Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Associations between birth characteristics and age-related cognitive impairment and dementia: A registry-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299338
Source
PLoS Med. 2018 07; 15(7):e1002609
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Date
07-2018
Author
Miriam A Mosing
Cecilia Lundholm
Sven Cnattingius
Margaret Gatz
Nancy L Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
PLoS Med. 2018 07; 15(7):e1002609
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Birth weight
Cephalometry
Cognition
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cognitive Aging
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Gestational Age
Head - anatomy & histology
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
There is evidence for long-lasting effects of birth characteristics on cognitive ability in childhood and adulthood. Further, low cognitive ability throughout the lifetime has been linked to age-related cognitive decline and dementia risk. However, little is known about the effects of birth characteristics on cognitive dysfunction late in life. Here we explore potential associations between birth characteristics (weight, head circumference, length, and gestational age), adjusted and not adjusted for gestational age, and cognitive impairment and dementia late in life.
Data from twins in the Swedish Twin Registry born 1926-1960 were merged with information from the Swedish birth, patient, and cause of death registries, resulting in a sample of 35,191 individuals. A subsample of 4,000 twins aged 65 years and older also participated in a telephone cognitive screening in 1998-2002. Associations of birth characteristics with registry-based dementia diagnoses and on telephone-assessed cognitive impairment were investigated in the full sample and subsample, respectively. The full sample contained 907 (2.6%) individuals with a dementia diagnosis (an incidence rate of 5.9% per 100,000 person-years), 803 (2.4%) individuals born small for gestational age, and 929 (2.8%) individuals born with a small head for gestational age. The subsample contained 569 (14.2%) individuals with cognitive impairment. Low birth weight for gestational age and being born with a small head for gestational age were significant risk factors for cognitive dysfunction late in life, with an up to 2-fold risk increase (p
PubMed ID
30020924 View in PubMed
Less detail

Validity of Self-Reported Birth Weight: Results from a Norwegian Twin Sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289455
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2017 10; 20(5):406-413
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Validation Studies
Date
10-2017
Author
Thomas S Nilsen
Julia Kutschke
Ingunn Brandt
Jennifer R Harris
Author Affiliation
Department for Cohort Studies,Norwegian Institute of Public Health,Oslo,Norway.
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2017 10; 20(5):406-413
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Birth weight
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Self Report
Twins
Abstract
The association between birth weight and later life outcomes is of considerable interest in life-course epidemiology. Research often relies on self-reported measures of birth weight, and its validity is consequently of importance. We assessed agreement between self-reported birth weight and official birth records for Norwegian twins born 1967-1974. The intraclass correlation between self-reported birth weight and register-based birth weight was 0.91 in our final sample of 363 twins. It could be expected that 95% of self-reported birth-weight values will deviate from official records within a maximum of +446 grams and a minimum of -478 grams - around a mean deviation of 16 grams. Self-reported birth weight had a sensitivity of 0.78-0.89 and a positive predictive value of 0.59-0.85, and an overall weighted kappa of 0.71. We further assessed agreement by conducting two linear regression models where we respectively regressed self-reported birth weight and register-based birth weight on adult body mass index, a known association. The two models were not significantly different; however, there were different levels of significance in parameter estimates that warrant some caution in using self-reported birth weight. Reliability of self-reported birth weight was also assessed, based on self-reports in another sample of twins born 1935-1960 who had reported their birth weight in two questionnaires 34 years apart. The intraclass correlation was 0.86, which indicates a high degree of reliability. In conclusion, self-reported birth weight, depending on context and age when birth weight was reported, can be cautiously used.
PubMed ID
28868992 View in PubMed
Less detail

Validity of Self-Reported Birth Weight: Results from a Norwegian Twin Sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289613
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2017 10; 20(5):406-413
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Validation Studies
Date
10-2017
Author
Thomas S Nilsen
Julia Kutschke
Ingunn Brandt
Jennifer R Harris
Author Affiliation
Department for Cohort Studies,Norwegian Institute of Public Health,Oslo,Norway.
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2017 10; 20(5):406-413
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Birth weight
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Self Report
Twins
Abstract
The association between birth weight and later life outcomes is of considerable interest in life-course epidemiology. Research often relies on self-reported measures of birth weight, and its validity is consequently of importance. We assessed agreement between self-reported birth weight and official birth records for Norwegian twins born 1967-1974. The intraclass correlation between self-reported birth weight and register-based birth weight was 0.91 in our final sample of 363 twins. It could be expected that 95% of self-reported birth-weight values will deviate from official records within a maximum of +446 grams and a minimum of -478 grams - around a mean deviation of 16 grams. Self-reported birth weight had a sensitivity of 0.78-0.89 and a positive predictive value of 0.59-0.85, and an overall weighted kappa of 0.71. We further assessed agreement by conducting two linear regression models where we respectively regressed self-reported birth weight and register-based birth weight on adult body mass index, a known association. The two models were not significantly different; however, there were different levels of significance in parameter estimates that warrant some caution in using self-reported birth weight. Reliability of self-reported birth weight was also assessed, based on self-reports in another sample of twins born 1935-1960 who had reported their birth weight in two questionnaires 34 years apart. The intraclass correlation was 0.86, which indicates a high degree of reliability. In conclusion, self-reported birth weight, depending on context and age when birth weight was reported, can be cautiously used.
PubMed ID
28868992 View in PubMed
Less detail