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1913 men study - a longitudinal study of the development of stroke in a population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250389
Source
Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1977;14:122-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
R. Adolfsson
K. Svärdsudd
G. Tibblin
Source
Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1977;14:122-7
Date
1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood pressure
Blood Sedimentation
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Cholesterol - blood
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Risk
Smoking
Abstract
Risk factors for the development of stroke was studied in a prospective long-term investigation of 855 male in a random population sampled of the same age. After 13 years of follow-up 25 participants had suffered from stroke, which gives an incidence of 19/10,000 annually. At the 1963 year investigation several parametras were studied. The stroke-prone person had higher values of systolic and diastolic blood pressure and had a significant greater total heart volume. Blood parametras as the fasting of serum cholesterole, triglyceride and erytrocyte sedimentation rate were significantly elevated in those who developed stroke. They also tended to consume more coffee and showed a higher tobacco consumption. By applying the multiple regression model it was disclosed that the most predective risk-variables were diastolic blood pressure, erytrocyte sedimentation rate and smoking habits.
PubMed ID
298994 View in PubMed
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Active Rheumatoid Arthritis in Central Africa: A Comparative Study Between Sudan and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287360
Source
J Rheumatol. 2016 Oct;43(10):1777-1786
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Amir I Elshafie
Abdalla D Elkhalifa
Sahwa Elbagir
Mawahib I E Aledrissy
Elnour M Elagib
Musa A M Nur
Tomas Weitoft
Johan Rönnelid
Source
J Rheumatol. 2016 Oct;43(10):1777-1786
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy
Biological Products - therapeutic use
Blood Sedimentation
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Male
Methotrexate - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Prednisolone - therapeutic use
Rheumatoid Factor - blood
Severity of Illness Index
Sudan
Sulfasalazine - therapeutic use
Sweden
Symptom Assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
To compare clinical characteristics and treatment between simultaneously investigated Sudanese and Swedish outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
Outpatients with RA from Sudan (n = 281) and Sweden (n = 542) diagnosed according to the 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria were recruited between December 2008 and September 2010 and compared concerning clinical presentation, treatment, and laboratory findings, including immunoglobulin M with rheumatoid factor (IgM-RF).
Sudanese patients had lower inclusion age (median 49 vs 68 yrs), disease duration (48 vs 107 mos), and disease onset age (43 vs 56 yrs) as compared with Swedish patients (p
PubMed ID
27481904 View in PubMed
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Acute haematogenous osteomyelitis in children in Finland. Finnish Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219697
Source
Ann Med. 1993 Dec;25(6):545-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
L. Unkila-Kallio
M J Kallio
H. Peltola
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Ann Med. 1993 Dec;25(6):545-9
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Bacteremia - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology - therapy
Blood Sedimentation
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Haemophilus Infections - diagnosis
Haemophilus influenzae - isolation & purification
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Osteomyelitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology - therapy
Pneumococcal Infections - diagnosis
Prospective Studies
Staphylococcal Infections - diagnosis
Streptococcal Infections - diagnosis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to evaluate the history, clinical picture and diagnostic difficulties of acute haematogenous osteomyelitis (AHOM) in children. Forty-seven children under the age of 15 with bacteriologically proven AHOM were collected prospectively in Finland in 1981-93. Staphylococcus aureus was responsible for 89% of the cases. The commonest sites affected were the tibia (25%) and the femur (23%) followed by the pelvis (15%) and the calcaneus (11%). Sites other than the long bones increased in frequency in children over the age of 4 years. Most of the children came with a history of a week or less with classic signs and symptoms of AHOM, increased C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) values but negative X-rays. Delay in hospital admission was observed in 19%. In 11% antimicrobial therapy was not instituted within 48 hours on ward. All children were clinically healthy at the 1-year check-up with minor X-ray changes seen in 11 patients. We conclude that children in Finland seek treatment early in the course of AHOM and have a good outcome. S. aureus is the main aetiological agent affecting primarily the long bones, but in older children pelvic and calcaneic sites are also frequent. No significant delays affecting the outcome were noticed in admittance to hospital or in the diagnosis of AHOM.
PubMed ID
8292304 View in PubMed
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Adolescent body mass index and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in relation to colorectal cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283749
Source
Gut. 2016 Aug;65(8):1289-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Elizabeth D Kantor
Ruzan Udumyan
Lisa B Signorello
Edward L Giovannucci
Scott Montgomery
Katja Fall
Source
Gut. 2016 Aug;65(8):1289-95
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Sedimentation
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammation - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Adult obesity and inflammation have been associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC); however, less is known about how adolescent body mass index (BMI) and inflammation, as measured by erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), relate to CRC risk. We sought to evaluate these associations in a cohort of 239 658 Swedish men who underwent compulsory military enlistment examinations in late adolescence (ages 16-20 years).
At the time of the conscription assessment (1969-1976), height and weight were measured and ESR was assayed. By linkage to the national cancer registry, these conscripts were followed for CRC through 1 January 2010. Over an average of 35 years of follow-up, 885 cases of CRC occurred, including 501 colon cancers and 384 rectal cancers. Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted HRs and corresponding 95% CIs.
