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Absent post-ischemic increase of blood flowmotion in the cutaneous microcirculation of healthy chronic cigarette smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78655
Source
Clin Hemorheol Microcirc. 2007;36(2):163-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Rossi M.
Carpi A.
Di Maria C.
Galetta F.
Santoro G.
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa, Italy. mrossi@int.med.unipi.it
Source
Clin Hemorheol Microcirc. 2007;36(2):163-71
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Flow Velocity - drug effects - physiology
Female
Forearm - blood supply
Hemorheology - drug effects
Humans
Ischemia - physiopathology
Laser-Doppler Flowmetry
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Microcirculation - drug effects
Middle Aged
Regional Blood Flow
Skin - blood supply
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate whether chronic cigarette smoke habit is associated with changes of laser Doppler (LD) skin blood flowmotion (SBF). We performed spectral analysis of skin forearm LD signal detected by a LD flowmetry (Periflux PF4, Perimed, Sweden) before and during forearm post-ischemic hyperaemia, in 14 healthy chronic smoker subjects and 14 age and sex matched nonsmoker subjects. Forearm skin ischemia was obtained by a pneumatic cuff, positioned at the right arm and inflated for 3 minutes to 30 mmHg above systolic blood pressure. Power spectral density (PSD) of the SBF total spectrum (0.009-1.6 Hz), as well as 0.009-0.02 Hz , 0.02-0.06 Hz, 0.06-0.2 Hz, 0.2-0.6 Hz and 0.6-1.6 Hz frequency intervals (FI), referred to endothelial, sympathetic, myogenic, respiratory and heart activity, respectively, were measured in LD conventional perfusion units (PU)/Hz. Smokers showed a basal SBF total spectrum PSD mean values not significantly different from nonsmokers (2.14+/-1.58 PU/Hz and 1.93+/-1.35 PU/Hz, respectively). Following ischemia, PSD mean value of SBF total spectrum, as well of five FI considered, significantly increased in nonsmokers (p
PubMed ID
17325440 View in PubMed
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Acute administration of a single dose of valsartan improves left ventricular functions: a pilot study to assess the role of tissue velocity echocardiography in patients with systemic arterial hypertension in the TVE-valsartan study I.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80206
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2006 Nov;26(6):351-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Govind Satish C
Brodin Lars-Ake
Nowak Jacek
Ramesh S S
Saha Samir K
Author Affiliation
BMJ Heart Center, Department of Non-invasive Cardiology, Bangalore, India.
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2006 Nov;26(6):351-6
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage
Blood Flow Velocity - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Echocardiography, Doppler, Color
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Contraction - drug effects
Pilot Projects
Research Design
Stroke Volume - drug effects
Sweden
Tetrazoles - administration & dosage
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Valine - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Ventricular Function, Left - drug effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The advent of colour-coded tissue velocity echocardiography (TVE) has now made it possible to quantify left ventricular (LV) functions in patients with systemic arterial hypertension (HTN). Hypothesis In this project, we have studied the cardiac effects of a single dose of orally administered valsartan in patients with known HTN. METHODS: Fifty-five patients with HTN with a mean age of 56 +/- 10 years were given an early morning dose of 80 mg valsartan withholding regular antihypertensive medications on the day of investigation. TVE images, acquired on VIVID systems were digitized for postprocessing of longitudinal and radial peak systolic velocities, strain rate, and systolic and diastolic time intervals before (pre) and 5 h after (post) administration of the drug. RESULTS: Blood pressure (mmHg) pre and post, respectively, were 147 +/- 15 versus 137 +/- 14 systolic and 90 +/- 7 versus 86 +/- 7 diastolic (all P
PubMed ID
17042901 View in PubMed
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The acute dose-dependent effects of ethanol on canine myocardial perfusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11527
Source
Alcohol. 1994 Sep-Oct;11(5):351-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
R V Kettunen
J. Timisjärvi
J. Heikkilä
P. Saukko
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Alcohol. 1994 Sep-Oct;11(5):351-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood Flow Velocity
Coronary Circulation - drug effects
Dogs
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethanol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Microspheres
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vascular Resistance - drug effects
Ventricular Function, Left - drug effects
Abstract
The acute effects of ethanol (1.0 g/kg and 1.5 g/kg, n = 4 and n = 5, yielding blood concentrations of 1.3 +/- 0.2 mg/ml and 2.4 +/- 0.3 mg/ml) on myocardial perfusion were studied in anesthetized, thoracotomized, artificially ventilated dogs by using a radioactive microsphere technique. The control group (n = 5) received saline. The smaller dose of ethanol decreased perfusion in the left ventricular myocardium from 0.737 +/- 0.122 to 0.555 +/- 0.122 ml/g/min (NS), whereas the greater dose nonsignificantly increased it, from 0.744 +/- 0.115 to 0.819 +/- 0.119 ml/g/min (p
PubMed ID
7818790 View in PubMed
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[Angiotensin converting enzyme, NO-synthase, and endothelin-1 genes and left ventricular hypertrophy in natives of Yakutia with hypertensive disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176274
