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24-h ambulatory blood pressure is linked to chromosome 18q21-22 and genetic variation of NEDD4L associates with cross-sectional and longitudinal blood pressure in Swedes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81774
Source
Kidney Int. 2006 Aug;70(3):562-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Fava C.
von Wowern F.
Berglund G.
Carlson J.
Hedblad B.
Rosberg L.
Burri P.
Almgren P.
Melander O.
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, University Hospital MAS, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Kidney Int. 2006 Aug;70(3):562-9
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alternative Splicing
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - genetics
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18
Circadian Rhythm
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - genetics
Insulin - blood
Linkage (Genetics)
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases - genetics
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
Numerous linkage studies have indicated chromosome 18q21-22 as a locus of importance for blood pressure regulation. This locus harbors the neural precursor cell expressed developmentally downregulated 4-like (NEDD4L) gene, which is instrumental for the regulation of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). In a linkage study of 16 markers (including two single nucleotide polymorphism markers located within the NEDD4L gene) on chromosome 18 between 70-104 cM and ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), in 118 families, the strongest evidence of linkage was found for 24 h and day-time systolic ABP at the NEDD4L locus (82.25 cM) (P=0.0014). In a large population sample (n=4001), we subsequently showed that a NEDD4L gene variant (rs4149601), which by alternative splicing leads to varying expression of a functionally crucial C2 domain, was associated with diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (P=0.03) and DBP progression over time (P=0.04). A genotype combination of the rs4149601 and an intronic NEDD4L marker (rs2288774) was associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) (P=0.01), DBP (P=0.04), and progression of both SBP (P=0.03) and DBP (P=0.05) over time. A quantitative transmission disequilibrium test in the family material of the rs4149601 supported this NEDD4L variant as being at least partially causative of the linkage result. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the chromosome 18 linkage peak at 82.25 cM is explained by genetic NEDD4L variation affecting cross-sectional and longitudinal blood pressure, possibly as a consequence of altered NEDD4L interaction with ENaC.
PubMed ID
16788695 View in PubMed
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The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104335
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2014;10:247-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Tatyana Y Kuznetsova
Viktoria A Korneva
Evgeniya N Bryantseva
Vitaliy S Barkan
Artemy V Orlov
Igor N Posokhov
Anatoly N Rogoza
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Petrozavodsk State University, Petrozavodsk, Russia.
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2014;10:247-51
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Algorithms
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - standards
Circadian Rhythm
Diastole
Female
Healthy Volunteers
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Pulse Wave Analysis - standards
Reference Values
Russia
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Systole
Time Factors
Vascular Stiffness
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m(2), had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab(®) device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens(®) algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for "24-hour", "awake", and "asleep" periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects.
Notes
Cites: J Invasive Cardiol. 2009 Jun;21(6):270-719494403
Cites: Hypertens Res. 2012 Oct;35(10):980-722622282
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2010 Feb;23(2):180-519959999
Cites: J Hypertens. 2013 Jul;31(7):1281-35723817082
Cites: Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2011;7:649-5622140314
Cites: Age (Dordr). 2013 Dec;35(6):2345-5523319362
Cites: Hypertension. 2013 Jun;61(6):1148-923630945
Cites: Hypertension. 2013 Jun;61(6):1168-7623630950
Cites: J Hypertens. 2013 Sep;31(9):1731-6824029863
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2010 Oct;31(19):2338-5020530030
PubMed ID
24812515 View in PubMed
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[24-h profile of arterial pressure in hypertensive patients working in rotatory teams in conditions of Far North (Tyumen Region)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5525
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(1):41-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
L I Gapon
N P Shurkevich
A S Vetoshkin
Source
Ter Arkh. 2005;77(1):41-5
Date
2005
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Autonomic Nervous System - physiopathology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Expeditions
Female
Humans
Hypertension - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Russia
Abstract
AIM: To specify a 24-h profile of arterial pressure (AP) in hypertensive patients working in duty regime in the Far North (Tyumen Region). MATERIAL AND METHODS: AP parameters were studied in 155 males aged 25-59 with hypertension of stage I, II who were employed for duty work in the Far North areas and 38 control patients with hypertension stage I, II living in a moderate climatic zone (Tyumen). The groups were comparable by gender, age, duration of hypertension, office systolic and diastolic AP (SAP and DAP). All the patients have undergone 24-h monitoring of AP with assessment of basic mean parameters. RESULTS: The study group patients had scare symptoms and lower mean 24-h SAP, but high AP variability, high DAD as reflection of more significant structural changes of vessels and special functioning of the autonomic nervous system in the North. Mean 24-h AP showed more unfavourable changes in hypertensive subjects who had flight from Yamburg-Moscow-Yamburg. CONCLUSION: The data of the study dictate the necessity to develop a differentiated risk strategy for health promotion, prevention and treatment of hypertension in those who work in the North of Tyumen Region in duty regime.
