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The 2000 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: part two--diagnosis and assessment of people with high blood pressure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192030
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1249-63
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
K B Zarnke
M. Levine
F A McAlister
N R Campbell
M G Myers
D W McKay
P. Bolli
G. Honos
M. Lebel
K. Mann
T W Wilson
C. Abbott
S. Tobe
E. Burgess
S. Rabkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, London Health Sciences Centre, University of Western Ontario, 339 Windermere Road, London, Ontario N6A 5A5, Canada. Kelly.Zarnke@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1249-63
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - complications
Adult
Blood Pressure Determination - methods - psychology - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods - standards
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - standards
Diabetes Complications
Diabetic Nephropathies - complications - diagnosis
Echocardiography - standards
Electrocardiography
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Hypertension, Renovascular - diagnosis
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - ultrasonography
Office Visits
Patient compliance
Pheochromocytoma - complications - diagnosis
Risk factors
Self Care - methods - standards
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of high blood pressure in adults.
For people with high blood pressure, the assignment of a diagnosis of hypertension depends on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation, the duration of follow-up and the presence of concomitant vascular risk factors, target organ damage and established atherosclerotic diseases. For people diagnosed with hypertension, defining the overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires laboratory testing, a search for target organ damage and an assessment of the modifiable causes of hypertension. Out-of-clinic blood pressure assessment and echocardiography are options for selected patients.
People at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes and were identified and quantified.
Medline searches were conducted from the period of the last revision of the Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension (May 1998 to October 2000). Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify other studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised, using prespecified levels of evidence, by content experts and methodological experts.
A high value was placed on the identification of people at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
The identification of people at higher risk of cardiovascular disease will permit counselling for lifestyle manoeuvres and the introduction of antihypertensive drugs to reduce blood pressure for patients with sustained hypertension. In certain settings, and for specific classes of drugs, blood pressure lowering has been associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and/or mortality.
The present document contains detailed recommendations pertaining to aspects of the diagnosis and assessment of patients with hypertension, including the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for the diagnosis of hypertension and recommendations for follow-up, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular hypertension, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the role of echocardiography in hypertension.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Recommendations Working Group. Only the recommendations achieving high levels of consensus are reported here. These guidelines will be updated annually.
These recommendations are endorsed by the Canadian Hypertension Society, The Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, The College of Family Physicians of Canada, The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, The Adult Disease Division and Bureau of Cardio-Respiratory Diseases and Diabetes at the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control of Health Canada.
PubMed ID
11773936 View in PubMed
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Active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology in patients with arterial hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120508
Source
J Am Soc Hypertens. 2012 Sep-Oct;6(5):346-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anton R Kiselev
Vladimir I Gridnev
Vladimir A Shvartz
Olga M Posnenkova
Pavel Ya Dovgalevsky
Author Affiliation
Centre of New Cardiological Informational Technologies, Saratov Research Institute of Cardiology, Saratov, Russia. antonkis@list.ru
Source
J Am Soc Hypertens. 2012 Sep-Oct;6(5):346-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care - methods - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods - standards
Cellular Phone
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Disease Management
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - therapy
Male
Medication Therapy Management
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Management - organization & administration
Quality Improvement
Russia
Text Messaging
Abstract
The use of short message services and mobile phone technology for ambulatory care management is the most accessible and most inexpensive way to transition from traditional ambulatory care management to active ambulatory care management in patients with arterial hypertension (AH). The aim of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology with traditional ambulatory care management in AH patients. The study included 97 hypertensive patients under active ambulatory care management and 102 patients under traditional ambulatory care management. Blood pressure levels, body mass, and smoking history of patients were analyzed in the study. The duration of study was 1 year. In the active ambulatory care management group, 36% of patients were withdrawn from the study within a year. At the end of the year, 77% of patients from the active care management group had achieved the goal blood pressure level. That was more than 5 times higher than that in the traditional ambulatory care management group (P
PubMed ID
22995803 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory blood pressure reproducibility and application of the method in a healthy Finnish cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211366
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1996 Aug;56(5):471-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
E. Hietanen
M. Wendelin-Saarenhovi
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1996 Aug;56(5):471-80
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods - standards
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Random Allocation
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Ventricular Function
Abstract
The aim of the present study has been to study the reproducibility, validity and normal values of ambulatory blood pressure measurement in a healthy Finnish cohort. The reproducibility of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was examined in healthy volunteers and normal values were determined in a Finnish cohort of males and women of different ages. In the reproducibility study the recording was repeated at 2-week intervals. In the validity study simultaneous measurements were done manually with a mercury sphygmomanometer and compared with the measurement by the ambulatory blood pressure recording unit, both connected with the cuff by a T-tube; this study included 100 consecutive measurements in a patient group. A relatively small cohort was taken from the normal value study group. In addition to ambulatory blood pressure their left ventricle mass was also determined by echocardiography. The correlation between manual blood pressure measurement and simultaneous measurement by the ambulatory blood pressure unit was 0.98. In the reproducibility study the correlations between the two 24-h measurements 2 weeks apart were also good. Depending on the parameter (daytime, nighttime or 24-h blood pressure mean, systolic or diastolic values) the correlation coefficient varied between 0.81 and 0.91. Thus both systolic and diastolic blood pressures, whether expressed as 24-h averages and daytime or nighttime averages, correlated well between these two recording sessions. The data obtained in the present Finnish cohort were well within the published reference value limits, showing only fairly modest age-dependence appearing at quite an old age. There was no significant correlation between the left ventricle mass and ambulatory blood pressure values in a population having normal blood pressure. The results suggest good intra-individual correlation and reproducibility in ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, suggesting this method to be useful in the monitoring of individual blood pressure levels. The validity of the method is good and the published reference values can be applied with reasonable reliability in different populations. In an adult population with normal blood pressure, no correlation between left ventricle mass and blood pressure values can be found, suggesting this correlation may first appear in cohorts including persons with elevated blood pressure values.
