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98 records – page 1 of 10.

[4 years after Chernobyl: medical repercussions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25355
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
D. Hubert
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Date
1990
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Abortion, Habitual - epidemiology
Blood Cell Count
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Decontamination - methods
Diarrhea - etiology
English Abstract
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Psychophysiologic Disorders - etiology
Pulmonary Fibrosis - etiology
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Skin - radiation effects
Triage
Ukraine
Abstract
The nuclear accident at Chernobyl accounted for an acute radiation syndrome in 237 persons on the site. Triage was the initial problem and was carried out according to clinical and biological criteria; evaluating the doses received was based on these criteria. Thirty one persons died and only 1 survived a dose higher than 6 Gy. Skin radiation burns which were due to inadequate decontamination, greatly worsened prognosis. The results of 13 bone marrow transplantations were disappointing, with only 2 survivors. Some time after the accident, these severely irradiated patients are mainly suffering from psychosomatic disorders, in the USSR, some areas have been significantly contaminated and several measures were taken to mitigate the impact on population: evacuating 135,000 persons, distributing prophylactic iodine, establishing standards and controls on foodstuff. Radiation phobia syndrome which developed in many persons, is the only sanitary effect noticed up to now. Finally, in Europe, there was only an increase in induced abortions and this was totally unwarranted. If we consider the risk of radiation induced cancer, an effect might not be demonstrated.
PubMed ID
2205311 View in PubMed
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Additional value of biochemical tests in suspected acute appendicitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34215
Source
Eur J Surg. 1997 Jul;163(7):533-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
S. Hallan
A. Asberg
T H Edna
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Innherred Hospital, Levanger, Norway.
Source
Eur J Surg. 1997 Jul;163(7):533-8
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - etiology
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Appendicitis - diagnosis
Blood Cell Count
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Hematologic Tests
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
ROC Curve
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of biochemical tests in diagnosing acute appendicitis. DESIGN: Open prospective study. SETTING: District hospital, Norway. SUBJECTS: 257 patients with suspected acute appendicitis. INTERVENTIONS: Initial diagnostic accuracy of a logistic regression model using available clinical data was compared with results of corresponding models that included an increasing number of inflammatory parameters. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The estimated probabilities of appendicitis in different testing groups were analysed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. RESULTS: A model including only clinical variables had a mean area under the ROC curve of 0.854. When the total white blood cell count, C-reactive protein concentration, and neutrophil count were added, the model improved significantly to 0.920. CONCLUSION: Biochemical tests are of additional value in a computer model, and the tests should, if used rationally, also provide physicians with important information in the investigation of acute appendicitis.
PubMed ID
9248988 View in PubMed
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Alpha thalassemia: five cases of hemoglobin H disease in three Oriental-Canadian families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110576
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1968 Jul 13;99(2):49-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-13-1968
Author
R Y Ing
J H Crookston
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1968 Jul 13;99(2):49-56
Date
Jul-13-1968
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Blood Cell Count
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrophoresis
Erythrocytes, Abnormal - metabolism
Female
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Hemoglobins, Abnormal - analysis - biosynthesis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pedigree
Peptide Biosynthesis
Phenotype
Thalassemia - blood - etiology - genetics
Notes
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PubMed ID
5664181 View in PubMed
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Automated malaria detection by depolarization of laser light.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202823
Source
Br J Haematol. 1999 Mar;104(3):499-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
B V Mendelow
C. Lyons
P. Nhlangothi
M. Tana
M. Munster
E. Wypkema
L. Liebowitz
L. Marshall
S. Scott
T L Coetzer
Author Affiliation
Department of Haematology, University of the Witwatersrand and the South African Institute for Medical Research, Johannesburg.
Source
Br J Haematol. 1999 Mar;104(3):499-503
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Cell Count - methods
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Humans
Lasers - diagnostic use
Malaria, Falciparum - blood - diagnosis
Parasitemia - blood - diagnosis
Parasitology - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Anecdotal experience with full blood count (FBC) technology incorporating analysis of depolarized laser light (DLL) for the enumeration of eosinophils showed that malaria infection generated unusual distributions in the white cell channels. The objective of this study was to identify and define criteria for a diagnosis of malaria using this technology. To determine sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values, 224 directed samples referred specifically for malaria were used; true positives were defined as those in which malaria was identified by microscopic and/or immunological methods. For the DLL method, positive was defined as one or more large mononuclear cell(s) for which the 90 degrees depolarized signal exceeded the 90 degrees polarized signal. To determine possible utility in a routine haematology laboratory setting, 220 random undirected FBC samples were evaluated for possible malaria infection by the DLL method. Of the 224 directed samples, 95 were malaria positive as determined by microscopic and/or immunological methods, and 129 were negative. For the DLL method, overall sensitivity was 72% (90% in the case of Black Africans), and specificity 96%. Positive and negative predictive values overall were 93% and 82% respectively. In the utility study a single positive result was identified among the 220 samples studied. This was found to be from a patient with malaria. The detection of unexpected malaria by automated screening FBC analysis could substantially lower the mortality and morbidity from unascertained infection, especially in indigenous African peoples.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Haematol. 1999 Jul;106(1):257-810444201
PubMed ID
10086786 View in PubMed
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[Blood morphology in inhabitants of Amur Province].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253196
Source
Probl Gematol Pereliv Krovi. 1974 Sep;19(9):52-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1974

Blood product ratio in acute traumatic coagulopathy--effect on mortality in a Scandinavian level 1 trauma centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138772
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2010;18:65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Jesper Dirks
Henrik Jørgensen
Carsten H Jensen
Sisse R Ostrowski
Pär I Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia, Centre of Head and Orthopedics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. Dirks@dadlnet.dk
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2010;18:65
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Cell Count
Blood Coagulation Disorders - blood - etiology - therapy
Blood Component Transfusion - methods
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Trauma Centers
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - blood - therapy
Abstract
Trauma is the leading cause of loss of life expectancy worldwide. In the most seriously injured patients, coagulopathy is often present on admission. Therefore, transfusion strategies to increase the ratio of plasma (FFP) and platelets (PLT) to red blood cells (RBC), simulating whole blood, have been introduced. Several studies report that higher ratios improve survival in massively bleeding patients. Here, the aim was to investigate the potential effect of increased FFP and PLT to RBC on mortality in trauma patients.
