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Abnormal glucose regulation in patients with acute ST- elevation myocardial infarction-a cohort study on 224 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90209
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2009;8:6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Knudsen Eva C
Seljeflot Ingebjørg
Abdelnoor Michael
Eritsland Jan
Mangschau Arild
Arnesen Harald
Andersen Geir O
Author Affiliation
Center for Clinical Heart Research, Ullevål University Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. evacecilie.knudsen@ulleval.no
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2009;8:6
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diagnostic Tests, Routine
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Intolerance - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Unnecessary Procedures
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A high prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance and unknown type 2-diabetes in patients with coronary heart disease and no previous diagnosis of diabetes have been reported. The aims of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of abnormal glucose regulation (AGR) 3 months after an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients without known glucometabolic disturbance, to evaluate the reliability of a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) performed very early after an acute STEMI to predict the presence of AGR at 3 months, and to study other potential predictors measured in-hospital for AGR at 3 months. METHODS: This was an observational cohort study prospectively enrolling 224 STEMI patients treated with primary PCI. An OGTT was performed very early after an acute STEMI and was repeated in 200 patients after 3 months. We summarised the exact agreement observed, and assessed the observed reproducibility of the OGTTs performed in-hospital and at follow up. The patients were classified into glucometabolic categories defined according to the World Health Organisation criteria. AGR was defined as the sum of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2-diabetes. RESULTS: The prevalence of AGR at three months was 24.9% (95% CI 19.1, 31.4%), reduced from 46.9% (95% CI 40.2, 53.6) when measured in-hospital. Only, 108 of 201 (54%) patients remained in the same glucometabolic category after a repeated OGTT. High levels of HbA1c and admission plasma glucose in-hospital significantly predicted AGR at 3 months (p
PubMed ID
19183453 View in PubMed
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Acarbose for the treatment of type II diabetes: the results of a Canadian multi-centre trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214600
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1995 Aug;28 Suppl:S167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
R G Josse
Author Affiliation
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1995 Aug;28 Suppl:S167-72
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acarbose
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Canada
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Diabetic diet
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Metformin - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Placebos
Sulfonylurea Compounds - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Trisaccharides - therapeutic use
Abstract
The treatment of Type II diabetes (NIDDM) includes an appropriate diet and prudent exercise program. If these measures are insufficient to control the blood sugar, oral agents (sulphonylureas or biguanides) or insulin are added to the therapeutic regimen. Although the diet prescription has undergone some changes and refinements, this approach has been the traditional treatment for NIDDM for nearly 40 years. Recently a new class of oral agents, the alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, has become available. These drugs are competitive inhibitors of the alpha-glucosidase enzymes in the brush border of the bowel wall. They act to slow and delay the rate of carbohydrate absorption, thereby decreasing postprandial hyperglycemia. A recent study was designed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of acarbose, an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, in improving the glycemic control of patients with NIDDM who were sub-optimally controlled on either diet alone, or diet plus sulphonylurea, metformin or insulin. A total of 354 patients with NIDDM were studied, 77 on diet alone, 83 on metformin, 103 and sulphonylurea and 91 on insulin. Subjects in each treatment stratum were randomized, double-blind to either acarbose or placebo, for 1 year. At baseline and every 3 months thereafter, fasting and postprandial glucose and C-peptide, HbA1c and fasting lipids were measured. Compared to placebo, acarbose treatment resulted in a decrease in mean postprandial glucose in all four strata (19 +/- 0.8 to 15.3 +/- 0.7 mmol/l: P
Notes
Erratum In: Diabetes Res Clin Pract 1995 Sep;29(3):215
PubMed ID
8529510 View in PubMed
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Acoustic-reflex responses in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48476
Source
Am J Otolaryngol. 1994 Mar-Apr;15(2):109-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Virtaniemi
M. Laakso
