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Accounts of HIV seroconversion among substance-using gay and bisexual men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148150
Source
Qual Health Res. 2009 Oct;19(10):1395-406
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Jeffrey P Aguinaldo
Ted Myers
Karen Ryder
Dennis J Haubrich
Liviana Calzavara
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. jaguinaldo@wlu.ca
Source
Qual Health Res. 2009 Oct;19(10):1395-406
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bisexuality
Case-Control Studies
HIV Seropositivity - psychology - transmission
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Ontario
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Abstract
Statistical associations between substance use and seroconversion among gay and bisexual men abound. However, these associations often ignore men's own interpretations of their seroconversion. Using in-depth interviews with gay and bisexual men who reported using drugs or alcohol at the time of their seroconversion, we identify how these men explain the events that led to HIV transmission. Whereas a small minority of respondents reported substance use to explain their seroconversion, the majority reported three competing explanations. These participants claimed that they lacked sufficient knowledge about the behavioral risks that led to their seroconversion; that their decision to engage in unsafe sex was because of negative personal affect; and that they "trusted the wrong person." We link these findings to prevention and suggest that gay and bisexual men who use substances for recreational purposes will benefit from prevention efforts designed to address issues of gay and bisexual men rather than substance-using men.
PubMed ID
19805802 View in PubMed
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Addressing the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, queer, and questioning clients within university psychiatric services: reflections and recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174981
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2003;22(2):59-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Jude Tate
Lori E Ross
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2003;22(2):59-68
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bisexuality - psychology
Female
Health services needs and demand
Homosexuality - psychology
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Ontario
Program Development
Student Health Services - organization & administration
Transsexualism - psychology
Abstract
Concerns still exist among lesbian-, gay-, bisexual-, transgendered-, and queer-identified individuals (LGBTQ individuals) about their reception and treatment by psychiatric service providers. The Psychiatric Service at the University of Toronto and the Office of LGBTQ Resources and Programs convened a committee to address expanding the capacities of the Service related to the needs of LGBTQ and questioning students. In this paper, we describe the committee's role, initiatives, and successes and discuss challenges encountered in the process. The model of community development drawn from in this work can be adapted for use in other community health settings.
PubMed ID
15868838 View in PubMed
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Adjustment among mothers reporting same-gender sexual partners: a study of a representative population sample from Quebec Province (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162178
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2008 Dec;37(6):864-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Danielle Julien
Emilie Jouvin
Emilie Jodoin
Alexandre L'archevêque
Elise Chartrand
Author Affiliation
Département de psychologie, University of Quebec at Montréal, C. P. 8888, Succ. Centreville, Montreal, QC, Canada. julien.danielle@uqam.ca
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2008 Dec;37(6):864-76
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bisexuality - statistics & numerical data
Child
Female
Heterosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Homosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parenting - psychology
Quebec - epidemiology
Sexual Partners - psychology
Sexuality - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Socialization
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We examined the well-being of mothers and non-mothers reporting exclusive opposite-gender sexual partners (OG), same-gender sexual partners (SG), or both (BI) in a representative sample of 20,773 participants (11,034 women) 15-years-old or older from the population of Quebec province in Canada. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire and SG and BI women (n = 179) were matched to a sample of OG women (n = 179) based on age, income, geographical area, and children (having at least one 18-year-old or younger biological or adopted child at home). We assessed social milieu variables, risk factors for health disorders, mental health, and quality of mothers' relationship with children. The findings indicated a sexual orientation main effect: Mothers and non-mothers in the SG and BI group, as compared to their OG controls, were significantly less likely to live in a couple relationship, had significantly lower levels of social support, higher prevalence of early negative life events, substance abuse, suicide ideation, and higher levels of psychological distress. There were no Sexual Orientation X Parenthood status effects. The results further indicated that sexual orientation did not account for unique variance in women's psychological distress beyond that afforded by their social milieu, health risk factors, and parenthood status. No significant differences were found for the quality of mothers' relationship with children. SG-BI and OG mothers with low levels of social integration were significantly more likely to report problems with children than parents with high levels of social integration. We need to understand how marginal sexualities and their associated social stigma, as risk indicators for mothers, interact with other factors to impact family life, parenting skills, and children's adjustment.
