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A 14-year follow-up of children with normal and abnormal birth weight for their gestational age. A population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239462
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Jan;74(1):62-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1985
Author
P. Rantakallio
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Jan;74(1):62-9
Date
Jan-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth weight
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology
Child Development
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology
Male
Mortality
Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Mortality, major neurological handicaps--including mental retardation, cerebral palsy and epilepsy--educational subnormality and height at 14 years of age were studied by birth weight percentiles in a birth cohort of 12 000 children from northern Finland. Infant mortality was significantly higher below the mean -2 SD, 10th and 25th percentiles, than in the median class, from 25th to 75th percentiles, but mortality from one to 14 years only in the lowest weight class. Educational subnormality, including mental retardation +/- some other handicap, was highly significantly more frequent in all the percentile classes lower than the median class but showed no significant tendency to be less frequent in the percentiles over the median. It was also highly significantly more frequent among the preterm than the term infant. The number of children with a major neurological handicap but normal school performance did not vary significantly by birth weight percentiles or by gestational age. Height at 14 years increased significantly by birth weight percentiles. The height of the boys with birth weight mean - and +2 SD was nevertheless within the 25th-75th percentiles for height at 14 years in general, while the height of the girls came close to these percentile limits. The preterm infants were significantly shorter than the term infants at 14 years.
PubMed ID
3984729 View in PubMed
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Association of perinatal events, epilepsy, and central nervous system trauma with juvenile delinquency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222616
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1992 Dec;67(12):1459-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
P. Rantakallio
M. Koiranen
J. Möttönen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1992 Dec;67(12):1459-61
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth weight
Brain Injuries - complications
Dangerous Behavior
Epilepsy - complications
Female
Finland
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The association of perinatal events, childhood epilepsy, and central nervous system trauma with juvenile delinquency was studied prospectively in a geographically defined population of 5966 males in northern Finland. Those who had obtained a criminal record up to the age of 22 years, totalling 355, or 6.0%, were defined as delinquents. The incidence of delinquency was not increased in males with a birth weight less than 2500 g or greater than 4000 g, preterm births
Notes
Cites: Dis Nerv Syst. 1977 Nov;38(11):907-8913225
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1988 Jan;2(1):59-882976931
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1985 Dec;39(4):353-64086968
Cites: Neurology. 1980 Mar;30(3):304-77189030
Cites: Am J Ment Defic. 1986 Jan;90(4):380-72936240
Cites: Early Hum Dev. 1987 Mar;15(2):75-843595479
Cites: Eur J Pediatr. 1985 Jul;144(2):149-514043124
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1962 Mar;118:781-9413917550
PubMed ID
1489225 View in PubMed
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Changes in fertility and the acceptability of pregnancies in northern Finland during the last 20 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37760
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1990 Mar;19(1):109-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
P. Rantakallio
A. Myhrman
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1990 Mar;19(1):109-14
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal
Attitude
Birth rate
Cohort Studies
Female
Fertility
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted
Abstract
The acceptability of pregnancies was studied in two birth cohorts in Northern Finland which represent 96% of all births in the region in 1966 (12,068 births) and 99% (9362 births) in 1985-1986. The numbers of women of fertile age in the area during these years were 148,000 and 158,000, so that fertility may be said to have fallen from 81 to 59 per 1000. The pregnancy was wanted in 63.0% of cases and unwanted in 12.2% in 1966, the rest being classified as accepted later. The corresponding figures in 1985-1986 were 91.8% and 1.0%. The latter figures changed very little when maternal age, parity and social class were standardized to the 1966 levels. Acceptability was connected with age, in that the age groups in which childbearing was most frequent, 20-25 years in 1966 and 26-30 years in 1985-1986, had the highest incidence of desired pregnancies. In spite of the fact that there were 1.4 times as many births per woman aged 15-49 years in the former cohort, more wanted children were born to the age group 25-34 years in the latter cohort. The percentage of wanted pregnancies also varied with the woman's parity, social class and marital status. The children in the 1966 cohort were followed until the age of 14 and the incidences of cerebral palsy (CP) and mental retardation (IQ less than 71) were 3.2 times higher among the unwanted children than among the wanted ones.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2351504 View in PubMed
