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258 records – page 1 of 26.

137Cs concentration among children in areas contaminated with radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident: Mogilev and Gomel Oblasts, Belarus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35314
Source
Health Phys. 1995 May;68(5):733-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
W S Watson
Source
Health Phys. 1995 May;68(5):733-5
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Body Burden
Byelarus
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects - analysis
Child
Humans
Power Plants
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects - analysis
Ukraine
Notes
Comment On: Health Phys. 1994 Sep;67(3):272-58056594
Comment In: Health Phys. 1995 Dec;69(6):9877493819
PubMed ID
7730075 View in PubMed
Less detail

137 Cs: seasonal patterns in native residents of three contrasting Alaskan villages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256245
Source
Health Phys. 1971 Jun;20(6):585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1971

137Cs urinary excretion by northwestern Italians ten years after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72690
Source
Health Phys. 1997 Sep;73(3):498-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
R. Ropolo
P. Cesana
Author Affiliation
Servizio di Fisica Sanitaria, A.O. San Giovanni Battista, Molinette Hospital, Torino, Italy.
Source
Health Phys. 1997 Sep;73(3):498-501
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adult
Body Burden
Cesium Radioisotopes - urine
Female
Food contamination, radioactive
Health Physics
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Radiation Dosage
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
Measurements of 137Cs contamination in the urine of 37 individuals were performed in 1995 and 1996 in order to evaluate the 137Cs daily urinary excretion in the northwestern italian people ten years from the Chernobyl accident. The difference between the average 137Cs daily urinary excretion assessed for 1995 and for 1996 was not statistically significant. Using the values of urine contamination, an estimate of 0.2 Bq(-1) of mean ingested activity was obtained. A mean committed effective dose of about 1 microSv was determined as due to the 137Cs ingestion during 1 y at 10 y after the accident. Such a dose is lower by a factor of 10(3) than the corresponding value for the population of North Italy in the first year following the Chernobyl accident.
PubMed ID
9287092 View in PubMed
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Absorption of polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans by breast-fed infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59296
Source
Chemosphere. 1995 Jun;30(12):2297-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
P. Dahl
G. Lindström
K. Wiberg
C. Rappe
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Chemistry, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Chemosphere. 1995 Jun;30(12):2297-306
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Benzofurans - metabolism
Body Burden
Breast Feeding
Comparative Study
Feces - chemistry
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mass Fragmentography
Milk, human - chemistry
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Abstract
The absorption of polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans was studied in four breast-fed infants. The absorption was measured by comparing the estimated total intake and the excretion in faeces, during 48 hours, at three different time points; 1, 2 and 3 months post parta. The levels of the analysed compounds in the human milk are typical for Sweden, i.e approximately 20 ppt toxic equivalents for the dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and for the polychlorinated biphenyls approximately 16 ppt toxic equivalents. For most of the congeners the absorption is found to be over 95%. Higher excretion is noticed for heptachlorinated and octachlorinated dioxins.
PubMed ID
7620852 View in PubMed
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Accumulated body burden and endogenous release of lead in employees of a lead smelter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209372
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Feb;105(2):224-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
D E Fleming
D. Boulay
N S Richard
J P Robin
C L Gordon
C E Webber
D R Chettle
Author Affiliation
Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Feb;105(2):224-33
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body Burden
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Calcaneus - chemistry
Canada
Female
Humans
Lead - analysis - blood
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Occupational Exposure
Tibia - chemistry
Abstract
Bone lead levels for 367 active and 14 retired lead smelter workers were measured in vivo by X-ray fluorescence in May-June 1994. The bone sites of study were the tibia and calcaneus; magnitudes of concentration were used to gauge lead body burden. Whole blood lead readings from the workers generated a cumulative blood lead index (CBLI) that approximated the level of lead exposure over time. Blood lead values for 204 of the 381 workers were gathered from workers returning from a 10-month work interruption that ended in 1991; their blood level values were compared to their tibia and calcaneus lead levels. The resulting relations allowed constraints to be placed on the endogenous release of lead from bone in smelter works. Calcaneus lead levels were found to correlate strongly with those for tibia lead, and in a manner consistent with observations from other lead industry workers. Relations between bone lead concentration and CBLI demonstrated a distinctly nonlinear appearance. When the active population was divided by date of hire, a significant difference in the bone lead-CBLI slope emerged. After a correction to include the component of CBLI existing before the workers' employment at the smelter was made, this difference persisted. This implies that the transfer of lead from blood to bone in the workers has changed over time, possibly as a consequence of varying exposure conditions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
9105798 View in PubMed
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Accumulation features and temporal trends of PCDDs, PCDFs and PCBs in Baikal seals (Pusa sibirica).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90631
Source
Environ Pollut. 2009 Mar;157(3):737-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Imaeda Daisuke
Kunisue Tatsuya
Ochi Yoko
Iwata Hisato
Tsydenova Oyuna
Takahashi Shin
Amano Masao
Petrov Evgeny A
Batoev Valeriy B
Tanabe Shinsuke
Author Affiliation
Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577, Japan.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2009 Mar;157(3):737-47