J. Nuutinen
S. Karjalainen
E. Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Am J Otolaryngol. 1994 Mar-Apr;15(2):109-13
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Impedance Tests
Adult
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Autonomic Nervous System - physiology
Autonomic Nervous System Diseases - physiopathology
Blood Glucose - analysis
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - drug therapy - metabolism - physiopathology
Diabetic Angiopathies - physiopathology
Diabetic Neuropathies - physiopathology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem - physiology
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Male
Reaction Time - physiology
Reflex, Acoustic - physiology
Reflex, Stretch - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) are especially susceptible to microangiopathic complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Microangiopathic changes are also the most important findings in histopathologic studies of the inner ear and central nervous systems in diabetic subjects. No previous studies have measured acoustic-reflex latencies (ARL) or amplitudes (ARA) in patients with IDDM. ARL and ARA reflect the function of the acoustic-reflex arch. Furthermore, possible changes in the tympanic membrane, ossicular chain, and stapedius muscle may affect the shape of acoustic-reflex. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Acoustic-reflex thresholds, latencies, and amplitudes were studied in 53 patients with IDDM and 42 randomly selected nondiabetic control subjects, aged between 20 and 40 years, using the Madsen Model ZO 73 Impedance Bridge (Madsen Electronics, Copenhagen, Denmark). Subjects with an abnormal tympanic membrane, conductive hearing loss, and known cause for hearing impairment eg, noise damage, were excluded from the study. RESULTS: There were no differences between control and diabetic subjects in the contralateral acoustic-reflex thresholds. In contrast, patients with IDDM had longer ARLs and decreased ARAs compared with those of control subjects. ARA amplitude had linear correlation with the amplitude of tympanogram, whereas ARL had no linear correlation with auditory brainstem latencies in the same study subjects. Acoustic-reflex responses in insulin-dependent diabetic patients were not associated with the duration of diabetes, metabolic control, microangiopathy, or neuropathy. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged ARLs and decreased ARAs in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes are probably caused more by the stiff middle ear system than disturbances in the brainstem.
PubMed ID
8179101 View in PubMed
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Analytical performance specifications based on how clinicians use laboratory tests. Experiences from a post-analytical external quality assessment programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270020
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2015 May;53(6):857-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Geir Thue
Sverre Sandberg
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2015 May;53(6):857-62
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood Sedimentation
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - standards
Creatinine - blood - urine
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
International Normalized Ratio
Norway
Quality Control
Reference Values
Serum Albumin - analysis
Abstract
Analytical performance specifications can be based on three different models: the effect of analytical performance on clinical outcome, based on components of biological variation of the measurand or based on state-of-the-art. Models 1 and 3 may to some degree be combined by using case histories presented to a large number of clinicians. The Norwegian Quality Improvement of Primary Care Laboratories (Noklus) has integrated vignettes in its external quality assessment programme since 1991, focusing on typical clinical situations in primary care. Haemoglobin, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), HbA1c, glucose, u-albumin, creatinine/estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and Internationl Normalised Ratio (INR) have been evaluated focusing on critical differences in test results, i.e., a change from a previous result that will generate an "action" such as a change in treatment or follow-up of the patient. These critical differences, stated by physicians, can translate into reference change values (RCVs) and assumed analytical performance can be calculated. In general, assessments of RCVs and therefore performance specifications vary both within and between groups of doctors, but with no or minor differences regarding specialisation, age or sex of the general practitioner. In some instances state-of-the-art analytical performance could not meet clinical demands using 95% confidence, whereas clinical demands were met using 80% confidence in nearly all instances. RCVs from vignettes should probably not be used on their own as a basis for setting analytical performance specifications, since clinicians seem "uninformed" regarding important principles. They could rather be used as a background for focus groups of "informed" physicians in discussions of performance specifications tailored to "typical" clinical situations.
