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16 records – page 1 of 2.

An audit of blood component therapy in a Canadian general teaching hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230993
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Apr 1;140(7):812-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1989
Author
W F Brien
R J Butler
M J Inwood
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, St. Joseph's Health Centre of London, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Apr 1;140(7):812-5
Date
Apr-1-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Transfusion - utilization
Erythrocyte Transfusion
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Medical Audit
Ontario
Plasma
Retrospective Studies
Serum Albumin - administration & dosage
Utilization Review
Abstract
As part of a quality assurance program a retrospective audit of transfusion practices for packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma and albumin was undertaken with predetermined criteria in a general teaching hospital. Of 520 transfusion episodes with 1218 units of packed red blood cells given to 297 patients 88% were considered appropriate; of 106 episodes with 405 units of fresh frozen plasma given to 83 patients 90% were deemed appropriate; and of 187 episodes with 320 units of albumin given to 99 patients 64% were considered appropriate. The results of this audit, when compared with those of other surveys of blood use in a similar population, suggest that pretransfusion approval of requested components would reduce the number of inappropriate transfusions.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1977 Jan 24;237(4):355-60 CONTD576167
Cites: JAMA. 1977 Jan 31;237(5):460-3 concl576269
Cites: JAMA. 1979 Jun 8;241(23):2527-9439338
Cites: JAMA. 1979 Nov 9;242(19):2087-90490788
Cites: Transfusion. 1985 Mar-Apr;25(2):113-53984004
Cites: Vox Sang. 1985;48(6):366-94013137
Cites: Transfusion. 1986 Jan-Feb;26(1):107-123945995
Cites: Transfusion. 1987 Mar-Apr;27(2):192-53103270
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1987 Aug 1;295(6593):2873115415
PubMed ID
2924231 View in PubMed
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[Blood donors at the county of Funen. Status based on more than five years of experience, 1995-2000]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71772
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Nov 12;163(46):6412-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-12-2001
Author
T. Kristensen
J. Georgsen
Author Affiliation
Odense Universitetshospital, klinisk immunologisk afdeling, 5000 Odense C.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Nov 12;163(46):6412-6
Date
Nov-12-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Blood Banks - statistics & numerical data
Blood Donors - supply & distribution
Blood Transfusion - utilization
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The Danish blood donor organisation is considered to be one of the best organised in the world. At the same time, Denmark has very high numbers of blood donations and blood transfusions, compared to the number of inhabitants. In recent years, pressure has been put on the donor organisation, owing to a decline in the number of donors and because new treatment modalities and other initiatives take blood transfusion for granted. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Information from the electronic databases of the County of Funen Transfusion Service on all blood donors in the county and its donor organisations from 1995 to September 2000 was extracted and analysed. RESULTS: In September 2000, the County of Funen had 21,087 active blood donors organised in eight bodies, i.e. 4% of the inhabitants. There are significant differences between these bodies, but common to all is a relative lack of donors between the age of 18 and 35 years. Each year about 10% of the donors withdraw, which is equal to 14,127 donors in the period analysed. This withdrawal is only partly balanced by 7820 new donors, with the result that the total number of donors in the county is declining by an average of 1100 donors a year. DISCUSSION: Several possibilities for action are proposed, for instance intensive recruitment campaigns, mobile blood drawing units, a change in the opening hours of blood banks, optimisation of the stocks, but, above all, the possibilities of reducing the amount of blood needed for transfusion. The Funen as well as the Danish health authorities must realise that blood for transfusion is no longer in unlimited supply, but in the future will be a rather restricted good.
PubMed ID
11816918 View in PubMed
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Cesarean section: is pretransfusion testing for red cell alloantibodies necessary?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63231
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2005 May;84(5):448-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Rune Larsen
Kjell Titlestad
Søren Thue Lillevang
Sten Grove Thomsen
Kristian Kidholm
Jørgen Georgsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Immunology, Odense University Hospital, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2005 May;84(5):448-55
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Grouping and Crossmatching - utilization
Blood Transfusion - utilization
Cesarean Section
Denmark - epidemiology
Erythrocytes - immunology
Female
Hospitals
Humans
Isoantibodies - analysis
Maternal Health Services - utilization
Medical Records
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - utilization
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Unnecessary Procedures
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Routine pretransfusion testing for red cell alloantibodies (RBCab) in cesarean patients is standard practice in many obstetric centers. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of this test. METHOD: A retrospective study was conducted using computerized registers to extract data on blood transfusions and the occurrence of RBCab in cesarean patients. RESULTS: A total of 4434 admissions for cesarean section were identified. Only 10 patients (0.23%) had clinically significant RBCab, which had not been previously detected. Blood transfusions were required in relation to 147 cesarean sections (3.3%). A number of preoperative conditions, traditionally believed to be risk factors for preoperative and postpartum hemorrhage, occurred more frequently in transfused patients than in nontransfused. The probability of a cesarean patient having a previously undetected clinically significant RBCab and receiving a blood transfusion during admission for delivery was estimated to be 9.0 x 10(-5) (1 in 11 050 cesarean sections). Analyses of the time relationships between cesarean sections and initiation of blood transfusions indicated that most often there would be enough time for postoperative antibody screening and/or cross matching if the routine pretransfusion testing was omitted. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that routine pretransfusion testing in cesarean patients can be omitted.
