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79 records – page 1 of 8.

Source
Br Med J. 1964 Jan 4;5374:19-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-1964

[Acid-base state of blood in pregnant rats after application of lead acetate]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89837
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2008 Sep-Oct;80(5):112-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tkachenko T A
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2008 Sep-Oct;80(5):112-6
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acid-Base Equilibrium - drug effects
Acidosis - blood - etiology - metabolism
Animals
Anoxia - blood - etiology - metabolism
Blood Gas Analysis
Female
Lead Poisoning - blood - complications - metabolism
Liver - embryology - metabolism
Organometallic Compounds - blood - pharmacokinetics - poisoning
Placenta - metabolism
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - blood - metabolism
Rats
Abstract
It was shown that the increase of lead content in the blood, liver, placenta of female rats, rat embryo and embryo's liver (by 80.4; 30.9; 26.8; 18.2 and 22.7%, respectively) of rats poisoned by lead causes pH decrease in blood, reduction of HCO3- concentration, content of general CO2, level of pCO2 and pO2, that evidences for development of subcompensated metabolic acidosis. It was determined, that the poisoning of pregnant rats causes deep metabolic acidosis and hypoxia in their organisms that can result in the prenatal death of fetus.
PubMed ID
19248624 View in PubMed
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Acute acetylsalicylic acid poisoning: treatment with forced alkaline diuresis and diuretics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249506
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1977 Oct 14;12(2):111-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-14-1977
Author
K J Berg
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1977 Oct 14;12(2):111-6
Date
Oct-14-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acid-Base Equilibrium
Adolescent
Adult
Aspirin - poisoning
Barbiturates - poisoning
Blood Gas Analysis
Bumetanide - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Clinical Trials as Topic
Diuresis
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Female
Furosemide - therapeutic use
Gastric Lavage
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Male
Potassium - blood
Salicylates - blood
Abstract
101 patients were treated for acute acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) poisoning in the Nephrological Unit Trondheim between 1971-1975. On admission 33 of them had a serum salicylic acid (SA) concentration greater than 400 microgram/ml (mean 588 +/- 40 microgram/ml). This group was compared with a group of 11 children less than 5 years old with ASA poisoning and a mean serum SA on admission of 550 +/- 34 microgram/ml. Blood pH on admission was normal or elevated in all patients more than 12 years old (mean 7.43 +/- 0.01), whereas 7 of the 11 children suffered from metabolic acidosis. The results of forced alkaline diuresis produced by loop diuretics (bumetanide, furosemide) in ASA poisoned patients older than 12 years are reported. The mean T 1/2 of SA was 9.6 h in the treated group as compared to 18-22 h in untreated patients. There was no apparent difference between the diuretic effect of bumetanide and furosemide.
PubMed ID
21797 View in PubMed
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Admission base deficit and lactate levels in Canadian patients with blunt trauma: are they useful markers of mortality?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123467
Source
J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2012 Jun;72(6):1532-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Jean-Francois Ouellet
Derek J Roberts
Corina Tiruta
Andrew W Kirkpatrick
Michelle Mercado
Vincent Trottier
Elijah Dixon
David V Feliciano
Chad G Ball
Author Affiliation
Regional Trauma Services, Department of Surgery University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2012 Jun;72(6):1532-5
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acid-Base Imbalance - blood - mortality
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers - analysis
Blood Gas Analysis
Cohort Studies
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - methods
Female
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Lactic Acid - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Statistics, nonparametric
Survival Analysis
Trauma Centers
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - blood - diagnosis - mortality
Abstract
Elevated base deficit (BD) and lactate levels at admission in patients with injury have been shown to be associated with increased mortality. This relationship is undefined in the Canadian experience. The goal of this study was to define the association between arterial blood gas (ABG) values at admission and mortality for Canadians with severe blunt injury.
A retrospective review of 3,000 consecutive adult major trauma admissions (Injury Severity Score, = 12) to a Canadian academic tertiary care referral center was performed. ABG values at the time of arrival were analyzed with respect to associated mortality and length of stay.
A total of 2,269 patients (76%) had complete data available for analysis. After exclusion of patients who sustained a penetrating injury or were admitted for minor falls (ground levels or low height), 445 had an ABG drawn within 2 hours of arrival. Patients who died displayed a higher median lactate (3.6 vs. 2.2, p
PubMed ID
22695417 View in PubMed
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[An analysis of using the graphic monitoring of ventilation for an optimal choice of respiratory management parameters in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63317
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2004 Jul-Aug;(4):59-63
Publication Type
Article
Author
A I Gritsan
A P Kolesnichenko
A Iu Skorobogatov
G V Gritsan
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2004 Jul-Aug;(4):59-63
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Gas Analysis
Eclampsia - complications
English Abstract
Female
Genital Diseases, Female - complications
Humans
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Pre-Eclampsia - complications
Pregnancy
Respiration, Artificial - instrumentation - methods
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult - therapy
Shock, Septic - complications
Ventilators, Mechanical
Abstract
The potentialities of graphic ventilation monitoring (graphic monitor "Servo Screen 390", Siemens Elema, Sweden) were analyzed for optimizing the respiratory management parameters in 48 obstetric and gynecology patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The ventilation loops and curves, ALV parameters, mechanical lung properties, gas blood composition and gas indices were dynamically evaluated during examination stages. The graphic ventilation monitoring, when used for respiratory management in patients with ARDS, provides for optimizing, in the real time mode, the PEEP and Vt levels, which is in line with the AVL "safety" concept.
