Skip header and navigation

Refine By

3060 records – page 1 of 306.

1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273208
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Elizaveta Chabanova
Ehm Astrid Andersson
Johanne Dam Ohrt
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Henrik S Thomsen
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood
Fatty Liver - pathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Male
Muscles - pathology
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - blood - pathology
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Puberty
Sex Factors
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Abstract
This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children.
Fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years.
In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences of hepatic and muscular steatosis were 31% and 68%, respectively, whereas the prevalences in 40 lean children were 3% and 10%, respectively. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index z-score (BMI SDS), and pubertal development showed that the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 4.2 (95%CI: [1.8; 10.2], p = 0.0009) when hepatic steatosis was present. Comparing the simultaneous presence of hepatic and muscular steatosis with no presence of steatosis, the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 5.8 (95%CI: [2.0; 18.6], p = 0.002). No significant associations between muscle fat and dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, or blood pressure were observed. Liver and muscle fat, adjusted for age, sex, BMI SDS, and pubertal development, associated to BMI SDS and glycosylated hemoglobin, while only liver fat associated to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipid associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased cardiovascular disease risk.
Notes
Cites: Child Obes. 2012 Dec;8(6):533-4123181919
Cites: Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Aug;6(3-4):188-9621529264
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2014 Jan;38(1):40-523828099
Cites: Pediatr Diabetes. 2014 May;15(3):151-6124754463
Cites: Semin Liver Dis. 2001;21(1):3-1611296695
Cites: Pediatr Clin North Am. 2011 Dec;58(6):1375-92, x22093857
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Feb;20(2):371-521869763
Cites: AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2012 Jul;199(1):2-722733887
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Jul;97(7):E1099-10522508709
Cites: Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2009 Feb;19(2):146-5219171470
Cites: Pediatr Diabetes. 2014 Sep;15 Suppl 20:4-1725182305
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 Feb;25(2):177-8411410817
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2001 Dec;86(12):5755-6111739435
Cites: Diabetes. 2002 Apr;51(4):1022-711916921
Cites: Circulation. 2003 Mar 25;107(11):1562-612654618
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Sep 20;362(9388):951-714511928
Cites: Pediatrics. 2004 Aug;114(2 Suppl 4th Report):555-7615286277
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Oct;28(10):1257-6315278103
Cites: Nutr Rev. 1981 Feb;39(2):43-557010232
Cites: Stat Med. 1992 Jul;11(10):1305-191518992
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 Oct;58(4):463-78379501
Cites: Diabetes. 1997 Jun;46(6):983-89166669
Cites: Diabetologia. 1999 Jan;42(1):113-610027589
Cites: Diabetes. 1999 Oct;48(10):2039-4410512371
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 Mar;14(3):357-6716648604
Cites: Pediatrics. 2006 Oct;118(4):1388-9317015527
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2007 Jan;30(1):89-9417192339
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jul;61(7):877-8317151586
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Jul 15;118(3):277-8318591439
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2009 Feb;32(2):342-718957533
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Sep;94(9):3440-719531593
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Jun 1;171(11):1195-20220457571
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2010 Sep;163(3):413-920584996
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Dec;95(12):5189-9820829185
Cites: J Clin Res Pediatr Endocrinol. 2010;2(3):100-621274322
Cites: Diabetologia. 2011 Apr;54(4):869-7521181394
Cites: Abdom Imaging. 2013 Apr;38(2):315-922736224
PubMed ID
26252778 View in PubMed
Less detail

