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A 1-year follow-up of low birth weight infants with and without bronchopulmonary dysplasia: health, growth, clinical lung disease, cardiovascular and neurological sequelae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59584
Source
Early Hum Dev. 1992 Sep;30(2):109-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992

A 10-year follow up of reproductive function in women treated for childhood cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113054
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2013 Aug;27(2):192-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
S N Nielsen
A N Andersen
K T Schmidt
C. Rechnitzer
K. Schmiegelow
J G Bentzen
E C Larsen
Author Affiliation
The Fertility Clinic, The Juliane Marie Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2013 Aug;27(2):192-200
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - blood - chemically induced - etiology - pathology
Adult
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infertility, Female - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Live Birth
Menstruation Disturbances - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Neoplasms - complications - drug therapy - radiotherapy
Ovary - drug effects - pathology - radiation effects
Pregnancy
Primary Ovarian Insufficiency - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Remission Induction
Risk
Survivors
Young Adult
Abstract
Previously, this study group found that female childhood cancer survivors could be at risk of early cessation of fertility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate reproductive function in the same group of survivors 10 years after the initial study. Of the original cohort of 100, 71 were re-examined. Thirty-six survivors reported regular menstrual cycles. When they were compared with 210 controls, they differed significantly in antral follicle count (AFC) (median 15 versus 18, P=0.047) but not in anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) (median 13.0 versus 17.8 pmol/l). Survivors cured with minimal gonadotoxic treatment had significantly higher AMH and AFC compared with survivors cured with either potentially gonadotoxic treatment or treatment including alkylating chemotherapy and ovarian irradiation (20.0, 5.8 and
PubMed ID
23768622 View in PubMed
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A 14-year follow-up of children with normal and abnormal birth weight for their gestational age. A population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239462
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Jan;74(1):62-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1985
Author
P. Rantakallio
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Jan;74(1):62-9
Date
Jan-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth weight
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology
Child Development
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology
Male
Mortality
Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Mortality, major neurological handicaps--including mental retardation, cerebral palsy and epilepsy--educational subnormality and height at 14 years of age were studied by birth weight percentiles in a birth cohort of 12 000 children from northern Finland. Infant mortality was significantly higher below the mean -2 SD, 10th and 25th percentiles, than in the median class, from 25th to 75th percentiles, but mortality from one to 14 years only in the lowest weight class. Educational subnormality, including mental retardation +/- some other handicap, was highly significantly more frequent in all the percentile classes lower than the median class but showed no significant tendency to be less frequent in the percentiles over the median. It was also highly significantly more frequent among the preterm than the term infant. The number of children with a major neurological handicap but normal school performance did not vary significantly by birth weight percentiles or by gestational age. Height at 14 years increased significantly by birth weight percentiles. The height of the boys with birth weight mean - and +2 SD was nevertheless within the 25th-75th percentiles for height at 14 years in general, while the height of the girls came close to these percentile limits. The preterm infants were significantly shorter than the term infants at 14 years.
PubMed ID
3984729 View in PubMed
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40-year follow-up of overweight children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38058
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-1989
Author
H O Mossberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Date
Aug-26-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Birth weight
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - genetics - mortality
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Reference Standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
504 overweight children admitted to hospital between 1921 and 1947 were followed up for 40 years by questionnaires at 10 year intervals. The mean weight for height (W/H) standard deviation score (SDS) reached a maximum in puberty (+3.5). The SDS fell to about +1 in adulthood. 47% patients were still obese (SDS greater than +1) in adulthood; 84.6% of these had SDS more than +2 in childhood. The degree of obesity in the family (parents and grandparents) and the degree of overweight in puberty were the most important factors for weight level in adulthood. Even when their food intake was in accordance with recommended levels, obese children had higher than normal weight as adults. Excessive overweight in puberty (SDS greater than +3) was associated with higher than expected morbidity and mortality in adult life. Weight-reducing measures should be started early in life to improve the unfavourable long-term prognosis for very obese children.
PubMed ID
2570196 View in PubMed
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Adherence to medical treatment in relation to pregnancy, birth outcome & breastfeeding behavior among women with Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280216
Source
Dan Med J. 2016 Jul;63(7)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Mette Julsgaard
Source
Dan Med J. 2016 Jul;63(7)
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Birth weight
Breast Feeding - psychology
Crohn Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Patient compliance
Pilot Projects
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Pregnancy outcome
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Crohn's disease (CD) is common among women of fertile age, and it often requires maintenance medical treatment. Adherence to medical treatment among women with CD prior to, during, and after pregnancy has, however, never been examined. Although CD women have increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, little is known about predictors for these outcomes in women with CD. In addition, the impact of breastfeeding on disease activity remains controversial.
The aims of this PhD thesis were to determine adherence to treatment and to investigate predictors for and prevalence rates of non-adherence to maintenance medical treatment among women with CD prior to, during, and after pregnancy; to assess pregnancy outcomes among women with CD, taking medical treatment, smoking status, and disease activity into account; to assess breastfeeding rates and the impact of breastfeeding on the risk of relapse.
We conducted a population-based prevalence study including 154 women with CD who had given birth within a six-year period. We combined questionnaire data, data from medical records, and medical register data.