PubMed ID
15842209 View in PubMed
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Health and socioeconomic status differences among antibody hepatitis C positive and negative transfusion recipients, 1986-1990.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186003
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Mar-Apr;94(2):130-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Robert S Hogg
Kevin J P Craib
David Pi
Samuel S Lee
Gerald Y Minuk
Colin M Shapiro
Martin T Schechter
Michael V O'Shaughnessy
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC. bobhogg@hivnet.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Mar-Apr;94(2):130-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Transfusion - utilization
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fatigue
Female
Health status
Hepatitis C - economics - physiopathology - transmission
Hepatitis C Antibodies - blood
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Social Class
Abstract
To characterize the socioeconomic and health status, disease symptoms of anti-HCV-positive and negative transfusion recipients.
A cross-sectional interviewer-administered survey of subjects identified through the British Columbia Blood Recipient Program. Study subjects were 18 years and over and had to have had a transfusion between August 1, 1986 and June 30, 1990 and completed an interview of satisfactory quality. Anti-HCV-positive subjects were those seeking monetary compensation from the provincial and Canadian governments and the comparison group was randomly selected from a pool of anti-HCV-negative subjects. The study was designed to detect an assumed difference of 20% in signs and symptoms between the two groups. Statistical comparisons were conducted using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses.
A total of 241 and 222 anti-HCV-positive and negative subjects were respectively interviewed and met the study's eligibility criteria. Results from the multivariate analysis indicated that anti-HCV-positive recipients were more likely to have two or more clinical symptoms (OR = 3.53; 95% CI: 1.44, 8.70), to be in worse health status as compared to ten years previous (OR = 1.60; 95% CI: 1.30, 1.96), to have a higher illness intrusiveness rating (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 1.25, 1.46), and to be younger (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95, 0.98).
Our results show that persons exposed to HCV were more likely to have had two or more clinical symptoms, be male, have worse health status as compared to ten years previous, have a higher illness intrusiveness rating, and be younger in age.
PubMed ID
12675170 View in PubMed
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Institutional variation in hemotherapy for solid organ transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212594
Source
Transfusion. 1996 Mar;36(3):263-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
C F Danielson
R S Filo
J A O'Donnell
L J McCarthy
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indiana University Medical Center, USA.
Source
Transfusion. 1996 Mar;36(3):263-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Component Removal
Blood Component Transfusion - utilization
Blood Transfusion - utilization
Canada
Child
Cytomegalovirus Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Gamma Rays
Humans
Immunity
Leukocytes
Organ Transplantation - methods
United States
Abstract
Solid organ allograft recipients may require large amounts of blood components. The modification of components to make them safer for iatrogenically immunosuppressed transplant patients increases workload demands on blood banks and transfusion services.
Institutions within the United States and Canada providing hemotherapy as support for transplant recipients were surveyed for their transfusion practices.
Responses from 25 institutions provide the data for this report. In 1991, the mean intraoperative red cell requirements ranged from
Notes
Erratum In: Transfusion 1996 Aug;36(8):764
PubMed ID
8604514 View in PubMed
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Management of blunt splenic injury in children: evolution of the nonoperative approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151050
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2009 May;44(5):1005-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Dafydd A Davies
Richard H Pearl
Sigmund H Ein
Jacob C Langer
Paul W Wales
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatric General Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2009 May;44(5):1005-8
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood Transfusion - utilization
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Management
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Spleen - injuries
Splenectomy - utilization
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Unnecessary Procedures
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
Nonoperative management of blunt splenic injury (BSI) was first proposed at our institution in 1948. Since that time, treatment of patients with BSI has evolved from routine splenectomy to an aggressive spleen-preserving philosophy. This report summarizes our institutional experience for the last 50 years.
