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6 records – page 1 of 1.

The application of new height-prediction equations (Tanner-Whitehouse mark 2) to a sample of Canadian boys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238845
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 1985 May-Jun;12(3):233-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
N. Cameron
R L Mirwald
D A Bailey
P S Davies
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 1985 May-Jun;12(3):233-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height
Canada
Child
Humans
Male
Mathematics
Probability
Reference Standards
Abstract
The adult statures of a sample of 71 Canadian boys from the Saskatchewan Longitudinal Growth Study were predicted using the original TW Mark 1 and the new TW Mark 2 prediction equations. The subjects had a mean chronological age of 11.59 years (SD = 0.30), a mean RUS bone age of 11.62 'years' (SD = 1.18), a mean height of 145.0 cm (SD = 6.98) and a mean measured adult height of 177.2 cm (SD = 6.65). The Mark 2 equations improved the predictions over Mark 1 by an average of 0.2-0.6 cm and slightly reduced the range of errors. No improvement in the prediction of boys above the 75th centile of British standards was noted but 60-70% of boys below the 25th centile predicted better with the Mark 2 equations. This pattern may well be repeated in more extreme subjects. About 80% of individuals who predicted badly with the Mark 1 equations, i.e. with errors equal to or greater than 5 cm, improved their predictions when Mark 2 equations were used.
PubMed ID
4015033 View in PubMed
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Critical evaluation of frame size determination in the 1983 Metropolitan Life weight for height tables.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230191
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Sep-Oct;80(5):369-72
Publication Type
Article
Author
R A Faulkner
D A Bailey
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Sep-Oct;80(5):369-72
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Body Height
Body Weight
Canada
Elbow - anatomy & histology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness
Reference Values
Skinfold thickness
Somatotypes
Abstract
According to Metropolitan Life, the criteria used in placing individuals into frame size classes on the basis of elbow breadth should result in a 25-50-25% (small-medium-large) distribution. This assumption was evaluated using a large sample of Canadians (n = 19,305). Results indicated that the hypothesized distribution was not achieved in either males or females; few subjects were classified as large frame. The small percentage of subjects classified as large frame resulted in a skewing of the weight categorizations in males, but not in females.
PubMed ID
2804868 View in PubMed
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Relationship of the body mass index with skinfolds, girths, and bone breadths in Canadian men and women aged 20-70 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232393
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1988 Oct;77(2):169-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1988
Author
W D Ross
S M Crawford
D A Kerr
R. Ward
D A Bailey
R M Mirwald
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Applied Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1988 Oct;77(2):169-73
Date
Oct-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body Composition
Body Height
Body Weight
Canada
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Skinfold thickness
Abstract
The relationship of Quetelet index (w/h2), or body mass index (BMI), with the sum of skinfolds at five sites, two skinfold-corrected limb girths, and two bone breadths were studied in a cross-sectional sample of 12,282 men and 6,593 women aged 20-70 years. The correlations of the BMI with skinfolds (0.50), bone breadths (0.51), and girths (0.58) were too low for individual prediction. Contingency tables of the BMI and sum of skinfold categories further indict its use for the purpose of assessing adiposity status or monitoring change in individuals.
PubMed ID
3207166 View in PubMed
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Somatic growth of Canadian children of various ethnic origins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature653
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 1976 May-June; 67(3):209-216.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
A. Demirjian
D A Bailey
D E Pena
F. Auger
M. Jenicek
Author Affiliation
University of Montreal
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 1976 May-June; 67(3):209-216.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Fort Chimo
Igloolik
Growth and development
Bone age
Height
Weight
Adolescent
Body Height
Body Weight
Canada
Child
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Ethnic Groups
Female
Growth
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Male
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1246.
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Timing and magnitude of peak height velocity and peak tissue velocities for early, average, and late maturing boys and girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193965
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2001 Jan-Feb;13(1):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Iuliano-Burns
R L Mirwald
D A Bailey
Author Affiliation
School of Human Movement, Recreation and Performance, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2001 Jan-Feb;13(1):1-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Body Composition - physiology
Body Constitution - physiology
Body Height - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Child
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Nutritional Status
Puberty - physiology
Saskatchewan
Sex Characteristics
Time Factors
Abstract
Height, weight, and tissue accrual were determined in 60 male and 53 female adolescents measured annually over six years using standard anthropometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Annual velocities were derived, and the ages and magnitudes of peak height and peak tissue velocities were determined using a cubic spline fit to individual data. Individuals were rank ordered on the basis of sex and age at peak height velocity (PHV) and then divided into quartiles: early (lowest quartile), average (middle two quartiles), and late (highest quartile) maturers. Sex- and maturity-related comparisons in ages and magnitudes of peak height and peak tissue velocities were made. Males reached peak velocities significantly later than females for all tissues and had significantly greater magnitudes at peak. The age at PHV was negatively correlated with the magnitude of PHV in both sexes. At a similar maturity point (age at PHV) there were no differences in weight or fat mass among maturity groups in both sexes. Late maturing males, however, accrued more bone mineral and lean mass and were taller at the age of PHV compared to early maturers. Thus, maturational status (early, average, or late maturity) as indicated by age at PHV is inversely related to the magnitude of PHV in both sexes. At a similar maturational point there are no differences between early and late maturers for weight and fat mass in boys and girls.
PubMed ID
11466961 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.