ß2 -adrenergic receptor Thr164IIe polymorphism, blood pressure and ischaemic heart disease in 66?750 individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131722
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Mar;271(3):305-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
M. Thomsen
M. Dahl
A. Tybjaerg-Hansen
B G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Mar;271(3):305-14
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Pressure - genetics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Hypertension - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle, Skeletal
Myocardial Ischemia - genetics
Myocytes, Smooth Muscle
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 - genetics
Sex Factors
Abstract
The ß(2) -adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) is located on smooth muscle cells and is an important regulator of smooth muscle tone. The Thr164Ile polymorphism (rs1800888) in the ADRB2 gene is rare but has profound functional consequences on receptor function and could cause lifelong elevated smooth muscle tone. We tested the hypothesis that Thr164Ile is associated with increased blood pressure, increased frequency of hypertension and increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD).
A total of 66 750 individuals from two large Danish general population studies were genotyped, and 1943 Thr164Ile heterozygotes and 16 homozygotes were identified.
Thr164Ile genotype was associated with increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure in women (trend: P = 0.04 and 0.02): systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased by 5% and 2%, respectively, in female homozygotes compared with female noncarriers. All female Thr164Ile homozygotes had hypertension compared with 58% of female heterozygotes and 54% of female noncarriers (chi-square: P = 0.001). Female Thr164Ile homozygotes and heterozygotes had odds ratios for ischaemic heart disease (IHD) of 2.93 (0.56-15.5) and 1.28 (1.03-1.61), respectively, compared with female noncarriers (trend: P = 0.007). These differences were not observed in men. Furthermore, Gly16Arg (rs1042713) and Gln27Glu (rs1042714) in the ADRB2 gene were not associated with blood pressure, hypertension or CVD either in the population overall or in women and men separately.
ADRB2 Thr164Ile is associated with increased blood pressure, increased frequency of hypertension and increased risk of IHD amongst women in the general population. These findings, particularly for homozygotes, are novel.
PubMed ID
21883537 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 5-year follow-up study of disease incidence in men with an abnormal hormone pattern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47352
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Oct;254(4):386-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
R. Rosmond
S. Wallerius
P. Wanger
L. Martin
G. Holm
P. Björntorp
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Institute, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Oct;254(4):386-90
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - epidemiology - metabolism
Biological Markers - blood
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism
Cerebrovascular Accident - epidemiology - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - metabolism
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose - analysis
Humans
Hydrocortisone - analysis
Hypertension - epidemiology - metabolism
Incidence
Insulin - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have suggested that abnormal levels of cortisol and testosterone might increase the risk of serious somatic diseases. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a 5-year follow-up study in middle-aged men. METHODS: A population-based cohort study conducted in 1995 amongst 141 Swedish men born in 1944, in whom a clinical examination supplemented by medical history aimed to disclose the presence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) (myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, stroke), type 2 diabetes and hypertension were performed at baseline and at follow-up in the year 2000. In addition, salivary cortisol levels were measured repeatedly over the day. Serum testosterone concentrations were also determined. Using the baseline data, an algorithm was constructed, which classified the secretion pattern of cortisol and testosterone from each individual as being normal or abnormal. RESULTS: By the end of follow-up, men with an abnormal hormone secretion pattern (n = 73) had elevated mean arterial pressure (P = 0.003), fasting insulin (P = 0.009) and insulin : glucose ratio (P = 0.005) compared with men with a normal secretion pattern (n = 68). Body mass index, waist circumference, and waist : hip ratio were significantly elevated in both groups. However, the 5-year incidence of CVD, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension were significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
12974877 View in PubMed
Less detail

