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ABO Blood Group and Risk of Thromboembolic and Arterial Disease: A Study of 1.5 Million Blood Donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275912
Source
Circulation. 2016 Apr 12;133(15):1449-57; discussion 1457
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2016
Author
Senthil K Vasan
Klaus Rostgaard
Ammar Majeed
Henrik Ullum
Kjell-Einar Titlestad
Ole B V Pedersen
Christian Erikstrup
Kaspar Rene Nielsen
Mads Melbye
Olof Nyrén
Henrik Hjalgrim
Gustaf Edgren
Source
Circulation. 2016 Apr 12;133(15):1449-57; discussion 1457
Date
Apr-12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - analysis - genetics
Adult
Arterial Occlusive Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Blood Donors - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - epidemiology - genetics
Pulmonary Embolism - epidemiology - genetics
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Thromboembolism - epidemiology - genetics
Thrombophilia - genetics
Venous Thrombosis - epidemiology - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
ABO blood groups have been shown to be associated with increased risks of venous thromboembolic and arterial disease. However, the reported magnitude of this association is inconsistent and is based on evidence from small-scale studies.
We used the SCANDAT2 (Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions) database of blood donors linked with other nationwide health data registers to investigate the association between ABO blood groups and the incidence of first and recurrent venous thromboembolic and arterial events. Blood donors in Denmark and Sweden between 1987 and 2012 were followed up for diagnosis of thromboembolism and arterial events. Poisson regression models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios as measures of relative risk. A total of 9170 venous and 24 653 arterial events occurred in 1 112 072 individuals during 13.6 million person-years of follow-up. Compared with blood group O, non-O blood groups were associated with higher incidence of both venous and arterial thromboembolic events. The highest rate ratios were observed for pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism (incidence rate ratio, 2.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.77-2.79), deep vein thrombosis (incidence rate ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.80-2.05), and pulmonary embolism (incidence rate ratio, 1.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.71-1.88).
In this healthy population of blood donors, non-O blood groups explain >30% of venous thromboembolic events. Although ABO blood groups may potentially be used with available prediction systems for identifying at-risk individuals, its clinical utility requires further comparison with other risk markers.
PubMed ID
26939588 View in PubMed
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[A retrospective examination of a hepatitis focus in plasma donors]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56842
Source
Gematol Transfuziol. 1993 Feb;38(2):42-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
T V Golosova
I V Osechinskii
A V Somova
I A Valeev
V P Gusarova
T V Shevchenko
Source
Gematol Transfuziol. 1993 Feb;38(2):42-4
Date
Feb-1993
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Donors - statistics & numerical data
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Disease Reservoirs - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Female
Hepatitis A - epidemiology - transmission
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - transmission
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - transmission
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Siberia - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Data are presented on the retrospective epidemiological serological investigation of episodes of hepatitis-like diseases among plasma donors in Krasnoyarsk. A mixed structure of the focus was established with prevalence of B- and non-A-, non-B hepatitides. Markers of recent infection with HB virus were recorded in 43.6% of sick donors, at the same time no donors had IgM antibodies to hepatitis A evidencing the acute stage or early convalescence. The use of the insufficiently sensitive passive hemagglutination test for HBsAg identification has resulted in incomplete detection of donors-carriers of HB virus.
PubMed ID
8020723 View in PubMed
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Association of Donor Age and Sex With Survival of Patients Receiving Transfusions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285053
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2017 Jun 01;177(6):854-860
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2017
Author
Gustaf Edgren
Henrik Ullum
Klaus Rostgaard
Christian Erikstrup
Ulrik Sartipy
Martin J Holzmann
Olof Nyrén
Henrik Hjalgrim
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2017 Jun 01;177(6):854-860
Date
Jun-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Donors - statistics & numerical data
Blood Transfusion - mortality
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Following animal model data indicating the possible rejuvenating effects of blood from young donors, there have been at least 2 observational studies conducted with humans that have investigated whether donor age affects patient outcomes. Results, however, have been conflicting.
