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A 52-week prospective, cohort study of the effects of losartan with or without hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145472
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Nov;24(11):739-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
N. Racine
P. Hamet
J S Sampalis
N. Longo
N. Bastien
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Nov;24(11):739-48
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - chemically induced
Diuretics - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hydrochlorothiazide - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Hypertension - blood - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Linear Models
Losartan - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - complications - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The impact of an ARB, with or without hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), on glycaemic factors and the risk for developing diabetes in hypertensive patients with the metabolic syndrome have not been fully assessed. This was a 52-week multicentre, prospective, phase-IV, open-label, cohort study of losartan or losartan/HCTZ in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome. All subjects were treated initially with losartan 50?mg?day(-1). Those not achieving target blood pressure (BP
PubMed ID
20147971 View in PubMed
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Acarbose for the treatment of type II diabetes: the results of a Canadian multi-centre trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214600
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1995 Aug;28 Suppl:S167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
R G Josse
Author Affiliation
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1995 Aug;28 Suppl:S167-72
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acarbose
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Canada
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Diabetic diet
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Metformin - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Placebos
Sulfonylurea Compounds - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Trisaccharides - therapeutic use
Abstract
The treatment of Type II diabetes (NIDDM) includes an appropriate diet and prudent exercise program. If these measures are insufficient to control the blood sugar, oral agents (sulphonylureas or biguanides) or insulin are added to the therapeutic regimen. Although the diet prescription has undergone some changes and refinements, this approach has been the traditional treatment for NIDDM for nearly 40 years. Recently a new class of oral agents, the alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, has become available. These drugs are competitive inhibitors of the alpha-glucosidase enzymes in the brush border of the bowel wall. They act to slow and delay the rate of carbohydrate absorption, thereby decreasing postprandial hyperglycemia. A recent study was designed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of acarbose, an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, in improving the glycemic control of patients with NIDDM who were sub-optimally controlled on either diet alone, or diet plus sulphonylurea, metformin or insulin. A total of 354 patients with NIDDM were studied, 77 on diet alone, 83 on metformin, 103 and sulphonylurea and 91 on insulin. Subjects in each treatment stratum were randomized, double-blind to either acarbose or placebo, for 1 year. At baseline and every 3 months thereafter, fasting and postprandial glucose and C-peptide, HbA1c and fasting lipids were measured. Compared to placebo, acarbose treatment resulted in a decrease in mean postprandial glucose in all four strata (19 +/- 0.8 to 15.3 +/- 0.7 mmol/l: P
Notes
Erratum In: Diabetes Res Clin Pract 1995 Sep;29(3):215
PubMed ID
8529510 View in PubMed
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Acetaminophen prevents aging-associated hyperglycemia in aged rats: effect of aging-associated hyperactivation of p38-MAPK and ERK1/2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90253
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2009 Mar;25(3):279-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Wu Miaozong
Desai Devashish H
Kakarla Sunil K
Katta Anjaiah
Paturi Satyanarayana
Gutta Anil K
Rice Kevin M
Walker Ernest M
Blough Eric R
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755-1090, USA.
