1995. Anthropometric characteristics were also measured and two standardized questionnaires completed, including lifestyle factors and medical history. The data were analyzed with multiple linear regression analysis of covariance, and logistic regression. RESULTS: Total and free testosterone were inversely associated (P=0.001 and P
PubMed ID
12887292 View in PubMed
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Behavioural and metabolic characterisation of the low satiety phenotype.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112841
Source
Appetite. 2013 Nov;70:67-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
V. Drapeau
J. Blundell
A R Gallant
H. Arguin
J-P Després
B. Lamarche
A. Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Physical Education, Laval University, Quebec, QC, Canada. vicky.drapeau@fse.ulaval.ca
Source
Appetite. 2013 Nov;70:67-72
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - physiopathology
Appetite - physiology
Body Height
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating - psychology
Humans
Hunger - physiology
Male
Meals
Middle Aged
Obesity - physiopathology
Phenotype
Quebec
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Satiation - physiology
Weight Loss
Abstract
Some individuals report weak appetite sensations and thus, have higher susceptibility to overeating. The aim of this study was (1) to evaluate the reliability of the satiety quotient (SQ), a marker of satiety efficiency; (2) to characterize the biopsychobehavioural profiles of individual presenting low satiety efficiency, i.e. the low satiety phenotype and (3) to document the impact of a weight loss program on these profiles. Sixty-nine obese men (BMI 33.6±3.0 kg/m², age 41.5±5.7 years) participated in a 16-week, non-restrictive weight loss intervention. Visual analog scales for appetite sensations in response to a test-meal were completed twice at baseline. Blood samples were collected before and during one test-meal. Questionnaires were administered before and after the intervention. The mean SQ showed good reliability (ICC=0.67). Baseline SQ scores tended to be negatively correlated with external hunger, anxiety and night eating symptoms (p
PubMed ID
23792908 View in PubMed
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88 records – page 1 of 9.