To study the association of donor age and sex with survival of patients receiving transfusions.
A retrospective cohort study based on the Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions database, with nationwide data, was conducted for all patients from Sweden and Denmark who received at least 1 red blood cell transfusion of autologous blood or blood from unknown donors between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2012. Patients were followed up from the first transfusion until death, emigration, or end of follow-up. Data analysis was performed from September 15 to November 15, 2016.
The number of transfusions from blood donors of different age and sex. Exposure was treated time dependently throughout follow-up.
Hazard ratios (HRs) for death and adjusted cumulative mortality differences, both estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression.
Results of a crude analysis including 968?264 transfusion recipients (550?257 women and 418?007 men; median age at first transfusion, 73.0 years [interquartile range, 59.8-82.4 years]) showed a U-shaped association between age of the blood donor and recipient mortality, with a nadir in recipients for the most common donor age group (40-49 years) and significant and increasing HRs among recipients of blood from donors of successively more extreme age groups (
Notes
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PubMed ID
28437543 View in PubMed
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Blood donor survey in the Isle of Bute.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252086
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 1975 Jul;2(3):289-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1975
Author
M M Izatt
A C Swan
Author Affiliation
Glasgow and West of Scotland Blood Transfusion Service, Glasgow, Scotland.
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 1975 Jul;2(3):289-300
Date
Jul-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Blood Donors - statistics & numerical data
Employment
Geography
Health Surveys
Humans
Middle Aged
Motivation
Questionnaires
Scotland
Abstract
The ABO records of 392 blood donors in the Isle of Bute, Scotland, showed a significant excess of group A and decrease of group O compared with data from the adjacent mainland. A survey by questionnaire to explain these observations assessed the representative nature of the donor panel as a sample of the Bute population, with respect to sex, age, occupation and origin by birthplace and parental birthplace. The reported motivations first prompting the Bute panel to donate blood were analysed, especially those liable to introduce bias into the results. It was concluded that: the informative 318 donors were not an atypical sample; inclusion of Younger Kindred enhanced the group A frequency; inclusion of donors with knowledge of their blood groups before enrolment as donors introduced a counter-bias in favour of group O; the raised group A frequency of the Incomers to the island was probably attributable to admixture of an English population with a non-Bute Scottish population; the Brandanes could represent a small indigenous island population in which the incidence of group A has become high, but, as numbers were small, a chance observation could not be excluded.
PubMed ID
16431682 View in PubMed
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Complications related to blood donation: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160230
Source
Vox Sang. 2008 Feb;94(2):132-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
B S Sorensen
S P Johnsen
J. Jorgensen
Author Affiliation
Regional Blood Transfusion Centre and Department of Clinical Immunology, Aarhus University Hospital (Skejby), Aarhus, Denmark. betinasamuelsen@yahoo.dk
Source
Vox Sang. 2008 Feb;94(2):132-7
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Donors - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Denmark
Humans
Needlestick Injuries - epidemiology
Syncope, Vasovagal - epidemiology
Abstract
Population-based data on the rate and outcome of complications related to blood donation are sparse.
Data from a survey conducted in 2003 in Aarhus County, Denmark, were used to assess the overall rate of donor complications. Additional nationwide data on moderate and severe donor complications were obtained from the Danish Register of Complications Related to Blood Donation, with records of all moderate and severe donor complications in Denmark occurring during the period 1997-2003.
In the regional survey, we identified 340 complications of any type among 41 274 donations, corresponding to a rate of 824/100,000 donations [95% confidence interval (CI): 741-916]. All complications were either needle injuries or vasovagal reactions. In the nationwide register, a total of 752 moderate and severe complications were recorded among 2,575,264 donations, corresponding to a rate of 29/100,000 donations (95% CI: 27-31). The rates of complications leading to long-term morbidity or disablement (> 5% loss of working capacity) were 5/100,000 donations (95% CI: 4.2-5.9) and 2.3/100,000 donations (95% CI: 1.8-2.9), respectively.