Source
Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2009 Mar;25(3):279-86
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - pharmacology
Aging - drug effects - physiology
Animals
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Enzyme Activation - drug effects
Glucose Transporter Type 4 - metabolism
Hyperglycemia - prevention & control
Liver - drug effects
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1 - metabolism
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3 - metabolism
Muscle, Skeletal - drug effects - physiology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Superoxides - metabolism
p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases - metabolism
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Aging-related hyperglycemia is associated with increased oxidative stress and diminished muscle glucose transporter-4 (Glut4) that may be regulated, at least in part, by the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). METHODS: To test the possibility that aging-related hyperglycemia can be prevented by pharmacological manipulation of MAPK hyperactivation, aged (27-month old) Fischer 344/NNiaHSD x Brown Norway/BiNia F1 (F344BN) rats were administered acetaminophen (30 mg/kg body weight/day) for 6 months in drinking water. RESULTS: Hepatic histopathology, serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase analyses suggested that chronic acetaminophen did not cause hepatotoxicity. Compared with adult (6-month) and aged (27-month) rats, very aged rats (33-month) had higher levels of blood glucose, phosphorylation of soleus p38-MAPK and extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), superoxide and oxidatively modified proteins (p
PubMed ID
19177471 View in PubMed
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Acute effect of alginate-based preload on satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate in healthy subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132787
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Morten Georg Jensen
Mette Kristensen
Anita Belza
Jes C Knudsen
Arne Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. mmgj@life.ku.dk
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alginates - therapeutic use
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Body mass index
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Energy Intake - drug effects - physiology
Female
Gastric Emptying - drug effects - physiology
Glucuronic Acid - therapeutic use
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hexuronic Acids - therapeutic use
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Postprandial Period
Reference Values
Satiation - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
Viscous dietary fibers such as sodium alginate extracted from brown seaweed have received much attention lately for their potential role in energy regulation through the inhibition of energy intake and increase of satiety feelings. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect on postprandial satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate (GER), by the paracetamol method, of two different volumes of an alginate-based preload in normal-weight subjects. In a four-way placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial, 20 subjects (age: 25.9 ± 3.4 years; BMI: 23.5 ± 1.7 kg/m(2)) were randomly assigned to receive a 3% preload concentration of either low volume (LV; 9.9 g alginate in 330 ml) or high volume (HV; 15.0 g alginate in 500 ml) alginate-based beverage, or an iso-volume placebo beverage. The preloads were ingested 30 min before a fixed breakfast and again before an ad libitum lunch. Consumption of LV-alginate preload induced a significantly lower (8.0%) energy intake than the placebo beverage (P = 0.040) at the following lunch meal, without differences in satiety feelings or paracetamol concentrations. The HV alginate significantly increased satiety feelings (P = 0.038), reduced hunger (P = 0.042) and the feeling of prospective food consumption (P = 0.027), and reduced area under the curve (iAUC) paracetamol concentrations compared to the placebo (P = 0.05). However, only a 5.5% reduction in energy intake was observed for HV alginate (P = 0.20). Although they are somewhat contradictory, our results suggest that alginate consumption does affect satiety feelings and energy intake. However, further investigation on the volume of alginate administered is needed before inferring that this fiber has a possible role in short-term energy regulation.
PubMed ID
21779093 View in PubMed
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Adherence to national diabetes guidelines through monitoring quality indicators--A comparison of three types of care for the elderly with special emphasis on HbA1c.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271560
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ann-Sofie Nilsson Neumark
Lars Brudin
Thomas Neumark
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Home Care Services
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Independent living
Male
Nursing Homes
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare adherence to Swedish guidelines for diabetes care between elderly people living at home with or without home health care, and residents of nursing homes.
Medical records of 277 elderly people aged 80 and older, with known diabetes in a Swedish municipality, were monitored using quality indicators to evaluate processes and outcomes.
Monitoring, in accordance to diabetes guidelines, of HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure and foot examinations was lower among residents of nursing homes (p
PubMed ID
25865853 View in PubMed
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Adiposity and glycemic control in children exposed to perfluorinated compounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104801
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Apr;99(4):E608-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Clara Amalie G Timmermann
Laura I Rossing
Anders Grøntved
Mathias Ried-Larsen
Christine Dalgård
Lars B Andersen
Philippe Grandjean
Flemming Nielsen
Kira D Svendsen
Thomas Scheike
Tina K Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine, Institute of Public Health (C.A.G.T., L.I.R., C.D., P.G., F.N., T.K.J.), and Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics (A.G., M.R.-L., L.B.A.), University of Southern Denmark, 5000 Odense C, Denmark; and Department of Biostatistics (K.D.S., T.S.), University of Copenhagen, 1353 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Apr;99(4):E608-14
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - drug effects - physiology
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Body mass index
Caprylates - blood
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood - toxicity
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Male
Obesity - blood - epidemiology
Skinfold thickness
Abstract
Our objective was to explore whether childhood exposure to perfluorinated and polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs), widely used stain- and grease-repellent chemicals, is associated with adiposity and markers of glycemic control.