PubMed ID
8869670 View in PubMed
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Clinical experience with telemetric intracranial pressure monitoring in a Danish neurosurgical center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263249
Source
Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2014 May;120:36-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Alexander Lilja
Morten Andresen
Amer Hadi
Dorthe Christoffersen
Marianne Juhler
Source
Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2014 May;120:36-40
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods - standards
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Humans
Hydrocephalus - diagnosis
Intracranial Hypertension - diagnosis
Intracranial Pressure - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prostheses and Implants - adverse effects
Surgical Wound Infection
Telemetry - methods - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) is important in the optimal treatment of various neurological and neurosurgical diseases. Telemetric ICP monitoring allows long-term measurements in the patient's everyday life and the possibility to perform additional measurements without the procedure related risks of repeated transducer insertions.
We identified all patients in our clinic with an implanted Raumedic(®) telemetric ICP probe (NEUROVENT(®)-P-tel). For each patient we identified diagnosis, indication for implantation, surgical complications, duration of ICP reading, number of ICP recording sessions (in relation to symptoms of increased ICP) and their clinical consequence.
We included 21 patients in the evaluation (11 female and 10 male). Median age was 28 (2-83) years and median duration of disease was 11 (0-30) years. Eleven patients had various kinds of hydrocephalus, seven patients had idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and three patients had normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Fifteen patients had a shunt prior to implantation. Median duration of implantation was 248 (49-666) days and median duration from implantation to last recording session was 154 (8-433) days. In total, 86 recording sessions were performed; 29 resulted in surgical shunt revision, 30 in change of acetazolamide dose or programmable valve setting, 20 required no action and 5 resulted in a new recording session. No surgical complications occurred, except for late wound infection at the surgical site in two patients.
Telemetric ICP monitoring is useful in patients with complicated CSF dynamic disturbances who would otherwise require repeated invasive pressure monitoring. It seems to be a feasible method to guide adjustment of programmable valve settings and to identify patients with chronic or repeated shunt problems.
PubMed ID
24731573 View in PubMed
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[The FORTISSIMO program: advantages of fixed full dose combination of perindopril arginine and indapamide in the treatment of poorly controlled arterial hypertension].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115052
Source
Kardiologiia. 2013;53(3):37-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Iu A Karpov
Source
Kardiologiia. 2013;53(3):37-43
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods - standards
Disease Management
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Combinations
Drug Monitoring - methods
Drug resistance
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Indapamide - administration & dosage
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Perindopril - administration & dosage
Program Development
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In the Russian program FORTISSIMO administration of fixed combination of perindopril arginine/indapamide (10 mg/2.5 mg) in 2120 patients with poorly controlled arterial hypertension instead of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or -receptor antagonists (ARB) with hydrochlorothiazide given separately or in fixed combinations resulted in significant lowering of arterial pressure (AP) and achievement of its target level in 84% of patients. Mean AP was lowered from 177/99 to 130/80 mm Hg in 3 months while substantial reduction down to 149/89 mm Hg occurred just after 2 weeks of treatment. Improvement of compliance to therapy was also noted. Fixed perindopril/indapamide combination was well tolerated and turned out to be effective for AP control irrespective of previously conducted therapy (ACEI or ARB with diuretic).
PubMed ID
23548425 View in PubMed
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