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry - metabolism
Animals
Body Burden
Ecotoxicology - methods
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Female
Fresh Water
Male
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Seals, Earless - metabolism
Siberia
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - analogs & derivatives - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Time Factors
Abstract
This study investigated the accumulation features and temporal trends of PCDD/Fs, dioxin-like PCBs (DL-PCBs) and non-dioxin-like PCBs (NDL-PCBs) in the blubber of Baikal seals collected in 1992 and 2005. DL-PCBs (480-3600ng/g) and NDL-PCBs (980-35,000ng/g) were dominant contaminants. Concentrations of PCDDs and PCBs in males were significantly higher than in females. In males, age-dependent accumulation was observed for PCDDs, mono-ortho PCBs and NDL-PCBs. PCDFs and non-ortho PCBs showed no such trends, implying that exposure of seals to these contaminants has been decreasing in recent years. No decreasing temporal trend was observed for PCDDs, mono-ortho PCBs and NDL-PCBs, suggesting that Baikal seals are still exposed to PCDDs and PCBs. TEQs of PCDDs and mono-ortho PCBs in seals collected in 2005 accounted for 62-77% of total TEQs. The TEQ levels in 40% of the specimens exceeded the threshold level for immunosuppression observed in harbor seals (209pg/g).
PubMed ID
19110354 View in PubMed
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Activation of the immune system and systemic immune-complex deposits in Brown Norway rats with dental amalgam restorations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72544
Source
J Dent Res. 1998 Jun;77(6):1415-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
P. Hultman
U. Lindh
P. Hörsted-Bindslev
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Environment, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
J Dent Res. 1998 Jun;77(6):1415-25
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Antibody Formation - drug effects
Antigen-Antibody Complex - analysis - blood
Autoimmune Diseases - chemically induced
Autoimmunity
Body Burden
Comparative Study
Copper - analysis
Dental Amalgam - toxicity
Dinitrobenzenes
Female
Immune Complex Diseases - chemically induced
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Laminin
Lymphocyte Activation - drug effects
Mercury - analysis - blood - pharmacokinetics
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Silver - analysis
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Statistics, nonparametric
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
Dental amalgam restorations are a significant source of mercury exposure in the human population, but their potential to cause systemic health effects is highly disputed. We examined effects on the immune system by giving genetically mercury-susceptible Brown Norway (BN) rats and mercury-resistant Lewis (LE) rats silver amalgam restorations in 4 molars of the upper jaw, causing a body burden similar to that described in human amalgam-bearers (from 250 to 375 mg amalgam/kg body weight). BN rats with amalgam restorations, compared with control rats given composite resinous restorations, developed a rapid activation of the immune system, with a maximum 12-fold increase of the plasma IgE concentration after 3 wks (p 0.05). After 12 wks, BN rats with amalgam restorations showed significantly increased (p spleen > cerebrum occipital lobe > cerebellum > liver > thymus, and the tissue silver concentration was significantly (p
PubMed ID
9649170 View in PubMed
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Activity concentrations of 226Ra and 228Ra in drilled well water in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168789
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2006;121(4):406-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
P. Vesterbacka
T. Turtiainen
S. Heinävaara
H. Arvela
Author Affiliation
STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, PO Box 14, 00881 Helsinki, Finland. pia.vesterbacka@stuk.fi
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2006;121(4):406-12
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Background Radiation
Body Burden
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Finland
Humans
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radiation Protection - methods
Radon - analysis
Relative Biological Effectiveness
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
The activity concentrations of (226)Ra and (228)Ra in drinking water were determined in water samples from 176 drilled wells. (226)Ra activity concentrations were in the range of
PubMed ID
16777909 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age and seasonal variability of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in free-ranging East Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80128
Source
Environ Pollut. 2007 Mar;146(1):166-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Dietz Rune
Rigét Frank F
Sonne Christian
Letcher Robert J
Backus Sean
Born Erik W
Kirkegaard Maja
Muir Derek C G
Author Affiliation
Department of Arctic Environment, National Environmental Research Institute, Frederiksborgvej 399, P.O. Box 358, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark. rdi@dmu.dk
Source
Environ Pollut. 2007 Mar;146(1):166-73
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Aging - physiology
Animals
Body Burden
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Female
Flame Retardants - analysis
Food chain
Greenland
Male
Polybrominated Biphenyls - analysis
Seasons
Ursidae - physiology
Abstract
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were analysed in adipose tissue from 92 East Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus) sampled during 1999-2001. Mean SigmaPBDE concentrations were 70 ng/g lipid weight (lw) (range: 22-192 ng/g lw) and showed no relationship with age or sex. Of the 32 analysed PBDE congeners; BDE47, BDE153, BDE99 and BDE100 dominated, and comprised 99.6% of the SigmaPBDE concentration. The SigmaPBDE concentration had a highly significant correlation with SigmaPCB, SigmaCHL, dieldrin, HCB and SigmaHCH concentrations. We found a seasonal pattern of median SigmaPBDE concentration with 1.2 to 1.8 times higher concentrations in March to July than the rest of the year. The seasonal variation also provides a clue to the seasonal exposure, bio-availability, toxic exposure and degradation. We suggest that future geographical PBDE data comparisons may not need corrections for sex or age, but such data sets should be corrected for seasonal variability, using the presented correctional trigonometric regression.
PubMed ID
17055135 View in PubMed
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258 records – page 1 of 26.