PubMed ID
15759453 View in PubMed
Less detail

[24-hr monitoring arterial pressure in outpatients with cardiovascular risk factors in the Far North].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261133
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2013;91(10):38-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
V B Simonenko
K B Solov'eva
I V Dolbin
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2013;91(10):38-43
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Arterial Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Russia
Abstract
To study peculiar features of daily AP rhythm and profile in men with cardiovascular risk factors residing in the Far North.
The study included 115 servicemen divided into 3 groups (hypertensive disease (HD), hypertonic type neurocirculatory asthenia (NCA) and risk factor of cardiovascular diseases other than AH). HD was diagnosed based on multiple AP measurements and 24-hr monitoring.
HD was associated with elevated mean AP, load indices and AP variability All patients had pathological type of morning dynamics. Normal daily rhythm of systolic AP (SAP) was documented in 66.1% of the patients with HD and in 68% with cardiovascular risk factors without AH. Normal daily rhythm ofdiastolic AP (DAP) was recorded in 63.5% of the patients with HD and in 72% with cardiovascular risk factors without AH. In group 2, normal daily rhythms of SAP and DAP were found in 44 and 56% of the cases respectively.
Men residing in the Far North under conditions of anomalous photoperiod need medicamentous correction of AP regardless of AH type. Ambulatory BP monitoring should be preferred for the assessment of the efficacy of antihypertensive therapy.
PubMed ID
25696949 View in PubMed
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The 2000 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: part two--diagnosis and assessment of people with high blood pressure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192030
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1249-63
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
K B Zarnke
M. Levine
F A McAlister
N R Campbell
M G Myers
D W McKay
P. Bolli
G. Honos
M. Lebel
K. Mann
T W Wilson
C. Abbott
S. Tobe
E. Burgess
S. Rabkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, London Health Sciences Centre, University of Western Ontario, 339 Windermere Road, London, Ontario N6A 5A5, Canada. Kelly.Zarnke@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1249-63
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - complications
Adult
Blood Pressure Determination - methods - psychology - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods - standards
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - standards
Diabetes Complications
Diabetic Nephropathies - complications - diagnosis
Echocardiography - standards
Electrocardiography
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Hypertension, Renovascular - diagnosis
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - ultrasonography
Office Visits
Patient compliance
Pheochromocytoma - complications - diagnosis
Risk factors
Self Care - methods - standards
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of high blood pressure in adults.
For people with high blood pressure, the assignment of a diagnosis of hypertension depends on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation, the duration of follow-up and the presence of concomitant vascular risk factors, target organ damage and established atherosclerotic diseases. For people diagnosed with hypertension, defining the overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires laboratory testing, a search for target organ damage and an assessment of the modifiable causes of hypertension. Out-of-clinic blood pressure assessment and echocardiography are options for selected patients.
People at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes and were identified and quantified.
Medline searches were conducted from the period of the last revision of the Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension (May 1998 to October 2000). Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify other studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised, using prespecified levels of evidence, by content experts and methodological experts.
A high value was placed on the identification of people at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
The identification of people at higher risk of cardiovascular disease will permit counselling for lifestyle manoeuvres and the introduction of antihypertensive drugs to reduce blood pressure for patients with sustained hypertension. In certain settings, and for specific classes of drugs, blood pressure lowering has been associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and/or mortality.
The present document contains detailed recommendations pertaining to aspects of the diagnosis and assessment of patients with hypertension, including the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for the diagnosis of hypertension and recommendations for follow-up, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular hypertension, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the role of echocardiography in hypertension.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Recommendations Working Group. Only the recommendations achieving high levels of consensus are reported here. These guidelines will be updated annually.
These recommendations are endorsed by the Canadian Hypertension Society, The Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, The College of Family Physicians of Canada, The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, The Adult Disease Division and Bureau of Cardio-Respiratory Diseases and Diabetes at the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control of Health Canada.
