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317 records – page 1 of 32.

Addison's disease in women is a risk factor for an adverse pregnancy outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140577
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Dec;95(12):5249-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Sigridur Björnsdottir
Sven Cnattingius
Lena Brandt
Anna Nordenström
Anders Ekbom
Olle Kämpe
Sophie Bensing
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. Sigridur.Bjornsdottir@karolinska.se
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Dec;95(12):5249-57
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Addison Disease - complications - epidemiology - immunology - mortality
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Diseases - complications
Adult
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy outcome
Registries
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) tends to affect young and middle-aged women. It is not known whether the existence of undiagnosed or diagnosed AAD influences the outcome of pregnancy.
The aim of the study was to compare the number of children and pregnancy outcomes in individuals with AAD and controls.
We conducted a population-based historical cohort study in Sweden.
Through the Swedish National Patient Register and the Total Population Register, we identified 1,188 women with AAD and 11,879 age-matched controls who delivered infants between 1973 and 2006.
We measured parity and pregnancy outcome.
Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for infants born to mothers with deliveries 3 yr or less before the diagnosis of AAD were 2.40 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.27-4.53] for preterm birth (=37 wk), 3.50 (95% CI, 1.83-6.67) for low birth weight (
PubMed ID
20861125 View in PubMed
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The adequacy of prenatal care and incidence of low birthweight among the poor in Washington State and British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218009
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Jun;84(6):986-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
S J Katz
R W Armstrong
J P LoGerfo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Jun;84(6):986-91
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Medicaid
National Health Programs
Odds Ratio
Parity
Poverty
Prenatal Care
Quality of Health Care
Risk factors
United States
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine differences in adequacy of prenatal care and incidence of low birthweight between low-income women with Medicaid in Washington State and low-income women with Canadian provincial health insurance in British Columbia.
A population-based cross-sectional study was done by using linked birth certificates and claims data.
Overall, the adjusted odds ratio for inadequate prenatal care in Washington (comparing women with Medicaid with those with private insurance) was 3.2. However, the risk varied by time of Medicaid enrollment relative to pregnancy (2.0, 1.0, 2.7, 6.3; for women who enrolled prior to pregnancy, during the first trimester, during the second trimester, or during the third trimester, respectively). In British Columbia, the adjusted odds ratio for inadequate care (comparing women receiving a health premium subsidy with those receiving no subsidy) was 1.5 for women receiving a 100% subsidy and 1.2 for women receiving a 95% subsidy. The risk for low birthweight followed a similar trend in both regions, but there was no association with enrollment period in Washington.
Overall, the risk for inadequate prenatal care among poor women was much greater in Washington than in British Columbia. Most of the difference was due to Washington women's delayed enrollment in Medicaid. In both regions, the poor were at similar risk for low birthweight relative to their more affluent counterparts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8203697 View in PubMed
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Advanced maternal age increases the risk of very preterm birth, irrespective of parity: a population-based register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296725
Source
BJOG. 2017 Jul; 124(8):1235-1244
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
U Waldenström
S Cnattingius
L Vixner
M Norman
Author Affiliation
Division of Reproductive Health, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BJOG. 2017 Jul; 124(8):1235-1244
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Extremely Premature
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate whether advanced maternal age is associated with preterm birth, irrespective of parity.
Population-based registry study.
Swedish Medical Birth Register.
First, second, and third live singleton births to women aged 20 years or older in Sweden, from 1990 to 2011 (n = 2 009 068).
Logistic regression analysis was used in each parity group to estimate risks of very and moderately preterm births to women at 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, and 40 years or older, using 25-29 years as the reference group. Odds ratios (ORs) were adjusted for year of birth, education, country of birth, smoking, body mass index, and history of preterm birth. Age-related risks of spontaneous and medically indicated preterm births were also investigated.
Very preterm (22-31 weeks of gestation) and moderately preterm (32-36 weeks) births.
Risks of very preterm birth increased with maternal age, irrespective of parity: adjusted ORs in first, second, and third births ranged from 1.18 to 1.28 at 30-34 years, from 1.59 to 1.70 at 35-39 years, and from 1.97 to 2.40 at =40 years. In moderately preterm births, age-related associations were weaker, but were statistically significant from 35-39 years in all parity groups. Advanced maternal age increased the risks of both spontaneous and medically indicated preterm births.
Advanced maternal age is associated with an increased risk of preterm birth, irrespective of parity, especially very preterm birth. Women aged 35 years and older, expecting their first, second, or third births, should be regarded as a risk group for very preterm birth.
Women aged 35 years and older should be regarded as a risk group for very preterm birth, irrespective of parity.