PubMed ID
17665300 View in PubMed
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[AIDS: Local activism is public health. Principles and strategies for providing information on AIDS to gays and bisexual men in Denmark 1981-1989]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8460
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Oct 2;151(40):2613-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2-1989

AIDS optimism, condom fatigue, or self-esteem? Explaining unsafe sex among gay and bisexual men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173573
Source
J Sex Res. 2005 Aug;42(3):238-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Barry D Adam
Winston Husbands
James Murray
John Maxwell
Author Affiliation
University of Windsor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. adam@uwindsor.ca
Source
J Sex Res. 2005 Aug;42(3):238-48
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control - psychology - transmission
Adult
Bisexuality - psychology
Condoms - utilization
Depression - psychology
Erectile Dysfunction - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Homosexuality, Male - psychology
Humans
Internal-External Control
Interview, Psychological
Intuition
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Self Concept
Sexual Partners - psychology
Truth Disclosure
Unsafe Sex - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examines leading explanations for unsafe sex in light of in-depth interviews with 102 high-risk gay and bisexual men in Toronto to see how well they engage with the social circumstances and reasoning processes of men in their sexual relationships. We argue that there is an inadequate fit between some of the leading explanations and the discursive accounts provided by high risk men themselves. Their accounts focus on unsafe sex occurring as a resolution to condom and erectile difficulties, through momentary lapses and trade offs, out of personal turmoil and depression, and as a byproduct of strategies of disclosure and intuiting safety. This study examines, in particular the circumstances and rationales associated with men who identify their practices as "barebacking." We conclude with recommendations for communicating prevention messages to those most at risk based on the self-understandings of gay and bisexual men who most frequently practice unprotected sex.
PubMed ID
19817037 View in PubMed
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Alcohol misuse and associations with childhood maltreatment and out-of-home placement among urban two-spirit American Indian and Alaska Native people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264468
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014;11(10):10461-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Nicole P Yuan
Bonnie M Duran
Karina L Walters
Cynthia R Pearson
Tessa A Evans-Campbell
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014;11(10):10461-79
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adoption - ethnology - psychology
Adult
Alaska - ethnology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - ethnology
Bisexuality - psychology
Child
Child Abuse - ethnology
Female
Foster Home Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Homosexuality, Female - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Male
United States - ethnology
Abstract
This study examined associations between alcohol misuse and childhood maltreatment and out-of-home placement among urban lesbian, gay, and bisexual (referred to as two-spirit) American Indian and Alaska Native adults. In a multi-site study, data were obtained from 294 individuals who consumed alcohol during the past year. The results indicated that 72.3% of men and 62.4% of women engaged in hazardous and harmful alcohol use and 50.8% of men and 48.7% of women met criteria for past-year alcohol dependence. The most common types of childhood maltreatment were physical abuse among male drinkers (62.7%) and emotional abuse (71.8%) among female drinkers. Men and women reported high percentages of out-of-home placement (39% and 47%, respectively). Logistic multiple regressions found that for male drinkers boarding school attendance and foster care placement were significant predictors of past-year alcohol dependence. For female drinkers, being adopted was significantly associated with a decreased risk of past-year drinking binge or spree. Dose-response relationships, using number of childhood exposures as a predictor, were not significant. The results highlight the need for alcohol and violence prevention and intervention strategies among urban two-spirit individuals.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25317980 View in PubMed
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American Indian gay, bisexual and two-spirit men: a rapid assessment of HIV/AIDS risk factors, barriers to prevention and culturally-sensitive intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139559
Source
Cult Health Sex. 2011 Mar;13(3):283-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Derek J Burks
Rockey Robbins
Jayson P Durtschi
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterans Affairs, Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Centre, Portland, USA. derek.burks@va.gov
Source
Cult Health Sex. 2011 Mar;13(3):283-98
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bisexuality
Cultural Competency
Data Collection
Focus Groups
HIV Infections - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Health Services Accessibility
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Indians, North American
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Oklahoma - epidemiology
Primary Prevention
Risk factors
Abstract
Epidemiological data indicate that HIV and AIDS are disproportionately affecting American Indians. Specific to American Indian men identifying as gay, bisexual, two-spirit or who have same-sex experiences, this study assessed HIV-risk behaviours and barriers to testing, prevention and treatment efforts. A rapid assessment model was utilised as an indigenous-supporting research design. Rigour and thoroughness were achieved via multiple validation procedures. Central themes surrounding barriers to HIV prevention included social discrimination, low self-esteem and substance use. Findings suggest the underutilisation of condoms due to ineffective placement and limited availability in popular locations among gay, bisexual and two-spirit individuals. Participants indicated that HIV testing is occurring less frequently and that testing was not available after hours or weekends. Barriers to treatment included a mistrust of the current healthcare system, a perceived lack of support from the Indian Health Service for AIDS care and a lack of transportation to healthcare appointments. Lastly, participants discussed and supported culturally-sensitive treatment services. This study calls attention to the value of an American Indian-specific HIV/AIDS service organisation, the presence of indigenous service providers in the community and culturally-sensitive healthcare providers.