All children (0-18 years) admitted to our pediatric trauma center with BSI during 4 eras (1956-1965, 1972-1977, 1981-1986, and 1992-2006) were retrospectively reviewed for demographics, injury patterns, management, and complications.
During the 4 eras captured for the last 5 decades, 486 children experienced BSI. The mean age was 10 years with 347 males (71%). Nonoperative management rate increased from 42% to 97% with improvement in splenic salvage rate (42%-99%). Mean length of stay decreased from 17 to 5 days. In patients with isolated splenic injuries (50%), nonoperative management rate increased (36%-100%) and fewer received transfusions (60%-1%). Overall mortality rate improved (19%-6.6%, 8%-0.7% in isolated injuries).
The management of BSI in children has changed dramatically for the last 50 years. This study clearly demonstrates the safety of nonoperative management and documents progressively lower rates of splenectomy and transfusion, shorter hospitalization, and an extremely low risk of mortality.
PubMed ID
19433187 View in PubMed
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Mortality, morbidity, and costs of ruptured and elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs in Nova Scotia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186410
Source
Ann Vasc Surg. 2003 Mar;17(2):171-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Hall F Chew
C K You
Murray G Brown
Benjamin E Heisler
Pantelis Andreou
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Ann Vasc Surg. 2003 Mar;17(2):171-9
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - economics - mortality - surgery
Aortic Rupture - economics - mortality - surgery
Blood Transfusion - utilization
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - economics - mortality
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Female
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAA) have a 78-94% mortality rate. If cost-effectiveness of screening programs for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are to be assessed, direct costs for RAAA repairs and elective AAA (EAAA) repairs are required. This study reports mortality, morbidity, and direct costs for RAAA and EAAA repairs in Nova Scotia in 1997-1998 and also compares Nova Scotia and U.S. costs. We performed a retrospective study of 41 consecutive RAAA and 48 randomly selected EAAA patients. Average total costs for RAAA repair were significantly greater than those for EAAA repair (direct costs: $15,854 vs. $9673; direct plus overhead costs: $18,899 vs. $12,324 [pricing in 1998 Canadian dollars]). Intensive care unit length of stay and blood product usage were the most substantial direct cost differentials ($3593 and $2106). Direct cost for preoperative testing and surveillance was greater in the EAAA group ($839 vs. $33). Estimates of U.S. in-hospital RAAA and EAAA repair costs are more than 1.5 times Nova Scotia costs. Direct in-hospital RAAA repair costs are $6181 more than EAAA repair costs. These in-hospital cost data are key cost elements required to assess the cost-effectiveness of various screening strategies for earlier detection and monitoring of AAA within high-risk populations in Canada. Further studies are required to estimate cost per quality-adjusted-life-year gained for various AAA screening and monitoring strategies in Canada.
PubMed ID
12616362 View in PubMed
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National consensus on management of peptic ulcer bleeding in Denmark 2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264618
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Nov;61(11):B4969
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Stig Borbjerg Laursen
Henrik Stig Jørgensen
Ove B Schaffalitzky de Muckadell
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Nov;61(11):B4969
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Aspirin - therapeutic use
Blood Transfusion - utilization
Consensus
Denmark
Drug Therapy, Combination - methods
Hemostasis, Endoscopic - methods
Hospitalization
Humans
Peptic Ulcer - drug therapy - prevention & control
Peptic Ulcer Hemorrhage - prevention & control - therapy
Proton Pump Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Secondary Prevention
Abstract
The Danish Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology have compiled a national guideline for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Sources of data included published studies up to June 2014. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved by the Danish Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology September 4, 2011. The current version is revised June 2014.