PubMed ID
25883204 View in PubMed
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Antihyperglycaemic treatment of type 2 diabetes: results from a national diabetes register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163570
Source
Diabetes Metab. 2007 Sep;33(4):269-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
B. Eliasson
K. Eeg-Olofsson
J. Cederholm
P M Nilsson
S. Gudbjörnsdóttir
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE-413 45 Göteborg, Sweden. bjorn.eliasson@gu.se
Source
Diabetes Metab. 2007 Sep;33(4):269-76
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body mass index
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Diabetic Angiopathies - prevention & control
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Lipids - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To describe clinical characteristics and antihyperglycemic treatment patterns in patients with varying duration of diabetes.
We performed a cross-sectional survey of 61890 type 2 diabetic (DM2) patients from the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR) in 2004. We also analysed the effect of types of treatment and risk factors on glycaemic control in a longitudinal cohort study from 1996 to 2004. HbA(1c), risk factors and treatments were determined locally in primary care as well as hospital outpatient clinics.
Insulin was frequently used in DM2 patients with long duration of diabetes, although the mean HbA(1c) increased and only a few in this group reached HbA(1c) 1%) from 1996 to 2004 were more often treated with insulin than with oral hypoglycaemic agents (OHA). During this period, the HbA(1c) levels leading to additional treatment decreased. A low BMI, decreasing BMI and not smoking were predictors of good long-term metabolic control. Hypertension and hyperlipidaemia were frequent in both newly diagnosed DM2 patients and in patients with a long duration of diabetes.
Insulin treatment was frequently used, particularly in patients with a long duration of DM2. The glycaemic control, which usually deteriorates over time, did not reach the recommended goal, despite the fact that complementary treatment was added at lower HbA(1c) levels in 2003 than in 1996. High frequencies of hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and high 10-year risks of coronary heart disease necessitate intensified risk factor control in the future.
PubMed ID
17499541 View in PubMed
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Assessment of Traub formula and ketone bodies in cause of death investigations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106879
Source
Int J Legal Med. 2013 Nov;127(6):1131-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Terhi Keltanen
Antti Sajantila
Jukka U Palo
Teija Partanen
Tiina Valonen
Katarina Lindroos
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Forensic Biology, Department of Forensic Medicine, Hjelt Institute, PO Box 40, FI-00014, University of Helsinki, Finland, terhi.keltanen@helsinki.fi.
Source
Int J Legal Med. 2013 Nov;127(6):1131-7
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3-Hydroxybutyric Acid - blood
Acetoacetates - blood
Acetone - blood
Alcoholism - blood - pathology
Algorithms
Autopsy
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cause of Death
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - pathology
Diabetic Ketoacidosis - blood - pathology
Diagnosis, Differential
Finland
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Hyperglycemia - blood - pathology
Ketone Bodies - blood
Lactic Acid - blood
Postmortem Changes
Predictive value of tests
Abstract
Diabetes and alcohol abuse may cause severe metabolic disturbances that can be fatal. These may be difficult to diagnose in autopsies based solely on macroscopical and histological findings. In such cases, metabolic markers, such as postmortem glucose and ketone levels, can provide supporting information. Glucose or combined glucose and lactate, the Traub value, is often used to indicate hyperglycemia. The use of the Traub value, however, has been questioned by some, because the lactate levels are known to elevate in postmortem samples also due to other reasons than glycolysis of glucose molecules. Ketoacidosis can be detected by analyzing ketone body levels, especially beta-hydroxybutyric acid (BHB). Acetone is also elevated in severe cases of ketoacidosis. Here, we have evaluated the value of these biomarkers for postmortem determination of the metabolic disturbances. Retrospective data of 980 medico-legal autopsies performed in Finland, where glucose, lactate and ketone bodies were analyzed, was collected. Our findings show that the Traub value indicates hyperglycemia, even when glucose levels are low. For diagnosis, evaluation of complementing markers, e.g. ketone bodies and glycated hemoglobin is needed. Our results show that BHB can be used for screening and diagnosis of ketoacidosis. Acetone alone is not sufficient, since it is elevated only in the most severe cases. We also found that alcohol abuse rarely causes severe ketoacidosis. However, sporadic cases do exist where ketone body levels are extremely high. Despite this, alcoholic ketoacidosis is very rarely diagnosed as the cause of death.