The risk of complications related to blood donation is low. However, attention towards donor complications is warranted, given the non-negligible rate of complications resulting in long-term morbidity and disablement.
PubMed ID
18028259 View in PubMed
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Current incidence and residual risk of HIV, HBV and HCV at Canadian Blood Services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127487
Source
Vox Sang. 2012 Jul;103(1):83-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
S F O'Brien
Q-L Yi
W. Fan
V. Scalia
M A Fearon
J-P Allain
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology & Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. sheila.o’brien@blood.ca
Source
Vox Sang. 2012 Jul;103(1):83-6
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Donors - statistics & numerical data
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
HIV Infections - blood - epidemiology - transmission
HIV-1 - isolation & purification
HIV-2 - isolation & purification
Hepacivirus - isolation & purification
Hepatitis B - blood - epidemiology - transmission
Hepatitis B virus - isolation & purification
Hepatitis C - blood - epidemiology - transmission
Humans
Incidence
Risk factors
Abstract
Estimates of the viral residual risk should be updated to reflect current incidence of infection in blood donors. Incidence rates were estimated for allogeneic whole-blood donations made to Canadian Blood Services from 2006 to 2009 based on transmissible disease conversions of repeat donations within a 3-year period. Residual risk was estimated as the incidence multiplied by the window period. The residual risk of HIV was 1 per 8 million donations, HCV 1 per 6·7 million donations and HBV 1 per 1·7 million donations. The residual risk remains low and has decreased for HCV since our previous estimates due to reduced incidence.
PubMed ID
22289147 View in PubMed
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Declining hepatitis C rates in first-time blood donors: insight from surveillance and case-control risk factor studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159270
Source
Transfusion. 2008 May;48(5):902-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Sheila F O'Brien
Wenli Fan
Guoliang Xi
Qi-Long Yi
Mindy Goldman
Margaret A Fearon
Claire Infante-Rivard
Jo Anne Chiavetta
Bernard Willems
David Pi
Margaret Fast
Gilles Delage
Author Affiliation
National Epidemiology and Surveillance, Canadian Blood Services, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. sheila.o'brien@blood.ca
Source
Transfusion. 2008 May;48(5):902-9
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Blood Donors - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Health education
Hepatitis C - blood - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) rates have decreased steadily in first-time donors in Canada since testing was implemented but reasons are unclear. A description of factors that may have played a role in this decline is reported.
Descriptive analysis of first-time blood donors by HCV positivity status and year (1993--2006), sex, and age was carried out. HCV-positive first-time donors and matched controls participated in a confidential scripted telephone interview about risk factors in 1993 through 1994 and in 2005 through 2006, and risk factors independently predicting HCV positivity were determined with multiple logistic regression.
HCV-positive donations occurred most frequently in donors born between 1945 and 1964 and decreased in this birth cohort over time (p
PubMed ID
18208409 View in PubMed
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Diphtheria and tetanus immunity among blood donors in Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208929
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Apr 1;156(7):985-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1997
Author
L. Yuan
W. Lau
J. Thipphawong
M. Kasenda
F. Xie
J. Bevilacqua
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, University of Toronto.
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Apr 1;156(7):985-90
Date
Apr-1-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Donors - statistics & numerical data
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diphtheria - epidemiology - immunology
Diphtheria Antitoxin - blood
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Humans
Immunity
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Tetanus - epidemiology - immunology
Tetanus Antitoxin - blood
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To determine the diphtheria and tetanus antitoxin levels among blood donors in Toronto.
Cross-sectional seroprevalence study.
Two fixed-site blood-donation clinics in Toronto from September to November 1994.
Blood donors 20 years of age or older were eligible to participate; of the 781 eligible donors, 710 (90.9%) participated in the study.
Diphtheria and tetanus antitoxin levels and factors associated with disease susceptibility, such as vaccination history, country of birth, age and sex. A diphtheria antitoxin level lower than 0.01 lU/mL and a tetanus antitoxin level lower than 0.15 lU/mL were considered nonprotective.