RECOMMENDATIONS emphasize the importance of early and efficient resuscitation. Use of a restrictive blood transfusion policy is recommended in haemodynamically stable patients without serious ischaemic disease. Endoscopy should generally be performed within 24 hours, reducing operation rate, rebleeding rate and duration of in-patient stay. When serious ulcer bleeding is suspected and blood found in gastric aspirate, endoscopy within 12 hours will result in faster discharge and reduced need for transfusions. Endoscopic hemostasis remains indicated for high-risk lesions. Hemoclips, thermocoagulation, and epinephrine injection are effective in achieving endoscopic hemostasis. Use of endoscopic monotherapy with epinephrine injection is not recommended. Intravenous high-dose proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy for 72 hours after successful endoscopic hemostasis is recommended even though the evidence is questionable. Although selected patients can be discharged promptly after endoscopy, high-risk patients should be hospitalized for at least three days after endoscopic hemostasis. Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who require secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis should start receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) within 24 hours from primary endoscopy. Patients in need of continued treatment with ASA or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug should be put on prophylactic treatment with PPI at standard dosage. The combination of 75 mg ASA and PPI should be preferred to monotherapy with clopidogrel in patients needing anti-platelet therapy on the basis of indications other than coronary stents. Low-risk patients without clinical suspicion of peptic ulcer bleeding who have a Glasgow Blatchford score = 1 can be offered out-patient care, unless hospital admission is required for other reasons.
PubMed ID
25370969 View in PubMed
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A national survey of complications associated with suction lipectomy: a comparative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230115
Source
Plast Reconstr Surg. 1989 Oct;84(4):628-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1989
Author
B. Teimourian
W B Rogers
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Suburban Hospital, Bethesda, Md.
Source
Plast Reconstr Surg. 1989 Oct;84(4):628-31
Date
Oct-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Muscles - surgery
Adipose Tissue - surgery
Blood Transfusion - utilization
Canada
Ethanol - administration & dosage
Health Surveys
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Lipectomy - adverse effects - methods
Postoperative Complications
United States
Abstract
In March of 1988, a survey form was sent to all 2695 U.S. and Canadian members of the American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons. Nine-hundred and thirty-five members responded, for a response rate of 34.7 percent. The purpose of the survey was to ascertain the total number of major liposuction, dermatolipectomy, and abdominoplasty procedures performed from January of 1984 to January of 1988 and to compare nine specific complications that are associated with these three procedures. The 935 surgeons reported a total of 112,756 procedures performed: major liposuction (75,591), dermatolipectomy (10,603), and abdominoplasty (26,562). Nine major complications were surveyed: mortality, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident or transient ischemic attack, pulmonary thromboembolism, fat embolism, major skin loss, anesthesia complication, transfusion complications, and deep venous thrombosis. The findings in this survey showed, when comparing these three procedures and the nine types of complications, that the complication rate for major suction lipectomy was 0.1 percent, for dermatolipectomy 0.9 percent, and for abdominoplasty 2.0 percent. Fat emboli did not prove to be a significant factor associated with any of the three procedures. However, of the 15 reported deaths (major liposuction 2, dermatolipectomy 2, and abdominoplasty 11), pulmonary thromboembolism was the causative factor in 9 deaths (60 percent). Based on these analyzed data, we feel that major suction lipectomy has a low complication rate and is a reasonably safe procedure.
PubMed ID
2528776 View in PubMed
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Outcomes following neonatal patent ductus arteriosus ligation done by pediatric surgeons: a retrospective cohort analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113671
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2013 May;48(5):915-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Katherine Hutchings
Andrea Vasquez
David Price
Brian H Cameron
Saeed Awan
Grant G Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Janeway Children's Hospital, St. John's Newfoundland, NL, Canada, A1B 3V6.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2013 May;48(5):915-8
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Transfusion - utilization
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Ductus Arteriosus, Patent - drug therapy - mortality - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
General Surgery - education
Gestational Age
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, Pediatric - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Teaching - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - mortality - surgery
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Intraoperative Complications - epidemiology
Ligation - education
Male
Patient Transfer - statistics & numerical data
Pediatrics - education
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Respiration, Artificial - utilization
Retrospective Studies
Tertiary Care Centers - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) ligation in premature infants is an urgent procedure performed by some but not all pediatric surgeons. Proficiency in PDA ligation is not a requirement of Canadian pediatric surgery training. Our purpose was to determine the outcomes of neonatal PDA ligation done by pediatric surgeons.
We performed a retrospective review of premature infants who underwent PDA ligation by pediatric surgeons in 3 Canadian centers from 2005 to 2009. Outcomes were compared to published controls.
The review identified 98 patients with a mean corrected GA and weight at repair of 29 weeks and 1122 g, respectively. There were no intraoperative deaths. The 30-day and inhospital mortality rates were 1% and 5%. Mortality and morbidity were comparable to the published outcomes.
This study documents that a significant number of preterm infant PDA ligations are safely done by pediatric surgeons. To meet the Canadian needs for this service by pediatric surgeons, proficiency in PDA ligation should be considered important in pediatric surgery training programs.
PubMed ID
23701759 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.