Among 105 (80%) respondents, more than half reported taking medication with an overall high adherence rate of 69.8%. Counselling, previous pregnancy, and planned pregnancy seemed to decrease the likelihood of non-adherence, whereas smoking seemed to predict non-adherence prior to pregnancy, although our sample size prevented any firm conclusions. During pregnancy, the vast majority (95%) of CD women were in remission. The children's birth weight did not differ in relation to maternal medical treatment, but mean birth weight in children of smokers in medical treatment was 274 g lower than that of children of non-smokers in medical treatment. In our relatively small study CD women in medical treatment were not at increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes compared with untreated women with CD. In total, 87.6% of CD women were breastfeeding, and rates did not vary by medical treatment. Smoking and non-adherence seemed to predict relapse in CD during the postpartum period, whereas breastfeeding seemed protective against relapse.  
Although we generally had low statistical precision this thesis suggests that counselling regarding medical treatment may be an important factor for medical adherence among CD women of fertile age. In addition CD women in medical treatment did not seem at increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcome, but smoking predicted lower birth weight. Breastfeeding did not seem to increase the risk of relapse in CD.
PubMed ID
27399984 View in PubMed
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Advanced pubertal growth spurt in subjects born preterm: the Helsinki study of very low birth weight adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138699
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Feb;96(2):525-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Karoliina Wehkalampi
Petteri Hovi
Leo Dunkel
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Sture Andersson
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 30, Mannerheimintie 164, 00271 Helsinki, Finland. karoliina.wehkalampi@helsinki.fi
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Feb;96(2):525-33
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Growth - physiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - physiology
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight - physiology
Male
Menarche - physiology
Parents
Pregnancy
Puberty - physiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Voice - physiology
Abstract
Among people born at term, low birth weight is associated with early puberty. Early maturation may be on the pathway linking low birth weight with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Subjects born preterm with very low birth weight (VLBW;
PubMed ID
21147886 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory blood pressure in young adults with very low birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148247
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Petteri Hovi
Sture Andersson
Katri Räikkönen
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Kati Heinonen
Riikka Pyhälä
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. petteri.hovi@helsinki.fi
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Odds Ratio
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
We hypothesized that, as compared with a matched control group born at term, young adults with very low birth weight (VLBW
PubMed ID
19796771 View in PubMed
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An observational study comparing 2-hour 75-g oral glucose tolerance with fasting plasma glucose in pregnant women: both poorly predictive of birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186618
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):403-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-2003
Author
Christian Ouzilleau
Marie-Andrée Roy
Louiselle Leblanc
André Carpentier
Pierre Maheux
Author Affiliation
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC.
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):403-9
Date
Feb-18-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Diabetes, Gestational - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Infant, Newborn
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Mass Screening
Maternal Welfare
Parity
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Quebec
ROC Curve
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Smoking
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
The definition and treatment of glucose intolerance during pregnancy are matters of intense controversy. Our goal was to examine the value of the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in terms of its ability to predict birth weight percentile in a group of women with singleton pregnancies who received minimal treatment for their glucose intolerance.
We reviewed the results of OGTTs performed between 24 and 28 weeks' gestation in a group of 300 consecutive high-risk women (mean age 29.5 years [95% confidence interval, CI, 28.9-30.1]; parity 1.5 [95% CI 1.4-1.7]) whose plasma glucose level 1 hour after a randomly administered 50-g glucose load was 8.0 mmol/L or above. These data were compared with results for a randomly selected control group of 300 women whose plasma glucose level 1 hour after a 50-g glucose load was less than 8.0 mmol/L (mean age 28.0 years [95% CI 27.4-28.6]; parity 1.5 [95% CI 1.3-1.6]).
For 76 (25.3%) of the 300 high-risk women, the plasma glucose level 2 hours after a 75-g glucose load (confirmatory OGTT) was 7.8 mmol/L or more, but only 6 of these were treated with insulin, which emphasizes the low level of intervention in this group. Thirty (10.0%) of the neonates in this group were large for gestational age (LGA; adjusted weight at or above the 90th percentile). This proportion did not significantly differ from the proportion for the control group (25 or 8.3%). After exclusion of the 6 insulin-treated women, simple correlations between birth weight percentile and fasting or 2-hour plasma glucose levels were very weak (r = 0.23 and 0.16 respectively; p
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):421-512591782
Comment In: CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):429-3112591783
PubMed ID
12591779 View in PubMed
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[A retrospective study of breech deliveries at Kongsberg Hospital, 1965-1974]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60771
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1977 Oct 10;97(28):1438-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-1977

Assessment of reproductive history in systemic sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154487
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2008 Nov 15;59(11):1661-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2008
Author
Sasha Bernatsky
Marie Hudson
Janet Pope
Evelyne Vinet
Janet Markland
David Robinson
Niall Jones
Peter Docherty
Maysan Abu-Hakima
Sharon Leclercq
James Dunne
Douglas Smith
Jean-Pierre Mathieu
Nader Khalidi
Evelyn Sutton
Murray Baron
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. sasha.bernatsky@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2008 Nov 15;59(11):1661-4
Date
Nov-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Birth rate
Canada
Cohort Studies
Cyclophosphamide - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Reproduction - physiology
Reproductive history
Scleroderma, Systemic - drug therapy - physiopathology
Abstract
To assess the number of live births in women whose systemic sclerosis (SSc) onset occurred during their reproductive years, and to compare this with general population rates.
Within the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group cohort, we identified 320 women whose SSc symptoms began prior to age 50 years. We determined the number of children born in the years following first onset of symptoms. We summed the years of followup from the time of first symptoms in subjects up to age 50 years (or oldest age attained, if the subject was age
PubMed ID
18975360 View in PubMed
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356 records – page 1 of 36.