7-year stability of blood pressure in the Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197147
Source
Prev Med. 2000 Oct;31(4):403-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
P T Katzmarzyk
T. Rankinen
L. Pérusse
R M Malina
C. Bouchard
Author Affiliation
Department of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, North York, Ontario, Canada M3J IP3. katzmarz@yorku.ca
Source
Prev Med. 2000 Oct;31(4):403-9
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aging - physiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to examine the 7-year stability of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures in the Canadian population.
The sample included 1,503 participants 7-69 years of age from the 1981 Canada Fitness Survey who were remeasured in Campbell's Survey of 1988. Both SBP and DBP were adjusted for the effects of body mass index (BMI) using regression procedures.
Interage correlations from baseline to follow-up ranged from -0.17 to 0.61 for SBP and from -0.22 to 0. 51 for DBP. With few exceptions, correlations were positive and significant, and were highest and most consistent in adulthood. Further, between 27 and 39% of participants in the upper or lower quintiles in 1981 remained there in 1988. There were few differences in adiposity between those who remained in the upper or lower quintiles and those who did not. One exception was that males who remained in the upper quintile of SBP had greater values for BMI, sum of skinfolds, and waist circumference at baseline. Among adults, the best predictor of future blood pressure was baseline blood pressure, which accounted for between 12 and 34% of the variance in follow-up blood pressure, followed by age, follow-up BMI, and, in females, baseline physical activity levels.
Blood pressure demonstrated low to moderate stability over 7 years in Canada, and baseline level of adiposity was related to the stability of SBP in males.
PubMed ID
11006066 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 16-year incidence, progression and regression of diabetic retinopathy in a young population-based Danish cohort with type 1 diabetes mellitus: The Danish cohort of pediatric diabetes 1987 (DCPD1987).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259744
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2014;51(3):413-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Rebecca Broe
Malin Lundberg Rasmussen
Ulrik Frydkjaer-Olsen
Birthe Susanne Olsen
Henrik Bindesboel Mortensen
Tunde Peto
Jakob Grauslund
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2014;51(3):413-20
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood pressure
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - metabolism
Diabetic Retinopathy - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism - pathology
Disease Progression
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Male
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the long-term incidence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), and progression and regression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and associated risk factors in young Danish patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. In 1987-89, a pediatric cohort involving approximately 75 % of all children with Type 1 diabetes in Denmark
PubMed ID
24193810 View in PubMed
Less detail

20 years or more of follow-up of living kidney donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222923
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1992
Author
J S Najarian
B M Chavers
L E McHugh
A J Matas
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455.
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Date
Oct-3-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - urine
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Creatinine - blood - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Kidney - physiology
Kidney Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Proteinuria - etiology
Pulmonary Embolism - mortality
Tissue Donors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The perioperative and long-term risks for living kidney donors are of concern. We have studied donors at the University of Minnesota 20 years or more (mean 23.7) after donation by comparing renal function, blood pressure, and proteinuria in donors with siblings. In 57 donors (mean age 61 [SE 1]), mean serum creatinine is 1.1 (0.01) mg/dl, blood urea nitrogen 17 (0.5) mg/dl, creatinine clearance 82 (2) ml/min, and blood pressure 134 (2)/80 (1) mm Hg. 32% of the donors are taking antihypertensive drugs and 23% have proteinuria. The 65 siblings (mean age 58 [1.3]) do not significantly differ from the donors in any of these variables: 1.1 (0.03) mg/dl, 17 (1.2) mg/dl, 89 (3.3) ml/min, and 130 (3)/80 (1.5) mm Hg, respectively. 44% of the siblings are taking antihypertensives and 22% have proteinuria. To assess perioperative mortality, we surveyed all members of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons about donor mortality at their institutions. We documented 17 perioperative deaths in the USA and Canada after living donation, and estimate mortality to be 0.03%. We conclude that perioperative mortality in the USA and Canada after living-donor nephrectomy is low. In long-term follow-up of our living donors, we found no evidence of progressive renal deterioration or other serious disorders.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1992 Nov 28;340(8831):1354-51360068
PubMed ID
1357243 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 21-year follow-up of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study: risk factor levels, secular trends and east-west difference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180902
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Apr;255(4):457-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
M. Juonala
J S A Viikari
N. Hutri-Kähönen
M. Pietikäinen
E. Jokinen
L. Taittonen
J. Marniemi
T. Rönnemaa
O T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
The Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Apr;255(4):457-68
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Patient Dropouts
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study is an on-going multicentre study of atherosclerosis precursors in Finnish children and young adults. We have collected risk factor data in the 21-year follow-up performed in 2001. The aims of this analysis were to examine the levels, secular trends and east-west difference in risk factors amongst young adults.
Population based follow-up study.
A total of 2283 participants aged 24-39 years in 2001 (63.5% of the original cohort).
Levels of serum lipids, apolipoproteins, blood pressure and smoking.
The mean serum total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in 24-39-year-old adults were 5.16, 3.27, 1.29 and 1.34 mmol L(-1), respectively. Total cholesterol (5.21 vs. 5.12 mmol L(-1), P = 0.046), HDL cholesterol (1.31 vs. 1.28 mmol L(-1), P = 0.027), systolic blood pressure (118 vs. 115 mmHg, P
PubMed ID
15049880 View in PubMed
Less detail

