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1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273208
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Elizaveta Chabanova
Ehm Astrid Andersson
Johanne Dam Ohrt
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Henrik S Thomsen
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood
Fatty Liver - pathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Male
Muscles - pathology
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - blood - pathology
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Puberty
Sex Factors
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Abstract
This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children.
Fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years.
In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences of hepatic and muscular steatosis were 31% and 68%, respectively, whereas the prevalences in 40 lean children were 3% and 10%, respectively. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index z-score (BMI SDS), and pubertal development showed that the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 4.2 (95%CI: [1.8; 10.2], p = 0.0009) when hepatic steatosis was present. Comparing the simultaneous presence of hepatic and muscular steatosis with no presence of steatosis, the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 5.8 (95%CI: [2.0; 18.6], p = 0.002). No significant associations between muscle fat and dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, or blood pressure were observed. Liver and muscle fat, adjusted for age, sex, BMI SDS, and pubertal development, associated to BMI SDS and glycosylated hemoglobin, while only liver fat associated to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipid associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased cardiovascular disease risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26252778 View in PubMed
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A 3-year clinical follow-up of adult patients with 3243A>G in mitochondrial DNA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82145
Source
Neurology. 2006 May 23;66(10):1470-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-2006
Author
Majamaa-Voltti K A M
Winqvist S.
Remes A M
Tolonen U.
Pyhtinen J.
Uimonen S.
Kärppä M.
Sorri M.
Peuhkurinen K.
Majamaa K.
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. kirsi.majamaa-voltti@oulu.fi
Source
Neurology. 2006 May 23;66(10):1470-5
Date
May-23-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cognition Disorders - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - genetics
Disease Progression
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Electroencephalography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - genetics
Humans
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - genetics - ultrasonography
Lactates - blood
MELAS Syndrome - genetics - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mitochondria, Muscle - metabolism
Mosaicism
Neuropsychological Tests
Point Mutation
Pyruvates - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To follow the clinical course of patients with the mitochondrial DNA mutation 3243A>G for 3 years. METHODS: Thirty-three adult patients with the 3243A>G mutation entered a 3-year follow-up study. They were clinically evaluated annually, audiometry was performed, and samples were drawn for the analysis of blood chemistry and mutation heteroplasmy in leukocytes. Holter recording was performed three times during the follow-up and echocardiography, neuropsychological assessment, and quantitative EEG and brain imaging conducted at entry and after 3 years. RESULTS: The incidence of new neurologic events was low during the 3-year follow-up. Sensorineural hearing impairment (SNHI) progressed, left ventricular wall thickness increased, mean alpha frequency in the occipital and parietal regions decreased, and the severity of disease index (modified Rankin score) progressed significantly. The rate of SNHI progression correlated with mutation heteroplasmy in muscle. The increase in left ventricular wall thickness was seen almost exclusively in diabetic patients. Seven patients died during the follow-up, and they were generally more severely affected than those who survived. CONCLUSIONS: Significant changes in the severity of disease, sensorineural hearing impairment, left ventricular hypertrophy, and quantitative EEG were seen in adult patients with 3243A>G during the 3-year follow-up.
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2007 Jan 9;68(2):163-417210904
PubMed ID
16717204 View in PubMed
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Abnormal glucose regulation in patients with acute ST- elevation myocardial infarction-a cohort study on 224 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90209
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2009;8:6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Knudsen Eva C
Seljeflot Ingebjørg
Abdelnoor Michael
Eritsland Jan
Mangschau Arild
Arnesen Harald
Andersen Geir O
Author Affiliation
Center for Clinical Heart Research, Ullevål University Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. evacecilie.knudsen@ulleval.no
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2009;8:6
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diagnostic Tests, Routine
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Intolerance - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Unnecessary Procedures