Among the participants, 147 (20.7%) had a diphtheria antitoxin level in the nonprotective range, and 124 (17.5%) had a tetanus antitoxin level that was nonprotective. Increasing age and lack of written vaccination records were associated with susceptibility to the 2 diseases. Birth outside Canada was significantly related to tetanus susceptibility.
Adults over 50 years of age who did not know their vaccination history were the least likely to be protected against diphtheria and tetanus. The greatest benefit of any immunization strategy would be gained by targeting this group.
PubMed ID
9099166 View in PubMed
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Donation by donors with an atypical pulse rate does not increase the risk of cardiac ischaemic events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119141
Source
Vox Sang. 2013 May;104(4):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
M. Germain
G. Delage
Y. Grégoire
P. Robillard
Author Affiliation
Héma-Québec, Québec, QC, Canada. marc.germain@hema-quebec.qc.ca
Source
Vox Sang. 2013 May;104(4):309-16
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Donors - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Disease - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
In many jurisdictions, blood donors who have an atypical pulse rate are temporarily deferred. This practice is not supported by evidence. We evaluated whether accepting donors with an atypical pulse rate increases their risk of cardiac ischaemic events.
We measured the cumulative incidence of hospitalizations and deaths for coronary heart disease within 1 year of follow-up among donors who, between 2002 and 2006, were temporarily deferred because of an atypical pulse (100 beats/min, or irregular). We compared this incidence to that observed among donors who also had an atypical pulse but who were allowed to donate, following a change in our deferral policy in 2007. The occurrence of cardiac events was determined through hospital discharge and death registries.
Among 6076 donors who were temporarily deferred for an atypical pulse, the 1-year rate of hospitalization or death for cardiac ischaemic events was 3.5/1000, compared to 2.4 in donors who had an atypical pulse but who were allowed to donate (n =10,671), for an adjusted odds ratio of 1.7 (95% CI, 0.9-3.0, P=0.08).
Regardless of the clinical significance of an atypical pulse rate, our data show that accepting donors with this condition does not increase the occurrence of serious cardiac ischaemic events. We conclude that pulse rate measurement in prospective donors is not warranted.
PubMed ID
23134533 View in PubMed
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Donation frequency, iron loss, and risk of cancer among blood donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86808
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2008 Apr 16;100(8):572-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-16-2008
Author
Edgren Gustaf
Reilly Marie
Hjalgrim Henrik
Tran Trung Nam
Rostgaard Klaus
Adami Johanna
Titlestad Kjell
Shanwell Agneta
Melbye Mads
Nyrén Olof
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Box 281, SE-171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. gustaf.edgren@ki.se
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2008 Apr 16;100(8):572-9
Date
Apr-16-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Donors - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Iron - blood
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Odds Ratio
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Long-term deleterious effects of repeated blood donations may be masked by the donors' healthy lifestyle. To investigate possible effects of blood donation and iron loss through blood donation on cancer incidence while minimizing "healthy donor effects," we made dose-response comparisons within a cohort of Swedish and Danish blood donors. METHODS: We used a nested case-control study design, in which case patients were defined as all donors who were diagnosed with a malignancy between their first recorded blood donation and study termination (n = 10866). Control subjects (n = 107140) were individually matched on sex, age, and county of residence. Using conditional logistic regression, we estimated relative risks of cancer according to number of blood donations made or estimated iron loss 3-12 years before a case patient was diagnosed with cancer. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: No clear association was observed between number of donations and risk of cancer overall. However, between the lowest ( 90th percentile, > 2.7 g) categories of estimated iron loss, there was a trend (P(trend) 25 vs 0 donations, OR = 2.14, 95% CI = 1.22 to 3.74). CONCLUSIONS: Repeated blood donation was not associated with increased or decreased risk of cancer overall. The lack of consistency across latency periods casts doubt on an apparent association between reduced cancer risk and iron loss in men. The positive association between frequent plasma donation and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma deserves further exploration.
PubMed ID
18398098 View in PubMed
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58 records – page 1 of 6.