PubMed ID
11773936 View in PubMed
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The 2001 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part one--Assessment for diagnosis, cardiovascular risk, causes and lifestyle modification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189435
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):604-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Kelly B Zarnke
Finlay A McAlister
Norman R C Campbell
Mitchell Levine
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Steven Grover
Donald W McKay
Martin G Myers
Thomas W Wilson
Simon W Rabkin
Ross D Feldman
Ellen Burgess
Peter Bolli
George Honos
Marcel Lebel
Karen Mann
Carl Abbott
Sheldon Tobe
Robert Petrella
Rhian M Touyz
Author Affiliation
London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital Campus, London, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):604-24
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - standards
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Diet
Exercise
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Life Style
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - diagnosis - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the assessment of the diagnosis, cardiovascular risk, identifiable causes and lifestyle modifications for adults with high blood pressure.
For persons in whom a high blood pressure value is recorded, hypertension is diagnosed based on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation and the duration of follow-up. In addition, the presence of concomitant vascular risk factors, target organ damage and established atherosclerotic diseases must be assessed to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment. For persons receiving a diagnosis of hypertension, defining the overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires an assessment of concomitant vascular risk factors, including laboratory testing, a search for target organ damage and an assessment for modifiable causes of hypertension. Home and ambulatory blood pressure assessment and echocardiography are options for selected patients.
The outcomes were: the identification of persons at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes; the quantification of overall cardiovascular risk; and the identification of persons with potentially modifiable causes of hypertension.
Medline searches were conducted from one year before the period of the last revision of the Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension (May 1999 to May 2001). Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify other studies. Identified articles were reviewed and appraised, using prespecified levels of evidence, by content experts and methodological experts. In addition to an update of the previous year's review, new sections on assessing overall cardiovascular risk and endocrine causes are provided.
A high value was placed on the identification of persons at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and of persons with identifiable causes of hypertension.
The identification of persons at higher risk of cardiovascular disease will permit counseling for lifestyle manoeuvres and introduction of antihypertensive drugs to reduce blood pressure for patients with sustained hypertension. The identification of specific causes of hypertension may permit the use of cause-specific interventions. In certain subgroups of patients, and for specific classes of drugs, blood pressure lowering has been associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity or mortality.
The present document contains recommendations for the assessment of the diagnosis, cardiovascular risk, identifiable causes and lifestyle modifications for adults with high blood pressure. These include the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for the diagnosis of hypertension and recommendations for follow-up, assessment of overall cardiovascular risk, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular and endocrine causes, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, the role of echocardiography and lifestyle modifications.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Recommendations Working Group. Only those recommendations achieving high levels of consensus are reported. These guidelines will be updated annually.
These guidelines are endorsed by the Canadian Hypertension Society, The Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, The College of Family Physicians of Canada, The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, The Adult Disease Division and Bureau of Cardio-Respiratory Diseases and Diabetes at the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Health Canada.
PubMed ID
12107419 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2004 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part I--Blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181499
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):31-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Kelly B Zarnke
Norman R C Campbell
Ross D Feldman
Donald W McKay
Finlay A McAlister
Nadia Khan
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Martin G Myers
Peter Bolli
George Honos
Marcel Lebel
Mitchell Levine
Raj Padwal
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):31-40
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - standards
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Diet
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Health Education - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Societies, Medical
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the assessment of the diagnosis, cardiovascular risk and identifiable causes for adults with high blood pressure.
For persons in whom a high blood pressure value is recorded, the assignment of a diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation and the duration of follow-up. In addition, the presence of concomitant vascular risk factors, target organ damage and established atherosclerotic diseases should be assessed to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment. For persons diagnosed as having hypertension, defining overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires an assessment of concomitant vascular risk factors, including laboratory testing, a search for target organ damage and an assessment for modifiable causes of hypertension. Home and ambulatory blood pressure assessment and echocardiography are options for selected patients.
The identification of persons at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes; the quantification of overall cardiovascular risk; and the identification of persons with potentially modifiable causes of hypertension.
Medline searches were conducted from November 2001, one year before the period of the last revision of the Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension, to October 2003. Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of subgroup members and authors were used to identify other studies. Identified articles were reviewed and appraised using prespecified levels of evidence by content experts and methodological experts.
A high value was placed on the identification of persons at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and persons with identifiable and potentially modifiable causes of hypertension.