Source
Kardiologiia. 2005;45(1):41-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
L O Minushkina
I R Petrova
T A Romanova
V V Antipina
E R Makarova
D A Zateishikov
V V Nosikov
B A Sidorenko
Source
Kardiologiia. 2005;45(1):41-4
Date
2005
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alanine
Asparagine
Blood Flow Velocity
Endothelin-1 - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Glycine
Humans
Hypertension - complications - enzymology - genetics - pathology - physiopathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - enzymology - genetics - pathology - physiopathology
Lysine
Male
Middle Aged
Mitral Valve
Nitric Oxide Synthase - genetics
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Russia
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Association of polymorphic markers G7831A of ACE gene, Lys198Asn of endothelin-1 (EDN1) gene, and 4a/4b of NOS3 gene with characteristics of structure and function of the left ventricle was studied in 70 (31 men and 39 women) natives of Yakutia with hypertension. Mean age of patients was 48.3+/-0.74 years, duration of hypertension -- 12.4+/-0.99 years; 60 (85.7%), 7 (10%) and 3 (4.3%) patients had III, II and I degree of hypertension, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction was used for identification of alleles of polymorphic markers G7831A of ACE gene, Lys198Asn of EDN1 gene, and 4a/4b of NOS3 gene. Polymorphic marker G7831A of ACE gene was not associated with severity of hypertrophy of left ventricular myocardium as well as with state of systolic and diastolic left ventricular function. Patients with allele Asn of EDN1 gene in the genotype had significantly lower value of peak A integral of trans-mitral blood flow. Patients with allele 4a of NOS3 gene had thicker left ventricular walls, greater left ventricular myocardial mass and mass index.
PubMed ID
15699938 View in PubMed
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Are left ventricular mass, geometry and function related to vascular changes and/or insulin resistance in long-standing hypertension? ICARUS: a LIFE substudy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53541
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2003 May;17(5):305-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
M H Olsen
E. Hjerkinn
K. Wachtell
A. Høieggen
J N Bella
S D Nesbitt
E. Fossum
S E Kjeldsen
S. Julius
H. Ibsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Glostrup University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. mho@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2003 May;17(5):305-11
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Flow Velocity - physiology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood Pressure - physiology
Carotid Artery, Common - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Denmark
Diastole - physiology
Echocardiography
Female
Heart Ventricles - metabolism - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Humans
Hypertension - metabolism - physiopathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - metabolism - physiopathology
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Statistics
Stroke Volume - physiology
Systole - physiology
United States
Vascular Resistance - physiology
Ventricular Function, Left - physiology
Ventricular Remodeling - physiology
Abstract
Vascular hypertrophy and insulin resistance have been associated with abnormal left ventricular (LV) geometry in population studies. We wanted to investigate the influence of vascular hypertrophy and insulin resistance on LV hypertrophy and its function in patients with hypertension. In 89 patients with essential hypertension and electrocardiographic LV hypertrophy, we measured blood pressure; insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinaemic euglucaemic clamp; minimal forearm vascular resistance (MFVR) by plethysmography; intima-media cross-sectional area of the common carotid arteries (IMA) by ultrasound; and LV mass, relative wall thickness (RWT), systolic function and diastolic filling by echocardiography after two weeks of placebo treatment. LV mass index correlated to IMA/height (r=0.36, P=0.001), serum insulin (r=-0.25, P
Notes
Comment In: J Hum Hypertens. 2003 May;17(5):299-30412756401
PubMed ID
12756402 View in PubMed
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Arterial stiffness, pressure and flow pulsatility and brain structure and function: the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129735
Source
Brain. 2011 Nov;134(Pt 11):3398-407
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Gary F Mitchell
Mark A van Buchem
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
John D Gotal
Maria K Jonsdottir
Ólafur Kjartansson
Melissa Garcia
Thor Aspelund
Tamara B Harris
Vilmundur Gudnason
Lenore J Launer
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Engineering, Inc., Norwood, MA 02062, USA. garyfmitchell@mindspring.com
Source
Brain. 2011 Nov;134(Pt 11):3398-407
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aorta - physiopathology
Blood Flow Velocity - physiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Brain - blood supply - pathology - physiopathology
Cardiovascular Diseases - pathology - physiopathology
Carotid Arteries - physiopathology
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Iceland
Male
Prospective Studies
Pulsatile Flow - physiology
Risk factors
Vascular Stiffness - physiology
Abstract