Compared with normal weight (BMI 18.5 to
Notes
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PubMed ID
25986947 View in PubMed
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[Age distribution of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and their severity grade in children (author's transl)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243373
Source
Monatsschr Kinderheilkd. 1982 Mar;130(3):139-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1982
Author
J. Elo
L G Tallgren
S. Sarna
Source
Monatsschr Kinderheilkd. 1982 Mar;130(3):139-42
Date
Mar-1982
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Blood Sedimentation
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Humans
Leukocyte Count
Male
Sex Factors
Urinary Tract Infections - blood - epidemiology - radiography
Urography
Abstract
Urinary tract infections in 339 children (77 boys and 262 girls) have been followed up. An excretory urography and a urethrocystography were done for all the children. The frequency of functional and anatomical abnormalities is given. The severity grade of UTI was determined according to the classification of Elo and Stenström. Almost all episodes of UTI among boys occurred during the first three years of life and were mostly severe. After the 3rd year of life the occurrence of UTI among the boys was sporadic. Among the girls the severe episodes dominates during the first three years of life, but after that the episodes tended to become milder in character becoming mostly asymptomatic. The peak of asymptomatic episodes among girls was at 10 years of age. After that age the number of episodes dropped abruptly. The classification used, based on the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and on white blood cell count (WBC), has shown to be useful and makes it possible to differentiate between renal (pyelonephritic) episodes and the lower tract episodes.
PubMed ID
7087971 View in PubMed
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Analytical performance specifications based on how clinicians use laboratory tests. Experiences from a post-analytical external quality assessment programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270020
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2015 May;53(6):857-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Geir Thue
Sverre Sandberg
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2015 May;53(6):857-62
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood Sedimentation
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - standards
Creatinine - blood - urine
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
International Normalized Ratio
Norway
Quality Control
Reference Values
Serum Albumin - analysis
Abstract
Analytical performance specifications can be based on three different models: the effect of analytical performance on clinical outcome, based on components of biological variation of the measurand or based on state-of-the-art. Models 1 and 3 may to some degree be combined by using case histories presented to a large number of clinicians. The Norwegian Quality Improvement of Primary Care Laboratories (Noklus) has integrated vignettes in its external quality assessment programme since 1991, focusing on typical clinical situations in primary care. Haemoglobin, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), HbA1c, glucose, u-albumin, creatinine/estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and Internationl Normalised Ratio (INR) have been evaluated focusing on critical differences in test results, i.e., a change from a previous result that will generate an "action" such as a change in treatment or follow-up of the patient. These critical differences, stated by physicians, can translate into reference change values (RCVs) and assumed analytical performance can be calculated. In general, assessments of RCVs and therefore performance specifications vary both within and between groups of doctors, but with no or minor differences regarding specialisation, age or sex of the general practitioner. In some instances state-of-the-art analytical performance could not meet clinical demands using 95% confidence, whereas clinical demands were met using 80% confidence in nearly all instances. RCVs from vignettes should probably not be used on their own as a basis for setting analytical performance specifications, since clinicians seem "uninformed" regarding important principles. They could rather be used as a background for focus groups of "informed" physicians in discussions of performance specifications tailored to "typical" clinical situations.
PubMed ID
25883204 View in PubMed
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Anemia in early rheumatoid arthritis is associated with interleukin 6-mediated bone marrow suppression, but has no effect on disease course or mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86386
Source
J Rheumatol. 2008 Mar;35(3):380-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Nikolaisen Cathrin
Figenschau Yngve
Nossent Johannes C
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. cathrin.nikolaisen@unn.no
Source
J Rheumatol. 2008 Mar;35(3):380-6
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - complications - mortality
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications - mortality
Blood Sedimentation
Bone Marrow - physiopathology
Female
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Interleukin-6 - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Survival Analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is the most common extraarticular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but there is limited information on the cause and consequences of ACD. We investigated the prevalence, relation with proinflammatory cytokines, and effect on disease outcome of ACD in patients with RA. METHODS: The presence of anemia was analyzed in a cohort of 111 consecutive patients with early RA. Anemia was related to markers of erythropoiesis and inflammation [clinically and by levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and serum interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha]. The frequency of various disease outcomes during the mean followup of 74 months was compared between ACD and nonanemic patients. RESULTS: ACD was present in 25% during the first year of disease. ACD was associated with higher CRP (45 vs 22 g/l; p = 0.04) and ESR levels (54 vs 33 mm/h; p = 0.002). Hemoglobin levels were inversely correlated with serum erythropoietin (p = 0.003) in univariate analysis, but in multivariate analysis only ESR (p = 0.005) and IL-6 (p = 0.056) remained as independent predictors of hemoglobin levels. Presence of ACD was not associated with later development of disease manifestations or mortality. CONCLUSION: While ACD affected 25% of patients with RA early in the disease course, this had no influence on disease outcome including mortality during the following 6 years. The association between IL-6 and ACD suggests that IL-6-mediated bone marrow suppression is the main mechanism for development of ACD in RA.
PubMed ID
18260177 View in PubMed
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Anemia, nutritional status, and inflammation in hospitalized elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92557
Source
Nutrition. 2008 Nov-Dec;24(11-12):1116-22
Publication Type
Article

An epidemiological study of child health and nutrition in a northern Swedish county. 3. Medical and anthropometrical examinations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43810
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1971 Nov;60(6):653-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1971

147 records – page 1 of 15.