PubMed ID
24091723 View in PubMed
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Association between stimulated plasma C-peptide and age: the Wadena City Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73500
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992 Apr;40(4):309-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
L R French
F C Goetz
A M Martinez
J R Boen
S A Bushhouse
J M Sprafka
Author Affiliation
Chronic Disease and Environmental Epidemiology Section, Minnesota Department of Health.
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992 Apr;40(4):309-15
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - blood - metabolism - urine
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body mass index
C-Peptide - blood - urine
Cholesterol - blood
Creatinine - blood - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating - physiology
Fasting
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - blood
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Least-Squares Analysis
Linear Models
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Minnesota
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sex Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess age-related changes in stimulated plasma C-peptide in a population-based sample of adults. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Wadena, Minnesota, a city of 4,699 residents (1980 census) in west central Minnesota, approximately 150 miles from Minneapolis/St. Paul. STUDY SUBJECTS: 344 non-diabetic subjects (NDDG standards) from a stratified random sample of the total adult population of Wadena, MN. The six-study strata were men and women from three age groups: young, 20-39 years of age; middle-aged, 40-59; and older, greater than 60 years of age. MEASUREMENTS: During a liquid meal of Ensure-Plus (Ensure-Plus challenge test; EPCT; Ross Laboratories), blood samples were taken for glucose, free fatty acids, creatinine, and C-peptide. Plasma C-peptide taken 90 minutes after the EPCT was used as a surrogate measure for insulin. Clinical tests included one-time samples for hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and lipoproteins. Physical measurements included height, weight, and blood pressure. Urine was assayed for C-peptide and creatinine. Assays of urine and plasma C-peptide used antibody M1221 (from Novo; Copenhagen, Denmark). MAIN RESULTS: No differences were observed for the relationship between age and C-peptide within each of the three age groups for men and the three age groups for women. However, the levels of plasma C-peptide for older men or women were statistically significantly higher than levels for the young age groups of the same sex; fasting plasma glucose also was higher for older groups of both sexes, and postmeal glucose was significantly higher for older women. There were decreases with age in urine C-peptide clearance for women and men; the decline for women was statistically significant. In multiple regression models for men alone and women alone, that controlled for age, post-meal plasma glucose best explained plasma C-peptide levels. For young men, plasma glucose alone provided the best prediction of plasma C-peptide levels; body mass index (BMI) and plasma glucose provided the best prediction for young women. For older men and both middle-aged and older women, a combination of urine C-peptide clearance and plasma glucose best predicted plasma C-peptide levels; for middle-aged men, BMI also contributed to the prediction. CONCLUSIONS: Secretion of insulin in response to an orally administered mixed meal is undiminished with age in non-diabetic adults.
PubMed ID
1556356 View in PubMed
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Carbohydrate counting accuracy and blood glucose variability in adults with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119041
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2013 Jan;99(1):19-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
A S Brazeau
H. Mircescu
K. Desjardins
C. Leroux
I. Strychar
J M Ekoé
R. Rabasa-Lhoret
Author Affiliation
Montreal Institute for Clinical Research (IRCM), Montreal, QC, Canada. anne-sophie.brazeau@ircm.qc.ca
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2013 Jan;99(1):19-23
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - analysis
Combined Modality Therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diet therapy - drug therapy
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Hyperglycemia - prevention & control
Hypoglycemia - prevention & control
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Ambulatory
Patient compliance
Patient Education as Topic
Quebec
Abstract
Carbohydrate counting is an established approach used by patients with type 1 diabetes to improve their glycemic control. The aims of this study were to evaluate, in real life conditions, the accuracy of meal carbohydrate estimate and its impact on glycemic variability.
In this cross-sectional study, we observed the ability of 50 adults (48% women) with type 1 diabetes (age: 42.7±11.1 years); diabetes duration: 21.4±12.7 years; HbA1c: 7.2±1.2% (60±10 mmol/mol) to accurately estimate carbohydrates by analyzing 72-h food records and their corresponding 72-h blood glucose excursions using a continuous glucose monitor.