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A high prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance and unknown type 2-diabetes in patients with coronary heart disease and no previous diagnosis of diabetes have been reported. The aims of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of abnormal glucose regulation (AGR) 3 months after an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients without known glucometabolic disturbance, to evaluate the reliability of a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) performed very early after an acute STEMI to predict the presence of AGR at 3 months, and to study other potential predictors measured in-hospital for AGR at 3 months. METHODS: This was an observational cohort study prospectively enrolling 224 STEMI patients treated with primary PCI. An OGTT was performed very early after an acute STEMI and was repeated in 200 patients after 3 months. We summarised the exact agreement observed, and assessed the observed reproducibility of the OGTTs performed in-hospital and at follow up. The patients were classified into glucometabolic categories defined according to the World Health Organisation criteria. AGR was defined as the sum of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2-diabetes. RESULTS: The prevalence of AGR at three months was 24.9% (95% CI 19.1, 31.4%), reduced from 46.9% (95% CI 40.2, 53.6) when measured in-hospital. Only, 108 of 201 (54%) patients remained in the same glucometabolic category after a repeated OGTT. High levels of HbA1c and admission plasma glucose in-hospital significantly predicted AGR at 3 months (p
PubMed ID
19183453 View in PubMed
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[Acceptance of new criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and associated conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244047
Source
Union Med Can. 1981 Nov;110(11):971-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1981

Accuracy of home blood glucose meters during hypoglycemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48242
Source
Diabetes Care. 1996 Dec;19(12):1412-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
Z. Trajanoski
G A Brunner
R J Gfrerer
P. Wach
T R Pieber
Author Affiliation
Department of Biophysics, Graz University of Technology, Austria. trajanoski@ibmt.tu-graz.ac.at
Source
Diabetes Care. 1996 Dec;19(12):1412-5
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring - instrumentation - standards
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood
Glucose Clamp Technique
Humans
Hypoglycemia - blood - diagnosis
Reference Standards
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy of home blood glucose meters during hypoglycemia. METHODS: Six blood glucose meters-One Touch II (LifeScan, Milpitas, CA), Companion II (Medisense, Cambridge, U.K.), Reflolux (Boehringer Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany), Accutrend (Boehringer Mannheim), Elite (Bayer, Munich, Germany), and HemoCue (HemoCue, Angelholm, Sweden)-were compared with a reference method (Beckman Glucose Analyzer 2). Glucose concentrations from arterialized venous blood samples were measured using all glucose meters (whole blood) and the reference method (plasma) during hypoglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps in 15 subjects. RESULTS: In total, 663 blood glucose monitor readings and 119 reference values ranging from 2.28 to 3.89 mmol/l were analyzed. The correlation coefficients and the percentage of measurements within 20% and outside 40% of the reference values for each glucose meter were as follows: One Touch II: 0.91, 99.2% and 0%; Companion II: 0.81, 88.2% and 2.5%; Reflolux: 0.78, 85.0% and 0.9%; Accutrend: 0.88, 46.0% and 6.6%; Elite: 0.78, 75.6% and 4.2%; and HemoCue: 0.93, 96.6% and 0% (P
Notes
Comment In: Diabetes Care. 1997 Jul;20(7):1204-5; author reply 1206-79203465
Comment In: Diabetes Care. 1997 Jul;20(7):1205-79203466
PubMed ID
8941473 View in PubMed
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Acoustic-reflex responses in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48476
Source
Am J Otolaryngol. 1994 Mar-Apr;15(2):109-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Virtaniemi
M. Laakso
J. Nuutinen
S. Karjalainen
E. Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Am J Otolaryngol. 1994 Mar-Apr;15(2):109-13
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Impedance Tests
Adult
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Autonomic Nervous System - physiology
Autonomic Nervous System Diseases - physiopathology
Blood Glucose - analysis
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - drug therapy - metabolism - physiopathology
Diabetic Angiopathies - physiopathology
Diabetic Neuropathies - physiopathology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem - physiology
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Male
Reaction Time - physiology
Reflex, Acoustic - physiology
Reflex, Stretch - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) are especially susceptible to microangiopathic complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Microangiopathic changes are also the most important findings in histopathologic studies of the inner ear and central nervous systems in diabetic subjects. No previous studies have measured acoustic-reflex latencies (ARL) or amplitudes (ARA) in patients with IDDM. ARL and ARA reflect the function of the acoustic-reflex arch. Furthermore, possible changes in the tympanic membrane, ossicular chain, and stapedius muscle may affect the shape of acoustic-reflex. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Acoustic-reflex thresholds, latencies, and amplitudes were studied in 53 patients with IDDM and 42 randomly selected nondiabetic control subjects, aged between 20 and 40 years, using the Madsen Model ZO 73 Impedance Bridge (Madsen Electronics, Copenhagen, Denmark). Subjects with an abnormal tympanic membrane, conductive hearing loss, and known cause for hearing impairment eg, noise damage, were excluded from the study. RESULTS: There were no differences between control and diabetic subjects in the contralateral acoustic-reflex thresholds. In contrast, patients with IDDM had longer ARLs and decreased ARAs compared with those of control subjects. ARA amplitude had linear correlation with the amplitude of tympanogram, whereas ARL had no linear correlation with auditory brainstem latencies in the same study subjects. Acoustic-reflex responses in insulin-dependent diabetic patients were not associated with the duration of diabetes, metabolic control, microangiopathy, or neuropathy. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged ARLs and decreased ARAs in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes are probably caused more by the stiff middle ear system than disturbances in the brainstem.