PubMed ID
21049311 View in PubMed
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[An anonymous survey of the population for antibodies to the virus causing AIDS].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231146
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1989 Mar;(3):53-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1989
Author
V V Pokrovskii
A I Mazus
A I Akimov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1989 Mar;(3):53-7
Date
Mar-1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - transmission
Adolescent
Adult
Bisexuality
Female
HIV Antibodies - analysis
Homosexuality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
The anonymous survey of the population for the presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) carried out in Moscow in 1987 revealed 4 seropositive persons among 10, 117 persons subjected to examination. These 4 persons belonged to typical risk groups with respect to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The questioning of the persons coming for examination made it possible to find out that a large percentage of them really had a risk of contacting HIV infection; besides, a considerable proportion of the visitors proved to have signs of AIDS phobia.
PubMed ID
2741605 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An epidemic of syphilis among homosexual and bisexual men. Results of tracing the sources of infection].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233596
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Jan 18;150(3):141-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-18-1988

Anxiety and Depression Among Sexual Minority Women and Men in Sweden: Is the Risk Equally Spread Within the Sexual Minority Population?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282422
Source
J Sex Med. 2017 Mar;14(3):396-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Charlotte Björkenstam
Emma Björkenstam
Gunnar Andersson
Susan Cochran
Kyriaki Kosidou
Source
J Sex Med. 2017 Mar;14(3):396-403
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Bisexuality - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Homosexuality, Female - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Minorities - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Sexual minority individuals have a higher risk of anxiety and depression compared with heterosexuals. However, whether the higher risk is spread equally across the sexual minority population is not clear.
To investigate the association between sexual orientation and self-reported current anxiety and a history of diagnosis of depression, paying particular attention to possible subgroup differences in risks within the sexual minority population, stratified by sex and to examine participants' history of medical care for anxiety disorders and depression.
We conducted a population-based study of 874 lesbians and gays, 841 bisexuals, and 67,980 heterosexuals recruited in 2010 in Stockholm County. Data were obtained from self-administered surveys that were linked to nationwide registers.
By using logistic regression, we compared risks of current anxiety, histories of diagnosed depression, and register-based medical care for anxiety and/or depression in lesbian and gay, bisexual, and heterosexual individuals.
Bisexual women and gay men were more likely to report anxiety compared with their heterosexual peers. Bisexual individuals and gay men also were more likely to report a past diagnosis of depression. All sexual minority groups had an increased risk of having used medical care for anxiety and depression compared with heterosexuals, with bisexual women having the highest risk.
Bisexual women appear to be a particularly vulnerable sexual minority group. Advocating for non-discrimination and protections for lesbian, gay, and bisexual people is a logical extension of the effort to lower the prevalence of mental illness. Björkenstam C, Björkenstam E, Andersson G, et al. Anxiety and Depression Among Sexual Minority Women and Men in Sweden: Is the Risk Equally Spread Within the Sexual Minority Population? J Sex Med 2017;14:396-403.
PubMed ID
28202321 View in PubMed
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142 records – page 1 of 15.