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Ecological and individual predictors of birthweight in a northern Finland birth cohort 1986.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59068
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1997 Jul;11(3):298-312
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
M R Järvelin
P. Elliott
I. Kleinschmidt
M. Martuzzi
C. Grundy
A L Hartikainen
P. Rantakallio
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1997 Jul;11(3):298-312
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Birth weight
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Linear Models
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - epidemiology
Space-Time Clustering
Topography, Medical
Abstract
This multilevel study of spatial variability in, and determinants of, birthweight was conducted using individual and ecological data in a geographically defined prospective birth cohort for 1986 in northern Finland. The study area comprises three large areas defined by latitude: Northern Lapland (NL), Southern Lapland (SL) and Oulu province (OP), comprising 74 localities with a total study population of 9216 singleton births. The mean birthweight was 3482 g for NL, 3537 g for SL and 3587 g for OP (NL vs. OP and SL vs. OP: P
PubMed ID
9246691 View in PubMed
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Educational capacity of low birth weight children up to the age of 24.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35830
Source
Early Hum Dev. 1994 Apr 15;36(3):191-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1994
Author
P. Olsén
A. Myhrman
P. Rantakallio
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Early Hum Dev. 1994 Apr 15;36(3):191-203
Date
Apr-15-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cerebral Palsy
Educational Status
Epilepsy
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mental retardation
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
Participation in further education after compulsory schooling was examined for 377 LBW (low birth weight, or = 2500 g) children and completion of this further education among the same population in a 1-year birth cohort for Northern Finland in 1966. There was no difference in enrollment for further education, the percentage for non-enrollment was 8.5% for LBW and 7.0% for NBW children, and the healthy LBW children even enrolled more often than the healthy NBW children. Enrollment among the disabled LBW children, however, was significantly poorer than among the disabled NBW children, 57.1% and 36.8%, respectively failing to enroll. The disabled LBW girls in particular enrolled poorly, 76.9% of them failing to do so. Completing further studies up to the age of 24 was rarer among the LBW children than among the NBW children, 17.6% of them failing to graduate compared to 13.8% of the NBW children. If the disabled children were excluded, however, the healthy LBW children succeeded as well as the healthy NBW children. The LBW girls, especially the disabled ones, graduated the least often. When excluding the disabled children and controlling confounding variables by stratification, low birth weight did not affect non-enrollment or non-graduation. Altogether, the success of the LBW children in their post compulsory education was satisfactory except for the disabled LBW children, especially the girls.
PubMed ID
8062785 View in PubMed
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Fitting mixture models to birth weight data: a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59706
Source
Biometrics. 1991 Sep;47(3):883-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
H. Oja
M. Koiranen
P. Rantakallio
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Biometrics. 1991 Sep;47(3):883-97
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mathematics
Models, Statistical
Probability
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Birth weights by gestational age are compared in two birth cohorts from Northern Finland, the first from 1966 and the second from 1985-1986. A curious fact in the data is that mean birth weight before the 39th week was lower in the latter series although the mean birth weight for the total series was higher. Similar findings have been reported in other series. A mixture model with the nonparametric regression function is proposed for studying the hypothesis that the difference was caused by more frequent gross errors in gestational assessment in the earlier cohort. The probability of an error in gestational assessment then greatly depends on the observed gestational age, which makes the mixture model nonstandard. Maximum likelihood solutions to the parameters in the proposed model were computed employing the general expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. A technique for studying the effect of errors on the intrauterine weight gain curve is proposed and applied to our two birth cohorts. The risk of underestimation of gestational age seems to be larger in the previous series and the differences between the growth curves almost totally vanish when "corrected" by means of the mixture model.
PubMed ID
1742444 View in PubMed
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Has the intrauterine weight-gain curve changed in shape?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59746
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1991 Apr;5(2):201-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
P. Rantakallio
H. Oja
M. Koiranen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1991 Apr;5(2):201-10
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Embryonic and Fetal Development
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PubMed ID
2052482 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.