21 year trends in incidence of myocardial infarction and mortality from coronary disease in middle-age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210947
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1495-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
P. Immonen-Räihä
M. Arstila
J. Tuomilehto
M. Haikio
A. Mononen
T. Vuorenmaa
J. Torppa
I. Parvinen
Author Affiliation
Health Office City of Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1495-502
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - prevention & control
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Survival Analysis
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study is to describe the 21 year trends in myocardial infarction among middle-aged inhabitants in the city of Turku, in southwestern Finland. Since 1972 the coronary register in Turku has monitored acute coronary events leading to hospital admission or death, first according to the methods of the World Health Organization Heart Attack Register Study, and since 1982 according to the methods of the WHO MONICA. From 1972 to 1992 we registered 7374 events of suspected myocardial infarction, of which 6045 events occurring in inhabitants of Turku aged 35-64 years, fulfilled the criteria for myocardial infarction. Within 28 days, 2266 coronary events proved fatal. During the 21-year period, the incidence of definite myocardial infarction fell by 55% in men and by 62% in women, and coronary mortality fell by 66 and 81%, respectively. From 1972 to 1982, total mortality and coronary mortality decreased in parallel. Later on, the decrease in total mortality levelled off, even though coronary mortality fell still steeper, because mortality from external causes of death increased. The favourable long-term trends reflect favourable changes in total cholesterol and blood pressure in the middle-aged population, and the improvement in the treatment of myocardial infarction. Further efforts are needed to enhance this trend, but also to reduce total mortality among middle-aged people.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1455-68909894
PubMed ID
8909905 View in PubMed
Less detail

24-h ambulatory blood pressure is linked to chromosome 18q21-22 and genetic variation of NEDD4L associates with cross-sectional and longitudinal blood pressure in Swedes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81774
Source
Kidney Int. 2006 Aug;70(3):562-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Fava C.
von Wowern F.
Berglund G.
Carlson J.
Hedblad B.
Rosberg L.
Burri P.
Almgren P.
Melander O.
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, University Hospital MAS, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Kidney Int. 2006 Aug;70(3):562-9
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alternative Splicing
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - genetics
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18
Circadian Rhythm
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - genetics
Insulin - blood
Linkage (Genetics)
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases - genetics
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
Numerous linkage studies have indicated chromosome 18q21-22 as a locus of importance for blood pressure regulation. This locus harbors the neural precursor cell expressed developmentally downregulated 4-like (NEDD4L) gene, which is instrumental for the regulation of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). In a linkage study of 16 markers (including two single nucleotide polymorphism markers located within the NEDD4L gene) on chromosome 18 between 70-104 cM and ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), in 118 families, the strongest evidence of linkage was found for 24 h and day-time systolic ABP at the NEDD4L locus (82.25 cM) (P=0.0014). In a large population sample (n=4001), we subsequently showed that a NEDD4L gene variant (rs4149601), which by alternative splicing leads to varying expression of a functionally crucial C2 domain, was associated with diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (P=0.03) and DBP progression over time (P=0.04). A genotype combination of the rs4149601 and an intronic NEDD4L marker (rs2288774) was associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) (P=0.01), DBP (P=0.04), and progression of both SBP (P=0.03) and DBP (P=0.05) over time. A quantitative transmission disequilibrium test in the family material of the rs4149601 supported this NEDD4L variant as being at least partially causative of the linkage result. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the chromosome 18 linkage peak at 82.25 cM is explained by genetic NEDD4L variation affecting cross-sectional and longitudinal blood pressure, possibly as a consequence of altered NEDD4L interaction with ENaC.
PubMed ID
16788695 View in PubMed
Less detail

3060 records – page 1 of 306.