In a retrospective before and after study, all trauma patients primarily admitted to a level-one Trauma Centre, receiving blood transfusion, in 2001-3 (n = 97) and 2005-7 (n = 156), were included. In 2001-3, FFP and PLT were administered in accordance with the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) guidelines whereas in 2005-7, Hemostatic Control Resuscitation (HCR) entailing pre-emptive use of FFP and PLT in transfusion packages during uncontrolled haemorrhage and thereafter guided by thrombelastograph (TEG) analysis was employed. The effect of transfusion therapy and coagulopathy on mortality was investigated.
Patients included in the early and late period had comparable demography, injury severity score (ISS), admission hematology and coagulopathy (27% vs. 34% had APTT above normal). There was a significant change in blood transfusion practice with shorter time interval from admission to first transfusion (median time 3 min vs.28 min in massive bleeders, p
Notes
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2006 Jan;34(1):15-2116374151
Cites: Transfusion. 2006 May;46(5):685-616686833
Cites: Transfusion. 2007 Apr;47(4):593-817381616
Cites: Curr Opin Crit Care. 2007 Dec;13(6):680-517975390
Cites: J Trauma. 2007 Oct;63(4):805-1318090009
Cites: Transfus Apher Sci. 2008 Aug;39(1):3-818583193
Cites: Vox Sang. 2008 Aug;95(2):112-918557827
Cites: Ann Surg. 2008 Sep;248(3):447-5818791365
Cites: Ann Surg. 2008 Oct;248(4):578-8418936570
Cites: J Trauma. 2009 Jan;66(1):41-8; discussion 48-919131804
Cites: Vox Sang. 2009 Feb;96(2):111-819152603
Cites: Injury. 2009 Jan;40(1):11-2019135193
Cites: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2009 Apr;53(4):515-2119317866
Cites: J Am Coll Surg. 2009 Aug;209(2):198-20519632596
Cites: J Trauma. 2009 Nov;67(5):1004-1219901661
Cites: Biologicals. 2010 Jan;38(1):72-720074980
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2010 Apr;65(4):429-3320018825
Cites: J Am Coll Surg. 2010 May;210(5):788-94, 794-620421051
Cites: Blood. 2010 Jun 10;115(23):4886-9320348393
Cites: Transfusion. 2010 Mar;50(3):701-1019929864
Cites: J Trauma. 2010 Sep;69(3):645-5220526211
Cites: J Trauma. 2003 Jul;55(1):39-4412855879
Cites: J Trauma. 2003 Jun;54(6):1127-3012813333
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Cites: Vox Sang. 2005 Aug;89(2):92-616101690
Cites: Vox Sang. 2005 Oct;89(3):123-716146503
PubMed ID
21138569 View in PubMed
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Bone and vitamin D status in patients with anorexia nervosa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264626
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Nov;61(11):A4940
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Stine Aistrup Eriksen
Hanne Prietzel
Jenna Rosenqvist Ibsen
Marlene Briciet Lauritsen
Peter Vestergaard
Gry Kjaersdam Telléus
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Nov;61(11):A4940
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adolescent
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - blood - physiopathology
Blood Cell Count
Bone Density - physiology
Calcium - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Hip - radiography
Humans
Lumbar vertebrae - radiography
Male
Malnutrition - physiopathology
Osteogenesis - physiology
Time Factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate bone status and biological mechanisms involved in the negative impact of anorexia nervosa (AN) on osteogenesis.
A total of 30 AN patients from Aalborg University Hospital who underwent bone scans were included in a cross-sectional study. Biochemical data, bone scans (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)) as well as general health and medical information had been collected during the 2009-2011 period and stored via local and national clinical databases in Denmark, and from these databases we identified all patients with an AN diagnosis who underwent bone scans.
AN patients had a mean Z-score of -1.5 to -1.6 in lumbar spine and total hip, respectively. The hip Z-score decreased with duration of disease, and a positive correlation was seen between serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D level and spine Z-score but not hip Z-score. Bone mineral density did not seem to change with time since diagnosis. Additionally, a negative correlation between serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels and serum total alkaline phosphatase levels was found. A serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D level below 50 nmol/l was associated with increased alkaline phosphatase levels.
Rather than clinical measures including BMI and biochemical measures disease duration was the main predictor of bone status. This implies that long-term disease should be a main factor in selecting patients for referral to DXA. Moreover, results from this study indicate normal osteoblastic response to malnutrition.
not relevant.
The present study was not registered due to its register-based design. However, the study was approved by the Danish Data Protection Agency.
PubMed ID
25370958 View in PubMed
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98 records – page 1 of 10.