Notes
CommentIn: BJOG. 2017 Jul;124(8):1245 PMID 28029213
PubMed ID
27770495 View in PubMed
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Adverse pregnancy outcomes in offspring of fathers working in biomedical research laboratories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82224
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2006 Jun;49(6):468-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Magnusson Linda L
Bodin Lennart
Wennborg Helena
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. linda.magnusson@biosciki.se
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2006 Jun;49(6):468-73
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biomedical Technology
Birth weight
Female
Humans
Laboratories
Logistic Models
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Paternal Exposure - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Registries
Solvents - adverse effects
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Laboratory work may constitute a possible health hazard for workers as well as for their offspring, and involves a wide range of exposures, such as organic solvents, carcinogenic agents, ionizing radiation, and/or microbiological agents. Adverse pregnancy outcomes in the offspring of male employees in biomedical research laboratories are examined. METHODS: Offspring to males employed 1970-1989 at four Swedish universities were identified via the Medical Birth Register (MBR), along with other pregnancy parameters. Offspring of fathers with laboratory work (n = 2,281) is considered exposed, and of non-laboratory employees unexposed (n = 1,909). Exposure data were obtained by questionnaires to research group leaders. Logistic regression analysis estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Paternal laboratory work in general showed no statistically significant increased ORs concerning birth weight and/or gestational age, but work specifically with radioactive isotopes gave OR 1.8 (CI 1.0-3.2) for high birth weight and a relative risk of 1.2 (CI 1.0-1.4) for sex ratio (male/female). CONCLUSIONS: There was no clear association between periconceptional paternal laboratory work and adverse reproductive outcomes, but use of radioactive isotopes showed increased OR for high birth weight in offspring.
PubMed ID
16691607 View in PubMed
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Airway function among Inuit primary school children in far northern Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3517
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Dec;156(6):1870-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
B. Hemmelgarn
P. Ernst
Author Affiliation
Respiratory Epidemiology Unit, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Dec;156(6):1870-5
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - ethnology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - ethnology - etiology - physiopathology
Child
Cotinine - analysis
Exertion
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - diagnosis - ethnology
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Premature
Inuits
Male
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Saliva - chemistry
Smoking
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Vital Capacity
Abstract
The study of the prevalence and determinants of asthma and allergy in different populations may provide clues to their etiology. We describe airway function and its determinants among Inuit schoolchildren living in far Northern Quebec. We assessed the presence of airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR), defined as a 15% drop in FEV1 with exercise, airflow obstruction, as judged by a reduced FEV1/FVC, and atopy, as evidenced by skin test positivity to inhaled aeroallergens, among 509 Inuit aged mostly from 6 to 13 yr. Smoking by the children (31.9%) and their parents was common, including maternal smoking during pregnancy (79.5%). Atopy was found in only 5.3% of children. Apart from age, there were no significant associations between AHR and any of the determinants examined. Airflow obstruction was present among 7.7% of children and occurred most commonly among children with higher levels of salivary cotinine and in those with four or more lower respiratory illnesses in the first 2 yr of life. Asthma and atopy were uncommon in this population whereas evidence of chronic airflow obstruction was frequently found. Measures to reduce the spread of respiratory infection and prevention of smoking are likely to be of most benefit in improving respiratory health in these isolated communities.
PubMed ID
9412568 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory blood pressure in young adults with very low birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148247
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Petteri Hovi
Sture Andersson
Katri Räikkönen
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Kati Heinonen
Riikka Pyhälä
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. petteri.hovi@helsinki.fi
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Odds Ratio
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
We hypothesized that, as compared with a matched control group born at term, young adults with very low birth weight (VLBW
PubMed ID
19796771 View in PubMed
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An association of maternal age and birth weight with end-stage renal disease in Saskatchewan. Sub-analysis of registered Indians and those with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183335
Source
Am J Nephrol. 2003 Nov-Dec;23(6):395-402
Publication Type
Article
Author
Roland Dyck
Helena Klomp
Leonard Tan
Mary Rose Stang
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Community Health, University of Saskatchewan, and Population Health Branch, Saskatchewan, Canada. dyck@sask.usask.ca
Source
Am J Nephrol. 2003 Nov-Dec;23(6):395-402
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Kidney Failure, Chronic - epidemiology
Male
Maternal Age
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine links between birth related factors and end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
This 1:3 age, sex, and source population (registered Indians [SkRI] and other Saskatchewan people [OSkP]) matched case-control study, compared maternal age and parity, gestational age, low birth weight (LBW), and high birth weight (HBW), between subjects with and without ESRD.
Of 1,162 subjects, 277 cases (48 SkRI and 229 OSkP) and 601 controls (112 SkRI and 489 OSkP) had birth weight information. A trend for increased LBW rates occurred among SkRI and OSkP cases compared to controls (10.4 vs. 5.3% and 6.6 vs. 4.3%), and was significant for OSkP female cases (OR 3.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05, 12.73). Higher HBW rates occurred in SkRI cases (14.6% compared to 11.6% controls; N/S), and 3/5 female SkRI diabetic ESRD (DESRD) cases were over 3,750 g compared to 1/14 controls (p /=30 years was an independent predictor for ESRD, particularly for OSkP non-DESRD cases (OR 2.45; 95% CI 1.03, 5.8). Cases with older mothers had lower mean birth weights than controls (3,236 vs. 3,434 g; p = 0.005).