Aortic stiffness increases with age and vascular risk factor exposure and is associated with increased risk for structural and functional abnormalities in the brain. High ambient flow and low impedance are thought to sensitize the cerebral microcirculation to harmful effects of excessive pressure and flow pulsatility. However, haemodynamic mechanisms contributing to structural brain lesions and cognitive impairment in the presence of high aortic stiffness remain unclear. We hypothesized that disproportionate stiffening of the proximal aorta as compared with the carotid arteries reduces wave reflection at this important interface and thereby facilitates transmission of excessive pulsatile energy into the cerebral microcirculation, leading to microvascular damage and impaired function. To assess this hypothesis, we evaluated carotid pressure and flow, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, brain magnetic resonance images and cognitive scores in participants in the community-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study who had no history of stroke, transient ischaemic attack or dementia (n = 668, 378 females, 69-93 years of age). Aortic characteristic impedance was assessed in a random subset (n = 422) and the reflection coefficient at the aorta-carotid interface was computed. Carotid flow pulsatility index was negatively related to the aorta-carotid reflection coefficient (R = -0.66, P
Notes
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PubMed ID
22075523 View in PubMed
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Assessment of cerebral autoregulation: the quandary of quantification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122399
Source
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2012 Sep 15;303(6):H658-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2012
Author
Y C Tzeng
P N Ainslie
W H Cooke
K C Peebles
C K Willie
B A MacRae
J D Smirl
H M Horsman
C A Rickards
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Systems Laboratory, University of Otago, Wellington South, New Zealand. shieak.tzeng@otago.ac.nz
Source
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2012 Sep 15;303(6):H658-71
Date
Sep-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Flow Velocity
Blood pressure
British Columbia
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Exercise
Female
Fourier Analysis
Heart rate
Homeostasis
Humans
Hypercapnia - physiopathology
Hypocapnia - physiopathology
Linear Models
Male
Middle Cerebral Artery - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Models, Cardiovascular
New Zealand
Observer Variation
Prospective Studies
Regional Blood Flow
Reproducibility of Results
Respiration
Retrospective Studies
Supine Position
Texas
Tourniquets
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Pulsed
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial
Young Adult
Abstract
We assessed the convergent validity of commonly applied metrics of cerebral autoregulation (CA) to determine the extent to which the metrics can be used interchangeably. To examine between-subject relationships among low-frequency (LF; 0.07-0.2 Hz) and very-low-frequency (VLF; 0.02-0.07 Hz) transfer function coherence, phase, gain, and normalized gain, we performed retrospective transfer function analysis on spontaneous blood pressure and middle cerebral artery blood velocity recordings from 105 individuals. We characterized the relationships (n = 29) among spontaneous transfer function metrics and the rate of regulation index and autoregulatory index derived from bilateral thigh-cuff deflation tests. In addition, we analyzed data from subjects (n = 29) who underwent a repeated squat-to-stand protocol to determine the relationships between transfer function metrics during forced blood pressure fluctuations. Finally, data from subjects (n = 16) who underwent step changes in end-tidal P(CO2) (P(ET)(CO2) were analyzed to determine whether transfer function metrics could reliably track the modulation of CA within individuals. CA metrics were generally unrelated or showed only weak to moderate correlations. Changes in P(ET)(CO2) were positively related to coherence [LF: ß = 0.0065 arbitrary units (AU)/mmHg and VLF: ß = 0.011 AU/mmHg, both P
PubMed ID
22821992 View in PubMed
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Assessment of left ventricular function using mitral annular velocities in patients with congestive heart failure with or without the presence of significant mitral regurgitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53588
Source
J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2003 Mar;16(3):240-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Mahbubul Alam
Johan Wardell
Eva Andersson
Rolf Nordlander
Bassem Samad
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Karolinska Institute at South Hospital, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden. mahbubul.alam@medklin.sos.sll.se
Source
J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2003 Mar;16(3):240-5
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Flow Velocity - physiology
Comparative Study
Echocardiography, Doppler
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - complications - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Mitral Valve - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Mitral Valve Insufficiency - complications - physiopathology
Myocardial Contraction - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics
Stroke Volume - physiology
Sweden
Tricuspid Valve - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - physiopathology
Ventricular Function, Left - physiology
Abstract
Myocardial velocities in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) were studied using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging. Velocities were recorded at the mitral and tricuspid annulus. Four sites at the mitral annuli were selected corresponding to the septal, lateral, inferior, and anterior walls of the left ventricle from apical 4- and 2-chamber views. A mean value from the above 4 sites was selected to describe the mitral annular velocities. Only one site of the tricuspid annulus was selected, corresponding to the right ventricular free wall. Three different annular velocities were recorded: the peak systolic, and the peak early and late diastolic velocities. A total of 96 patients were compared with 12 age-matched healthy participants. Patients with CHF had significantly decreased mitral and tricuspid systolic velocities compared with healthy participants (4.9 vs 9.3 cm/s, P