The identification of persons at higher risk of cardiovascular disease will permit counselling for lifestyle maneuvers and introduction of antihypertensive drugs to reduce blood pressure for patients with sustained hypertension. The identification of specific causes of hypertension may permit the use of cause-specific interventions. For certain subgroups of patients and specific classes of drugs, blood pressure lowering has been associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and/or mortality.
The document contains recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis of hypertension and assessment of cardiovascular risk for adults with high blood pressure. These include the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for diagnosis of hypertension, and recommendations for follow-up, assessment of overall cardiovascular risk, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular and endocrine causes, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the role of echocardiography for those with hypertension.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. Only the recommendations that achieved high levels of consensus are reported. These guidelines will be updated annually.
PubMed ID
14968141 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2005 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part 1- blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173955
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):645-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Finlay A McAllister
Martin G Myers
Donald W McKay
Peter Bolli
Carl Abbott
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Steven Grover
George Honos
Marcel Lebel
Karen Mann
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Guy Tremblay
Sheldon W Tobe
Ross D Feldman
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):645-56
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Canada
Decision Trees
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - prevention & control
Patient Education as Topic
Risk assessment
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with high blood pressure (BP).
For persons in whom a high BP value is recorded, the assignment of a diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on the appropriate measurement of BP, the level of the BP elevation and the duration of follow-up. In addition, the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be assessed to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment. For persons diagnosed as having hypertension, estimating overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires an assessment of other vascular risk factors and hypertensive target organ damage.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2003 to October 2004 to update the 2004 recommendations. Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the authors and subgroup members were used to identify other studies. Identified articles were reviewed and appraised using prespecified levels of evidence by content and methodological experts. As per previous years, only studies that had been published in the peer-reviewed literature were included; evidence from abstracts, conference presentations and unpublished personal communications was not included.
This document contains recommendations for BP measurement, diagnosis of hypertension and assessment of cardiovascular risk for adults with high BP. These include the accurate measurement of BP, criteria for diagnosis of hypertension, and recommendations for follow-up, assessment of overall cardiovascular risk, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular and endocrine causes, home and ambulatory BP monitoring, and the role of echocardiography for those with hypertension. Key features of the 2005 recommendations include an expedited diagnostic algorithm for hypertension and an endorsement of the use of home/self and ambulatory BP assessment as validated techniques in establishing the diagnosis of hypertension.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the 43 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported in the present paper received at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
PubMed ID
16003448 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2007 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part 1- blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163301
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):529-38
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
May-15-2007
Author
Raj S Padwal
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Finlay A McAlister
Donald W McKay
Steven Grover
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Ellen Burgess
Peter Bolli
Michael Hill
Jeff Mahon
Martin G Myers
Carl Abbott
Ernest L Schiffrin
George Honos
Karen Mann
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Lyne Cloutier
Arun Chockalingam
Nadia A Khan
Simon W Rabkin
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta. rpadwal@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):529-38
Date
May-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Blood Pressure Determination
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Canada
Health promotion
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - physiopathology - prevention & control
Patient Education as Topic
Risk factors
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with hypertension.
The diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the timely assessment of serially elevated readings, the degree of blood pressure elevation, the method of measurement (office, ambulatory, home) and any associated comorbidities. The presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be ascertained to assess global cardiovascular risk, and to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment required.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2005 to October 2006 with the aid of a medical librarian. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of authors and subgroup members were used to identify additional studies. Content and methodological experts assessed studies using prespecified, standardized evidence-based algorithms. Recommendations were based on evidence from peer-reviewed, full-text articles only.
Recommendations for blood pressure measurement, criteria for hypertension diagnosis and follow-up, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, diagnostic testing, diagnosis of renovascular and endocrine causes of hypertension, home and ambulatory monitoring, and the use of echocardiography in hypertensive individuals are outlined. Key messages in 2007 include continued emphasis on the expedited, accurate diagnosis of hypertension, the importance of assessing the risk of cerebrovascular events as part of global risk assessment, the need for ongoing reassessment of patients with high normal blood pressure, and reviews of recent studies involving laboratory testing and home monitoring.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and were voted on by the 57 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here received at least 70% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):603-417593584
PubMed ID
17534459 View in PubMed
Less detail

2008 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations: an annual update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154273
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Nov;54(11):1539-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008

157 records – page 1 of 16.