Older maternal age may predispose offspring to ESRD through mechanisms that differ for DESRD versus non-DESRD, and that may relate to ethnicity.
PubMed ID
14555863 View in PubMed
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An increasing proportion of infants weigh more than 4000 grams at birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47667
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2001 Oct;80(10):931-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
J. Ørskou
U. Kesmodel
T B Henriksen
N J Secher
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Epidemiological Research Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. joerskou@hotmail.com
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2001 Oct;80(10):931-6
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Birth weight
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Fetal Macrosomia - epidemiology - etiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To investigate how mean birthweight has changed in the past decade, and to describe changes in the proportion of infants with a birthweight above 4000 grams (g). METHODS: We analyzed data on 43,561 singleton infants born between 1990 and 1999 at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Information on birthweight, gestational age, stillbirths, malformations, mode of delivery, prelabor intervention, and maternal diabetes was obtained from birth registration forms. RESULTS: For all infants mean birthweight increased by 45 g (95% CI: 20-70 g) from 3474 g in 1990 to 3519 g in 1999. For infants born at term the mean increase was 62 g (95% CI: 41-83 g). During the same period the percentage of infants born with a birthweight above 4000 g increased from 16.7% in 1990 to 20.0% in 1999 (p
PubMed ID
11580738 View in PubMed
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Antenatal steroid therapy for fetal lung maturation: is there an association with childhood asthma?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152796
Source
J Asthma. 2009 Feb;46(1):47-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Jason D Pole
Cameron A Mustard
Teresa To
Joseph Beyene
Alexander C Allen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. j.pole@utoronto.ca
Source
J Asthma. 2009 Feb;46(1):47-52
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Asthma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Fetal Organ Maturity - drug effects
Gestational Age
Humans
Hyaline Membrane Disease - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
This study was designed to test the hypothesis that fetal exposure to corticosteroids in the antenatal period is an independent risk factor for the development of asthma in childhood.
A population-based cohort study was conducted of all pregnant women who resided in Nova Scotia, Canada, and gave birth to a singleton fetus between January 1989 and December 1998 and lived to discharge. After exclusions, 79,395 infants were available for analysis. Using linked health care utilization records, incident asthma cases between 36 to 72 months of age were identified. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to estimate the odds ratio of the association between exposure to corticosteroids and asthma while controlling for confounders.
Over the 10 years of the study corticosteroid therapy increased by threefold. Exposure to corticosteroids during pregnancy was associated with a risk of asthma in childhood: adjusted odds ratio of 1.23 (95% confidence interval: 1.06, 1.44).
Antenatal steroid therapy appears to be an independent risk factor for the development of asthma between 36 and 72 months of age. Further research into the smallest possible steroid dose required to achieve the desired post-natal effect is needed to reduce the risk of developing childhood asthma.
PubMed ID
19191137 View in PubMed
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Antihypertensive medication use during pregnancy and the risk of major congenital malformations or small-for-gestational-age newborns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143835
Source
Birth Defects Res B Dev Reprod Toxicol. 2010 Apr;89(2):147-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
H R Nakhai-Pour
E. Rey
A. Bérard
Author Affiliation
University of Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Birth Defects Res B Dev Reprod Toxicol. 2010 Apr;89(2):147-54
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects
Birth Weight - drug effects
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology - etiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - drug therapy
Abstract
In spite of the widespread use of antihypertensives during pregnancy, data on their risks and benefits for the newborn are limited. We investigated the risk of major congenital malformations or small-for-gestational-age newborns (SGA) in relation to gestational use of antihypertensives.
Within the Quebec Pregnancy Registry, we conducted two case-control studies. First, cases were defined as major congenital malformations diagnosed during the first year of life and controls were selected from the same cohort; index date was date of delivery. Gestational exposure was defined as filling a prescription for an antihypertensive during the 1st trimester of pregnancy. Next, cases (SGA) were defined as newborns with a birth weight or =10 percentile. Gestational exposure was defined as filling a prescription for an antihypertensive during the 2nd or 3rd trimester. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI).
We found that overall antihypertensives use during the 2nd or 3rd trimesters of pregnancy was associated with a higher risk of SGA (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.17-1.99). Moreover, selective beta-blocker (OR 6.00, 95% CI 1.06-33.87), alpha beta blocker (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.04-4.88), or centrally-acting adrenergic agents use (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.00-2.89) was associated with a higher risk of SGA compared to non-use.
Gestational use of antihypertensives, especially beta-blocker, alpha beta blocker, or centrally-acting adrenergic agents, may increase the risk of SGA.
PubMed ID
20437474 View in PubMed
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317 records – page 1 of 32.