PubMed ID
12618732 View in PubMed
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Assessment of liver function in primary biliary cirrhosis using Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140343
Source
HPB (Oxford). 2010 Oct;12(8):567-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Henrik Nilsson
Lennart Blomqvist
Lena Douglas
Anders Nordell
Eduard Jonas
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. henrik.nilsson@ki.se
Source
HPB (Oxford). 2010 Oct;12(8):567-76
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Flow Velocity
Case-Control Studies
Contrast Media - diagnostic use
Female
Gadolinium DTPA - diagnostic use
Humans
Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Liver - blood supply - physiopathology
Liver Circulation
Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary - diagnosis - physiopathology
Liver Function Tests
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Perfusion Imaging
Predictive value of tests
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Gd-EOB-DTPA (gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) is a gadolinium-based hepatocyte-specific contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to determine whether the hepatic uptake and excretion of Gd-EOB-DTPA differ between patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and healthy controls, and whether differences could be quantified.
Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI was performed in 20 healthy volunteers and 12 patients with PBC. The uptake of Gd-EOB-DTPA was assessed using traditional semi-quantitative parameters (C(max) , T(max) and T(1/2) ), as well as model-free parameters derived after deconvolutional analysis (hepatic extraction fraction [HEF], input-relative blood flow [irBF] and mean transit time [MTT]). In each individual, all parameters were calculated for each liver segment and the median of the segmental values was used to define a global liver median (GLM).
Although the PBC patients had relatively mild disease according to their Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD), Child-Pugh and Mayo risk scores, they had significantly lower HEF and shorter MTT values compared with the healthy controls. These differences significantly increased with increasing MELD and Child-Pugh scores.
Dynamic hepatocyte-specific contrast-enhanced MRI (DHCE-MRI) has a potential role as an imaging-based liver function test. The high spatial resolution of MRI enables hepatic function to be assessed on segmental and sub-segmental levels.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20887325 View in PubMed
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Association of cardio-ankle vascular index with physical fitness and cognitive symptoms in aging Finnish firefighters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132690
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2012 May;85(4):397-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
H. Lindholm
A. Punakallio
S. Lusa
M. Sainio
E. Ponocny
R. Winker
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41a A, 00250, Helsinki, Finland. harri.lindholm@ttl.fi
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2012 May;85(4):397-403
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Ankle - blood supply
Ankle Brachial Index
Atherosclerosis - diagnosis - physiopathology
Blood Flow Velocity
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology
Finland
Firefighters
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness - physiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Vascular Stiffness - physiology
Abstract
Monitoring cardiovascular risk factors is important in health promotion among firefighters. The assessment of arterial stiffness (AS) may help to detect early signs of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to analyze associations between aerobic fitness, cognitive symptoms and cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) as a measure for AS among Finnish firefighters.
The data are one part of a large 13-year follow-up study of the health and physical and mental capacity of Finnish professional firefighters. The subjects in this substudy comprised 65 male firefighters of a mean age of 48.0 (42-58) years in 2009. Their maximal oxygen uptake was successfully measured in two cross-sectional studies in 1996 and 2009, and they responded to questionnaires at both sessions, and their CAVI was measured in 2009. CAVI was calculated from the pulse waveform signal and pulse wave velocity. The lifestyle habits and subjective cognitive stress-related symptoms were collected via a standardized questionnaire. Muscular fitness was measured by the routine test battery used for Finnish firefighters.
CAVI was related to age. About one-fifth of the firefighters had a CAVI of >8. Aerobic fitness was the main physiological factor correlating with increased CAVI. Interestingly, VO(2)max and the accelerated decrease in VO(2)max during a 13-year follow-up were associated with signs of impaired vascular function. The cognitive symptoms derived from the Profile of Mood States questionnaire (POMS) were mainly associated with stress and sleeping difficulties. No clear association with physical fitness was found in this population of fit firefighters.
Among firefighters, the decrease in aerobic fitness predicts increased arterial stiffness. The speed of the age-related decline in maximal oxygen consumption is as important as absolute level. Against expectations, the cognitive function did not correlate with vascular health parameters. The cognitive symptoms, however, were only mild.
PubMed ID
21789686 View in PubMed
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190 records – page 1 of 19.