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60 records – page 1 of 6.

Abundance and diversity of human-biting flies (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae, Culicidae, Tabanidae, Simuliidae) around a nickel-copper smelter at Monchegorsk, northwestern Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169895
Source
J Vector Ecol. 2005 Dec;30(2):263-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
M V Kozlov
N K Brodskaya
A. Haarto
K. Kuusela
M. Schäfer
V. Zverev
Author Affiliation
Section ofEcology, Department ofBiology, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku, Finland.
Source
J Vector Ecol. 2005 Dec;30(2):263-71
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bites and Stings - epidemiology
Ceratopogonidae - growth & development
Copper - toxicity
Culicidae - growth & development
Diptera - growth & development
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Humans
Nickel - toxicity
Population Density
Population Dynamics
Russia
Seasons
Simuliidae - growth & development
Species Specificity
Abstract
In the summers of 2001 and 2002, we quantitatively sampled human-biting flies in twelve sites located 1.6 to 63 km from a large copper-nickel smelter at Monchegorsk on the Kola Peninsula, Russia. We collected 429 specimens of three species of Ceratopogonidae, 92 specimens of seven species of Culicidae, 76 specimens of seven species of Tabanidae, and 4,788 specimens of 19 species of Simuliidae. Culicoides chiropterus was for the first time reported from the Kola Peninsula. Catches of Culicidae and Simuliidae decreased near the smelter, presumably due to the combined action of toxicity of pollutants, pollution-induced forest damage, and decline in vertebrate density. An abundance of Ceratopogonidae and Tabanidae, the size of the most common black fly species, Simulium pusillum, and the diversity of all families did not change along the pollution gradient.
PubMed ID
16599161 View in PubMed
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An epidemiologic study of Lyme disease in southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14321
Source
N Engl J Med. 1995 Nov 16;333(20):1319-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-16-1995
Author
J. Berglund
R. Eitrem
K. Ornstein
A. Lindberg
A. Ringér
H. Elmrud
M. Carlsson
A. Runehagen
C. Svanborg
R. Norrby
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Lund, Sweden.
Source
N Engl J Med. 1995 Nov 16;333(20):1319-27
Date
Nov-16-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Insect Bites and Stings - epidemiology
Ixodes
Lyme Disease - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nervous System Diseases - etiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND. Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne infection in some temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. However, for most areas of endemic disease reliable epidemiologic data are sparse. METHODS. Over a one-year period, we conducted a prospective, population-based survey of cases of Lyme disease in southern Sweden. The diagnosis was made on the basis of the presence of erythema migrans at least 5 cm in diameter or characteristic clinical manifestations such as arthritis, neuroborreliosis, and carditis. RESULTS. We identified 1471 patients with Lyme disease, for an overall annual incidence of 69 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. The incidence varied markedly according to geographic region, and there were several areas where disease was widely prevalent. The incidence varied according to age, with the highest rates among people 5 to 9 and 60 to 74 years of age, but not according to sex. The most frequent clinical manifestation was erythema migrans (seen in 77 percent of all cases), followed by neuroborreliosis (16 percent) and arthritis (7 percent). Carditis was rare. A preceding tick bite was reported by 79 percent of the patients. Bites in the head and neck region were more common among children than among adults and were associated with an increased risk of neuroborreliosis. CONCLUSIONS. Lyme disease is very common in southern Sweden, with a relatively high frequency of neurologic complications and arthritis. With the exception of the low incidence of carditis, the pattern of disease we found in Sweden was similar to that reported in the United States.
Notes
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 1996 Mar 21;334(12):8038592568
PubMed ID
7566023 View in PubMed
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[Animal bites. Epidemiology and possibilities of intervention]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38921
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Mar 16;149(12):809-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-16-1987

Animal control measures and their relationship to the reported incidence of dog bites in urban Canadian municipalities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108326
Source
Can Vet J. 2013 Feb;54(2):145-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Nancy M Clarke
David Fraser
Author Affiliation
Animal Welfare Program, University of British Columbia, 2357 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada. nancy.clarke@ubc.ca
Source
Can Vet J. 2013 Feb;54(2):145-9
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Identification Systems
Animals
Bites and Stings - epidemiology - prevention & control
Canada
Cities - legislation & jurisprudence
Dogs
Humans
Incidence
Abstract
Various measures, including ticketing, licensing, and breed-specific legislation, are used by municipalities to control dog bites, but their effectiveness is largely unknown. Thirty-six urban Canadian municipalities provided information about their animal control practices, resourcing, and (for 22 municipalities) rate of reported dog bites. Municipalities differed widely in rates of licensing (4% to 75%) and ticketing (0.1 to 83 per 10,000 people), even where staffing and budgets were similar. Reported frequency of dog bites ranged from 0 to 9.0 (median 1.9) per 10,000 people. Rates were generally higher in municipalities with higher ticketing, licensing, staffing, and budget levels. However, in municipalities with very active ticketing the reported bite rate was much lower than predicted by a linear regression on ticketing rate (quadratic regression, R(2) = 0.52), likely reflecting a reduction in actual bites with very active enforcement. Municipalities with and without breed-specific legislation did not differ in reported bite rate. Ticketing appeared most effective in reducing dog bites, although it may also lead to increased reporting.