PubMed ID
8179101 View in PubMed
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The ADDITION study: proposed trial of the cost-effectiveness of an intensive multifactorial intervention on morbidity and mortality among people with Type 2 diabetes detected by screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47804
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Sep;24 Suppl 3:S6-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
T. Lauritzen
S. Griffin
K. Borch-Johnsen
N J Wareham
B H Wolffenbuttel
G. Rutten
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Sep;24 Suppl 3:S6-11
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology - therapy
England - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hyperglycemia - complications - economics - therapy
Intervention Studies
Male
Mass Screening - economics
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies
Netherlands - epidemiology
Practice Guidelines
Prevalence
Primary Health Care - economics
Randomized Controlled Trials - methods
Risk factors
Vascular Diseases - etiology - mortality - therapy
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The overall aims of the ADDITION study are to evaluate whether screening for prevalent undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes is feasible, and whether subsequent optimised intensive treatment of diabetes, and associated risk factors, is feasible and beneficial. DESIGN: Population-based screening in three European countries followed by an open, randomised controlled trial. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: People aged 40-69 y in the community, without known diabetes, will be offered a random capillary blood glucose screening test by their primary care physicians, followed, if equal to or greater than 5.5 mmol/l, by fasting and 2-h post-glucose-challenge blood glucose measurements. Three thousand newly diagnosed patients will subsequently receive conventional treatment (according to current national guidelines) or intensive multifactorial treatment (lifestyle advice, prescription of aspirin and ACE-inhibitors, in addition to protocol-driven tight control of blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol). Patients allocated to intensive treatment will be further randomised to centre-specific interventions to motivate adherence to lifestyle changes and medication. Duration of follow-up is planned for 5 y. Endpoints will include mortality, macrovascular and microvascular complications, patient health status and satisfaction, process-of-care indicators and costs.
PubMed ID
11063279 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue cellularity--metabolic aspects. The population study of women in Göteborg 1974-1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48984
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1979;206(6):501-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
H. Noppa
C. Bengtsson
B. Isaksson
U. Smith
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1979;206(6):501-6
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - cytology - pathology
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body Composition
Cell Count
Coronary Disease - blood - pathology
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - pathology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - blood - pathology
Lipids - blood
Middle Aged
Risk
Sweden
Uric Acid - blood
Abstract
A representative population sample of middle-aged women was studied in 1974-75. In a subsample, body composition and adipose tissue cellularity variables were determined and individuals with a particular clinical disorder were compared with the total subsample. Women with diabetes mellitus had more body fat and higher fat cell weights and larger fat cell members, whereas these variables did not differ in women with IHD or hypertension compared with the total subsample. Total body fat correlated with arterial BPs, fasting blood glucose, serum lipids and serum uric acid. The correlations were stronger than those reported previously by us between weight index and these variables. In univariate analyses, fat cell weight correlated with systolic BP, serum triglycerides and serum uric acid, and fat cell number with diastolic BP, fasting blood glucose and serum uric acid. In multivariate analyses, when due allowance was made for total body fat, the correlations between these variables and fat cell weight or fat cell number did not reach statistical significance.
PubMed ID
532712 View in PubMed
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Admission blood glucose and short term survival in primary intracerebral haemorrhage: a population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176129
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2005 Mar;76(3):349-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
R. Fogelholm
K. Murros
A. Rissanen
S. Avikainen
Author Affiliation
Pappilantie 10 B 8, 02400 Kirkkonummi, Finland. r.fogel@kolumbus.fi
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2005 Mar;76(3):349-53
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cerebral Hemorrhage - mortality - pathology
Diabetes Complications - mortality - pathology
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The role of admission blood glucose level on the prognosis of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage has not been elucidated.
To examine this association on the basis of an epidemiologically representative patient material.
249 500 people living in the catchment area of the Central Hospital of Central Finland. The diagnosis of ICH was established if verified by cranial computed tomography (CT) or autopsy.
Of the 416 patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria, 30 died before admission and 386 were admitted to the Central Hospital. All 329 patients (290 nondiabetics and 39 diabetics) with both admission blood glucose and cranial CT data were included in the study. The mean blood glucose level was 10.6 mmol/l for nondiabetics who died on the day of onset, 8.6 mmol/l for those dying during days 1 to 28, and 6.8 mmol/l for the 28 day survivors. The corresponding figures for diabetics were 13.9 mmol/l, 12.5 mmol/l, and 9.3 mmol/l. In both nondiabetics and diabetics, patients who died had significantly higher mean glucose than the 28 day survivors (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
15716524 View in PubMed
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632 records – page 1 of 64.