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Immigrants and preterm births: a nationwide epidemiological study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122273
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Aug;17(6):1052-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Xinjun Li
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Clinical Research Centre (CRC), Building 28, Entrance 72, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, 205 02 Malmö, Sweden. xinjun.li@med.lu.se
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Aug;17(6):1052-8
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine, nationwide, if there is an association between country of birth in mothers and preterm birth and to study whether any such association remains in second-generation immigrant women. In this follow-up study, a nationwide research database located at Lund University, Sweden, was used to identify all preterm born singletons in Sweden between January 1, 1982, and December 31, 2006. Incidence ratios were standardized with regard to maternal age at birth, marital status, geographical region, body height, and smoking history as well as period of birth, family income, and gender of the infant. Singletons of mothers born in Sweden were used as the reference group. There were 2,192,843 records for singletons over the study period, of whom 4.9 % were preterm births and 0.8 % were very preterm births. Increased risk of preterm birth was observed for mothers from Austria, Yugoslavia, Romania, Central Europe, and Asia. Increased risk of very preterm birth was observed for mothers from Eastern Europe, Central Europe, Africa, and Asia; these increased risk disappeared, however, in the second-generation female immigrants. Country of birth in mothers affected the risk of preterm birth; maternity care should pay special attention to women from certain population groups.
PubMed ID
22833337 View in PubMed
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Perinatal and familial risk factors for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a Swedish national cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263168
Source
Cancer. 2015 Apr 1;121(7):1040-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2015
Author
Casey Crump
Jan Sundquist
Weiva Sieh
Marilyn A Winkleby
Kristina Sundquist
Source
Cancer. 2015 Apr 1;121(7):1040-7
Date
Apr-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Order
Birth weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Fetal Development
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Perinatal care
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - epidemiology - etiology
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Perinatal factors including high birth weight have been found to be associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in case-control studies. However, to the best of our knowledge, these findings have seldom been examined in large population-based cohort studies, and the specific contributions of gestational age and fetal growth remain unknown.
The authors conducted a national cohort study of 3,569,333 individuals without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden between 1973 and 2008 and followed for the incidence of ALL through 2010 (maximum age, 38 years) to examine perinatal and familial risk factors.
There were 1960 ALL cases with 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. After adjusting for potential confounders, risk factors for ALL included high fetal growth (incidence rate ratio [IRR] per additional 1 standard deviation, 1.07; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.02-1.11 [P =.002]; and IRR for large vs appropriate for gestational age, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06-1.40 [P =.005]), first-degree family history of ALL (IRR, 7.41; 95% CI, 4.60-11.95 [P
Notes
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PubMed ID
25417823 View in PubMed
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Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272550
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Dec;30(12):1277-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Casey Crump
Jan Sundquist
Weiva Sieh
Marilyn A Winkleby
Kristina Sundquist
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Dec;30(12):1277-85
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Order
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Fetal Development
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Gestational Age
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Maternal Age
Perinatal care
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Registries
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
26113060 View in PubMed
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Perinatal risk factors for premature ischaemic heart disease in a Swedish national cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270809
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(6):e007308
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Bengt Zöller
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Casey Crump
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(6):e007308
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Body Height
Cohort Studies
Female
Fetal Development
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Several studies have reported associations between restricted fetal development, as shown by birth weight or birth length, and later ischaemic heart disease (IHD). However, few studies have examined the importance of these perinatal factors when taking into account gestational age at birth, hereditary factors, sociodemographic factors and comorbidities. This study investigated the importance of perinatal risk factors for premature IHD and myocardial infarction (MI) in a large Swedish cohort.
National cohort study of 1,970,869 individuals who were live-born in Sweden in 1973 through 1992, and followed up to 2010 (ages 18-38 years).
The main outcome was IHD, and the secondary outcome was MI.
A total of 668 individuals were diagnosed with IHD in 18.8 million person-years of follow-up. After adjusting for gestational age at birth, sociodemographic factors, comorbidities and family history of IHD, low fetal growth was associated with increased risk of IHD (HR for
Notes
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PubMed ID
26038357 View in PubMed
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Perinatal risk factors for Wilms tumor in a Swedish national cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105025
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Mar;29(3):191-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Casey Crump
Jan Sundquist
Weiva Sieh
Marilyn A Winkleby
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Stanford University, 211 Quarry Road, Suite 405, MC 5985, Palo Alto, CA, 94304-1426, USA, kccrump@stanford.edu.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Mar;29(3):191-7
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Birth Order
Birth weight
Female
Fetal Development
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wilms Tumor - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Perinatal risk factors including high birth weight have been associated with Wilms tumor in case-control studies. However, these findings have seldom been examined in large cohort studies, and the specific contributions of gestational age at birth and fetal growth remain unknown. We conducted the largest population-based cohort study to date consisting of 3,571,574 persons born in Sweden in 1973-2008, followed up for Wilms tumor incidence through 2009 to examine perinatal risk factors. There were 443 Wilms tumor cases identified in 66.3 million person-years of follow-up. After adjusting for gestational age and other perinatal factors, high fetal growth was associated with increased risk of Wilms tumor among girls (hazard ratio per 1 standard deviation (SD), 1.36; 95% CI 1.20-1.54; P
PubMed ID
24510487 View in PubMed
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Season of birth and risk of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258864
Source
Int J Cancer. 2014 Dec 1;135(11):2735-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2014
Author
Casey Crump
Jan Sundquist
Weiva Sieh
Marilyn A Winkleby
Kristina Sundquist
Source
Int J Cancer. 2014 Dec 1;135(11):2735-9
Date
Dec-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth Order
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hodgkin Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Prognosis
Registries
Risk factors
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (HL and NHL) in early life, but findings to date for specific lymphomas and periods of susceptibility are conflicting. We conducted the first national cohort study to examine whether season of birth, a proxy for infectious exposures in the first few months of life, is associated with HL or NHL in childhood through young adulthood. A total of 3,571,574 persons born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up through 2009 to examine the association between season of birth and incidence of HL (943 cases) or NHL (936 cases). We found a sinusoidal pattern in NHL risk by season of birth (p?=?0.04), with peak risk occurring among birthdates in April. Relative to persons born in fall (September-November), odds ratios for NHL by season of birth were 1.25 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-1.50; p?=?0.02] for spring (March-May), 1.22 (95% CI, 1.01-1.48; p?=?0.04) for summer (June-August) and 1.11 (95% CI, 0.91-1.35; p?=?0.29) for winter (December-February). These findings did not vary by sex, age at diagnosis or major subtypes. In contrast, there was no seasonal association between birthdate and risk of HL (p?=?0.78). In this large cohort study, birth in spring or summer was associated with increased risk of NHL (but not HL) in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of delayed infectious exposures compared with fall or winter birth. These findings suggest that immunologic responses in early infancy may play an important role in the development of NHL.
PubMed ID
24752499 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.