Notes
Cites: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2001 Jun 1;218(11):1732-4911394820
Cites: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2001 Jun 15;218(12):1923-3411417736
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1985 May-Jun;100(3):315-213923540
Cites: Injury. 1996 Mar;27(2):89-918730379
Cites: Inj Prev. 1996 Mar;2(1):52-49346056
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1997 Oct;87(10):1703-59357359
Cites: Can Vet J. 2005 Aug;46(8):735-4316187720
Cites: Vet J. 2006 Nov;172(3):482-715996492
Cites: Can Vet J. 2008 Jun;49(6):577-8118624067
Cites: Inj Prev. 2008 Oct;14(5):296-30118836045
PubMed ID
23904637 View in PubMed
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[Antibacterial therapy as a means of preventing ixodid tick-borne borreliosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212198
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1996 Apr-Jun;(2):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
E I Korenberg
N N Vorob'eva
G G Moskvitina
L Ia Gorban'
Iu V Kovalevskii
A G Gusmanova
G M Volegova
V G Korovka
V I Frizen
L G Vnukova
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1996 Apr-Jun;(2):3-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Arachnid Vectors
Bites and Stings - epidemiology - prevention & control
Borrelia Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Doxycycline - administration & dosage
Drug Evaluation
Humans
Ixodes
Russia - epidemiology
Seasons
Time Factors
Abstract
A special epidemiological experiment to prevent borreliosis in persons bitten by infected ticks was performed in 1992-1994 in the Russia's Perm region where Borrelia garinii and B.afzelii circulate, and Ixodes persulcatus tick is the sole vector transmitting these pathogens to human beings. Adult ticks were removed from the bodies of persons who had referred to health facilities for first aid. Vital preparations were made from the material obtained from the gut of each tick and examined microscopically (up to 250 microscopic fields per preparation). The patients bitten by infected ticks were divided into experimental and control groups and kept under special medical and serological control for 4-5 months. The patients of the experimental group received doxycycline (100 mg twice daily) for 3-5 days after ticks had bitten. Borreliosis was diagnosed by a combination of clinical and serological data. The control group consisted of 97 patients who took no antibiotics after ticks biting and 12 of them contracted borreliosis. In 823 cases Borrelia were not revealed while microscopically analyzing the ticks removed from the patients' bodies; in this group six patients contracted borreliosis. The morbidity rate (per 100 patients) in the experimental group was 1.1, i.e. 11 times lower than that in control group. Among the patients bitten by infected ticks and untreated with antibiotics, this index was 17.6 times higher than in the group bitten by ticks in which Borrelia were not found. There is no absolute probability of detecting the pathogen during a direct microscopic analysis of the preparation made from the tick removed from the body of a bitten patient. However, this rapid identification of Borrelia, followed by short-term antibiotic treatment for microbiological evidence is an effective tool for preventing patients from contracting borrelioses.
PubMed ID
8926931 View in PubMed
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[Attacks of black flies (Diptera, Simuliidae) on man in the Udmurt ASSR].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238902
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1985 May-Jun;(3):87-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
S M Mukanov
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1985 May-Jun;(3):87-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Humans
Insect Bites and Stings - epidemiology
Population Density
Russia
Seasons
Simuliidae
PubMed ID
3162090 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Attempt to determine the threshold densities of biting mosquitoes that disturb human beings].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248662
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1978 May-Jun;47(3):110-1
Publication Type
Article
Source
Alaska Med. 1982 May-Jun;24(3):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
S C Rose
Source
Alaska Med. 1982 May-Jun;24(3):29-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Animals
Bites and Stings - epidemiology
Carnivora
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ursidae
PubMed ID
7125149 View in PubMed
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Bee and wasp sting reactions in current beekeepers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210736
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 1996 Nov;77(5):423-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
I T Annila
E S Karjalainen
P A Annila
P A Kuusisto
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 1996 Nov;77(5):423-7
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Bee Venoms - adverse effects
Bees
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Insect Bites and Stings - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Wasp Venoms - adverse effects
Wasps
Abstract
A majority of subjects allergic to bee venom are beekeepers, their relatives, or neighbors. Predetermining systemic reactivity to honeybee stings and risk assessment through laboratory tests have been unsatisfactory.
To estimate the prevalence and type of sting reactions, and especially to evaluate potential risk factors of systemic reactions in beekeepers.
A questionnaire concerning sting reactions and potential risk factors was mailed to all members of the regional beekeepers' association; 191 beekeepers were included in the study.
Systemic bee sting reactions were present in 50 (26%) and large local reactions in 73 (38%) of the beekeepers. Similar reactions following wasp stings were present in 2% and 13%, respectively. Twenty-four (48%) of the systemic reactors and 39 (28%) of the remaining subjects had a history of atopic symptoms (allergic rhinitis, allergic bronchial asthma, or atopic dermatitis). While working at hives, nasal and eye symptoms were present in 54% of the systemic reactors and in 23% of the remaining subjects. Systemic reactors were younger and had been beekeepers for a shorter period than nonreactive subjects. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of systemic sting reaction increased fourfold when nasal or eye symptoms were present while working at hives and twofold when the years in beekeeping were less than 15.
The occurrence of systemic and large local reactions after bee stings is high among beekeepers. A history of atopy is associated with systemic reactions. Both the presence of nasal or eye symptoms while working at hives and a history of beekeeping less than 15 years significantly increase the risk of systemic reactions.
PubMed ID
8933782 View in PubMed
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[Bite wounds of maxillofacial area: situation analysis for the Tver region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146476
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 2009;88(5):34-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
V V Bogatov
S N Lebedev
D V Ziabkin
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 2009;88(5):34-6
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Animals
Bites and Stings - epidemiology - surgery
Cats
Child
Dogs
Esthetics
Facial Injuries - epidemiology - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Rats
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
489 cases of references concerning the bitten wounds of maxillofacial area for the period of 1998-2008 were analysed. The analysis has shown that 77 (15,7%) cases with localization of the bitten wounds on fase had long, serious functional - aesthetic infringements, and the majority of cultural and life conditions questions, analyzed behavioural aspects of the population of the Tver region, remained unresolved actual problem.
PubMed ID
20037536 View in PubMed
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60 records – page 1 of 6.