The mean meal carbohydrate difference, between the patients' estimates and those assessed by a dietitian using a computerized analysis program, was 15.4±7.8 g or 20.9±9.7% of the total CHO content per meal (72.4±34.7 g per meal). Sixty-three percent of the 448 meals analyzed were underestimated. Greater differences in CHO's estimates predicted higher glycemic variability, as measured by the MAGE index and glucose standard deviation, and decreased time with glucose values between 4 and 10 mmol/L (R²=0.110, 0.114 and 0.110, respectively; P
PubMed ID
23146371 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with the metabolic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47727
Source
Diabetes Care. 2001 Apr;24(4):683-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
B. Isomaa
P. Almgren
T. Tuomi
B. Forsén
K. Lahti
M. Nissén
M R Taskinen
L. Groop
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Jakobstad Hospital, Finland. bo.isomaa@fimnet.fi
Source
Diabetes Care. 2001 Apr;24(4):683-9
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Cholesterol - blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - complications - epidemiology
Family
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glucose Intolerance - blood - complications - epidemiology
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - blood
Hypertension - epidemiology
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Obesity - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of and the cardiovascular risk associated with the metabolic syndrome using the new definition proposed by the World Health Organization RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 4,483 subjects aged 35-70 years participating in a large family study of type 2 diabetes in Finland and Sweden (the Botnia study) were included in the analysis of cardiovascular risk associated with the metabolic syndrome. In subjects who had type 2 diabetes (n = 1,697), impaired fasting glucose (IFG)/impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (n = 798) or insulin-resistance with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (n = 1,988), the metabolic syndrome was defined as presence of at least two of the following risk factors: obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, or microalbuminuria. Cardiovascular mortality was assessed in 3,606 subjects with a median follow-up of 6.9 years. RESULTS: In women and men, respectively, the metabolic syndrome was seen in 10 and 15% of subjects with NGT, 42 and 64% of those with IFG/IGT, and 78 and 84% of those with type 2 diabetes. The risk for coronary heart disease and stroke was increased threefold in subjects with the syndrome (P
PubMed ID
11315831 View in PubMed
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Caries and salivary status in young adults with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47699
Source
Swed Dent J. 2001;25(2):53-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
E. Edblad
S A Lundin
B. Sjödin
J. Aman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pedodontics, Postgraduate Dental Education Centre, Orebro, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 2001;25(2):53-60
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Glucose - analysis
Buffers
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
DMF Index
Dental Caries - classification
Dental Plaque Index
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - drug therapy - physiopathology
Diabetic Retinopathy - classification
Female
Fluorescein Angiography
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Insulin - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Lactobacillus - growth & development
Male
Pit and Fissure Sealants - therapeutic use
Retrospective Studies
Saliva - microbiology - secretion
Secretory Rate
Streptococcus mutans - growth & development
Sweden
Tooth Exfoliation
Tooth, Deciduous - pathology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the salivary status, prevalence of caries and the status of primary dentition, when primary teeth were exfoliated, in 41 patients, 18-24 years of age, with type 1 diabetes since childhood in comparison with age- and sex-matched non-diabetic controls. The blood glucose and glycosylated haemoglobin concentration (HbA1c), dosage of daily insulin and retinal fundus photography was recorded for the diabetic group. According to the concentration of HbA1c, the diabetic patients were divided into well and poorly controlled groups. The study was based on three intra-oral photos, dental examination including intra-oral radiographs, flow rate and buffering capacity of the saliva and amount of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Retrospective data regarding the primary dentition was found in the dental files of each patient, and are based on the last registration for respective tooth before exfoliation. The patients with type 1 diabetes, without any relationship to metabolic control, displayed more initial buccal caries compared to healthy controls (p
PubMed ID
11471967 View in PubMed
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131 records – page 1 of 14.