PubMed ID
15468562 View in PubMed
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Arterial blood gas tensions after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: associations with long-term neurologic outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104931
Source
Crit Care Med. 2014 Jun;42(6):1463-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Jukka Vaahersalo
Stepani Bendel
Matti Reinikainen
Jouni Kurola
Marjaana Tiainen
Rahul Raj
Ville Pettilä
Tero Varpula
Markus B Skrifvars
Author Affiliation
1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. 2Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. 3Department of Intensive Care, North Karelia Central Hospital, Joensuu, Finland. 4Centre for Prehospital Emergency Care, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. 5Department of Neurology, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Crit Care Med. 2014 Jun;42(6):1463-70
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Gas Analysis - methods
Carbon Dioxide - blood
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Hospitals, Public
Hospitals, University
Humans
Hypercapnia - etiology
Intensive Care Units
Male
Middle Aged
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - blood - complications - therapy
Oxygen - blood
Prospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Optimal oxygen and carbon dioxide levels during postcardiac arrest care are currently undefined and observational studies have suggested harm from hyperoxia exposure. We aimed to assess whether mean and time-weighted oxygen and carbon dioxide levels during the first 24 hours of postcardiac arrest care correlate with 12-month neurologic outcome.
Prospective observational cohort study.
Twenty-one ICUs in Finland.
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated in ICUs in Finland between March 2010 and February 2011.
None.
Arterial blood PaO2 and PaCO2 during the first 24 hours from admission were divided into predefined categories from the lowest to the highest. Proportions of time spent in different categories and the mean PaO2 and PaCO2 values during the first 24 hours were included in separate multivariable regression models along with resuscitation factors. The cerebral performance category at 12 months was used as primary endpoint. A total of 409 patients with arterial blood gases analyzed at least once and with a complete set of resuscitation data were included. The average amount of PaO2 and PaCO2 measurements was eight per patient. The mean 24 hours PaCO2 level was an independent predictor of good outcome (odds ratio, 1.054; 95% CI, 1.006-1.104; p = 0.027) but the mean PaO2 value was not (odds ratio, 1.006; 95% CI, 0.998-1.014; p = 0.149). With multivariate regression analysis, time spent in the PaCO2 band higher than 45 mm Hg was associated with good outcome (odds ratio, 1.015; 95% CI, 1.002-1.029; p = 0.024, for each percentage point increase in time) but time spent in different oxygen categories were not.
In this multicenter study, hypercapnia was associated with good 12-month outcome in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We were unable to verify any harm from hyperoxia exposure. Further trials should focus on whether moderate hypercapnia during postcardiac arrest care improves outcome.
Notes
Comment In: Crit Care Med. 2014 Jun;42(6):1561-224836799
PubMed ID
24557423 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blood gases and hypothermia: some theoretical and practical considerations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57284
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest Suppl. 1996;224:21-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
J. Kofstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest Suppl. 1996;224:21-6
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood Gas Analysis
Carbon Dioxide - analysis - blood
Comparative Study
Humans
Hypothermia - blood
Oxygen - analysis - blood
Abstract
There is much controversy about the optimal bloodgas management of hypothermic patients, whether the hypothermia is caused by accidents or induced before operations. The surgeons and anestesiologists have acquired more clinical experience the last years when operating patients in hypothermia. The comparative physiology has given increased information about the blood gas strategy of heterothermic endotherms and poikilothermic ectotherms during lowering of their core temperature. There are two types of strategies which have been used in clinical medicine the last years in the blood gas management of patients in hypothermia: pH-stat method and alpha-stat method. In the pH-stat method, the arterial carbon dioxide tension (pCO2(a)) is maintained at 5.3 kPa (40 mmHg) and the pH is maintained at 7.40 when measured at the actual temperature. It is then necessary to add CO2 to the inspired gas. In the alpha-method, the arterial carbon dioxide tension and the pH are maintained at 5.3 kPa and 7.40 when measured at +37 degrees C. When a patient is cooled down, the pH-value will increase and the pCO2-value and the pO2-value will decrease with lowering of the temperature if measured at the patients temperature. Both the pH-stat and alpha-stat strategies have theoretical disadvantages. For the optimal myocardial function the alpha-stat method is the method of choice. The pH-stat method may result in loss of autoregulation in the brain (coupling of the cerebral blood flow with the metabolic rate in the brain). By increasing the cerebral blood flow beyond the metabolic requirements, the pH-stat method may lead to cerebral microembolisation and intracranial hypertension. In Norway the alpha-stat strategy is the preferred method.
PubMed ID
8865418 View in PubMed
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79 records – page 1 of 8.