Body mass index, skinfold thickness, waist circumference, leptin, adiponectin, insulin, glucose, and triglyceride concentrations were assessed in 8- to 10-year-old children in 1997 in a subset of the European Youth Heart Study, Danish component. Plasma PFC concentrations were available from 499 children. Linear regression models were performed to determine the association between PFC exposure and indicators of adiposity and markers of glycemic control.
There was no association between PFC exposures and adiposity or markers of glycemic control in normal-weight children. Among overweight children, an increase of 10 ng perfluorooctane sulfonic acid/mL plasma was associated with 16.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2%-28.3%) higher insulin concentration, 12.0% (95% CI, 2.4%-22.4%) higher ß-cell activity, 17.6% (95% CI, 5.8%-30.8%) higher insulin resistance, and 8.6% (95% CI, 1.2%-16.5%) higher triglyceride concentrations, and an increase of 10 ng perfluorooctanoic acid/mL plasma was associated with 71.6% (95% CI, 2.4%-187.5%) higher insulin concentration, 67.5% (95% CI, 5.5%-166.0%) higher ß-cell function, 73.9% (95% CI, 0.2%-202.0%) higher insulin resistance, and 76.2% (95% CI, 22.8%-153.0%) higher triglyceride concentrations.
Increased PFC exposure in overweight 8- to 10-year-old children was associated with higher insulin and triglyceride concentrations. Chance findings may explain some of our results, and due to the cross-sectional design, reverse causation cannot be excluded. The findings therefore need to be confirmed in longitudinal studies.
PubMed ID
24606078 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent metabolic effects of second-generation antipsychotics in second-generation antipsychotic-naïve French Canadian patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138355
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2010 Dec;20(6):479-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Geneviève Roy
Alain Bedard
Paul-André Desmarais
France Jourdain
Sylvie Allen
Danielle Michaud
Leila Ben Amor
Author Affiliation
CHAU Hotel Dieu de Levis, Department of Psychiatry, Laval University, Levis, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2010 Dec;20(6):479-87
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Body mass index
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Lipids - blood
Male
Metabolic Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Weight Gain - drug effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Patients receiving second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) may experience secondary metabolic effects such as weight gain, as well as changes in lipid and glucose metabolism. These effects are well documented in adults; however, fewer studies are available concerning their occurrence and their evolution in children and adolescents.
The aim of this study was to determine if there is an age-dependent variation in the metabolic effects of SGAs in a drug-naïve population.
Charts of 232 French Canadian patients participating in a program monitoring the metabolic effects of SGAs were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 85 SGA-naïve patients were selected, including 58 youths and 27 adults. Changes, relative to baseline, in weight, body mass index, lipid metabolism (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride), and fasting blood glucose were assessed, with follow-up at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months.
With respect to weight gain, in both the youth and adult groups, body mass index significantly increased from baseline at 3 months (10.1% [p?
PubMed ID
21186966 View in PubMed
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Alaskan wild berry resources and human health under the cloud of climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146583
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Apr 14;58(7):3884-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-2010
Author
Joshua Kellogg
Jinzhi Wang
Courtney Flint
David Ribnicky
Peter Kuhn
Elvira González De Mejia
Ilya Raskin
Mary Ann Lila
Author Affiliation
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA.
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Apr 14;58(7):3884-900
Date
Apr-14-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Anthocyanins - analysis - pharmacology
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Cell Line
Climate change
Fruit - chemistry
Health
Humans
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Obesity - drug therapy
Plant Extracts - analysis - metabolism - pharmacology
Random Allocation
Rosaceae - chemistry
Abstract
Wild berries are integral dietary components for Alaska Native people and a rich source of polyphenolic metabolites that can ameliorate metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. In this study, five species of wild Alaskan berries (Vaccinium ovalifolium , Vaccinium uliginosum , Rubus chamaemorus , Rubus spectabilis , and Empetrum nigrum) were screened for bioactivity through a community-participatory research method involving three geographically distinct tribal communities. Compositional analysis by HPLC and LC-MS(2) revealed substantial site-specific variation in anthocyanins (0.01-4.39 mg/g of FW) and proanthocyanidins (0.74-6.25 mg/g of FW) and identified A-type proanthocyanidin polymers. R. spectabilis increased expression levels of preadipocyte factor 1 (182%), and proanthocyanidin-enriched fractions from other species reduced lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Selected extracts reduced serum glucose levels in C57BL/6J mice by up to 45%. Local observations provided robust insights into effects of climatic fluctuations on berry abundance and quality, and preliminary site-specific compositional and bioactivity differences were noted, suggesting the need to monitor this Alaska Native resource as climate shifts affect the region.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20025229 View in PubMed
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All-cause mortality and pharmacological treatment intensity following a high risk screening program for diabetes. A 6.6 year follow-up of the ADDITION study, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124294
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2012 Oct;6(3):193-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Torsten Lauritzen
Annelli Sandbaek
Anders Helles Carlsen
Knut Borch-Johnsen
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, Department of General Practice, University of Aarhus, Denmark. tl@alm.au.dk
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2012 Oct;6(3):193-200
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Comorbidity
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Dyslipidemias - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To study all-cause mortality and pharmacological treatment intensity in relation to baseline glucose metabolism and HbA1c following high risk screening for diabetes in primary care.
Persons aged 40-69 years (N=163,185) received mailed diabetes risk questionnaires. 20,916 persons without diabetes but with high risk of diabetes were stratified by glucose metabolism (normal glucose tolerance (NGT), dysglycemia (IFG or IGT) or diabetes) and by HbA1c at screening (
Notes
Comment In: Prim Care Diabetes. 2012 Dec;6(4):341-222917774
PubMed ID
22595031 View in PubMed
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Associations between patient characteristics, social relations, diabetes management, quality of life, glycaemic control and emotional burden in type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277692
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2016 Feb;10(1):41-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Lene E Joensen
Thomas P Almdal
Ingrid Willaing
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2016 Feb;10(1):41-50
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Age Factors
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Electronic Health Records
Emotions
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Male
Patient Participation
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Self Care
Sex Factors
Social Behavior
Social Support
Surveys and Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The objective was to investigate associations between emotional burden and a number of individual variables: patient characteristics, social relations, diabetes management in everyday life, generic quality of life and glycaemic control, including determining to what extend these variables explain the differences in emotional burden in a large Danish population of people with type 1 diabetes.
We analysed a cross-sectional survey of 2419 Danish adults with type-1 diabetes mellitus and data from an electronic patient record. Data were analysed using hierarchical regression of factors of interest with emotional burden of diabetes as the dependent variable.
High emotional burden of diabetes was associated with being female, younger age, other chronic illness, low diabetes-specific support, low generic quality of life, low diabetes empowerment and high Hba1c. Low diabetes empowerment, low generic quality of life and low diabetes-specific support were associated with the largest difference in emotional burden level.
A variety of psychosocial and behavioural factors such as low social support, low generic quality of life and difficulties in managing diabetes are associated with high emotional burden in type-1 diabetes. These findings may call for an expansion of the effort to decrease the emotional burden of diabetes for those who are heavily burdened. Future research should explore the causality of the explored associations as well as potential subgroup differences in order to guide the development of appropriate interventions.
PubMed ID
26163949 View in PubMed
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90 records – page 1 of 9.