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Associations of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with pregnancy outcome and postpartum weight retention: a prospective observational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260815
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:201
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Margaretha Haugen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Anna Winkvist
Lauren Lissner
Jan Alexander
Bente Oftedal
Per Magnus
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:201
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Body mass index
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Emergencies
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Institute of Medicine (U.S.)
Live Birth - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Parity
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Thinness - epidemiology
United States
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with pregnancy complications, and Norwegian Health Authorities have adopted the GWG recommendations of the US Institute of Medicine and National Research Council (IOM). The aim of this study was to evaluate if a GWG outside the IOM recommendation in a Norwegian population is associated with increased risk of pregnancy complications like hypertension, low and high birth weight, preeclampsia, emergency caesarean delivery, and maternal post-partum weight retention (PPWR) at 6 and 18 months.
This study was performed in 56 101 pregnant women included in the prospective national Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) in the years 1999 to 2008. Women who delivered a singleton live born child during gestational week 37 to 42 were included. Maternal prepregnant and postpartum weight was collected from questionnaires at 17th week of gestation and 6 and 18 months postpartum.
A weight gain less than the IOM recommendations (GWG??IOM rec.) significantly increased the risk of pregnancy hypertension, a high birth weight baby, preeclampsia and emergency cesarean delivery in both nulliparous and parous normal weight women. Similar results were found for overweight women except for no increased risk for gestational hypertension in parous women with GWG?>?IOM rec. Seventy-four percent of the overweight nulliparous women and 66% of the obese women had a GWG?>?IOM rec. A GWG?>?IOM rec. resulted in increased risk of PPWR?>?2 kg in all weight classes, but most women attained their prepregnant weight class by 18 months post-partum.
For prepregnant normal weight and overweight women a GWG?>?IOM rec. increased the risk for unfavorable birth outcomes in both nulliparous and parous women. A GWG?>?IOM rec. increased the risk of a PPWR?>?2 kg at 18 months in all weight classes. This large study supports the Norwegian Health authorities' recommendations for normal weight and overweight women to comply with the IOM rec.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24917037 View in PubMed
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Caffeine exposure during pregnancy, small for gestational age birth and neonatal outcome - results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301107
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2019 Feb 26; 19(1):80
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-26-2019
Author
Dominika Modzelewska
Rino Bellocco
Anders Elfvin
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Bo Jacobsson
Verena Sengpiel
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, SE-416 85, Gothenburg, Sweden. dominika.modzelewska@gu.se.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2019 Feb 26; 19(1):80
Date
Feb-26-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Weight - drug effects
Caffeine - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - chemically induced
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Logistic Models
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Norway
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - chemically induced
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Maternal caffeine intake has repeatedly been linked to babies being born small for gestational age (SGA). SGA babies are known to be at increased risk for adverse neonatal outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the associations between prenatal caffeine exposure and neonatal health.
The study is based on 67,569 full-term singleton mother-infant pairs from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Caffeine consumption from different sources was self-reported in gestational week 22. Neonatal compound outcomes, namely (1) morbidity/mortality and (2) neonatal intervention, were created based on the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Adjusted logistic regression was performed.
Caffeine exposure was associated to SGA (OR?=?1.16, 95%CI: 1.10; 1.23) and being born SGA was significantly associated with neonatal health (OR?=?3.09, 95%CI: 2.54; 3.78 for morbidity/mortality; OR?=?3.94, 95%CI: 3.50; 4.45 for intervention). However, prenatal caffeine exposure was neither associated with neonatal morbidity/mortality (OR?=?1.01, 95%CI: 0.96; 1.07) nor neonatal intervention (OR?=?1.02, 95%CI: 1.00; 1.05 for a 100?mg caffeine intake increase). Results did not change after additional adjustment for SGA status.
Moderate prenatal caffeine exposure (
PubMed ID
30808339 View in PubMed
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Dietary benzo(a)pyrene intake during pregnancy and birth weight: associations modified by vitamin C intakes in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107027
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:217-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Talita Duarte-Salles
Michelle A Mendez
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jan Alexander
Margaretha Haugen
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: duartesallest@fellows.iarc.fr.
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Oct;60:217-23
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ascorbic Acid - pharmacology
Benzo(a)pyrene - administration & dosage - analysis - toxicity
Birth Weight - drug effects
Child
Cohort Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fetal Development - drug effects
Food - classification
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Heredodegenerative Disorders, Nervous System - chemically induced
Humans
Infant
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Microphthalmos - chemically induced
Multivariate Analysis
Mutagenicity Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Parity
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Abstract
Maternal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) during pregnancy has been associated with reduced fetal growth. However, the role of diet, the main source of PAH exposure among non-smokers, remains uncertain.
To assess associations between maternal exposure to dietary intake of the genotoxic PAH benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] during pregnancy and birth weight, exploring potential effect modification by dietary intakes of vitamins C, E and A, hypothesized to influence PAH metabolism.
This study included 50,651 women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Dietary B(a)P and nutrient intakes were estimated based on total consumption obtained from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and estimated based on food composition data. Data on infant birth weight were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN). Multivariate regression was used to assess associations between dietary B(a)P and birth weight, evaluating potential interactions with candidate nutrients.
The multivariate-adjusted coefficient (95%CI) for birth weight associated with maternal energy-adjusted B(a)P intake was -20.5g (-31.1, -10.0) in women in the third compared with the first tertile of B(a)P intake. Results were similar after excluding smokers. Significant interactions were found between elevated intakes of vitamin C (>85mg/day) and dietary B(a)P during pregnancy for birth weight (P
PubMed ID
24071023 View in PubMed
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Effect of dietary factors in pregnancy on risk of pregnancy complications: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134772
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Dec;94(6 Suppl):1970S-1974S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Roy M Nilsen
Per Magnus
Jan Alexander
Margareta Haugen
Author Affiliation
Divisions of Environmental Medicine and Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. helle.margrete.meltzer@fhi.no
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Dec;94(6 Suppl):1970S-1974S
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Diet, Mediterranean
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Food Habits
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Premature Birth - metabolism
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
There has been a thrilling development , as well as profound changes, in our understanding of the effect of fetal nutrition on the development and health of the child. The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) is an ongoing nationwide population-based pregnancy cohort study that between 1999 and 2008 recruited 90,723 women with 106,981 pregnancies and 108,487 children. The objective of MoBa is to test specific etiologic hypotheses by estimating the association between exposures and diseases with a special focus on disorders that may originate in early life. An important aspect in this regard is maternal diet and nutritional status during pregnancy. Nutritional factors have long been considered to be important determinants of maternal and fetal health, and dietary information is currently being collected in a number of pregnancy cohorts in Europe and the United States. Thus far, pregnancy complications studied in MoBa are preterm birth, preeclampsia, and fetal growth; and the aim of this article is to report results of recently published studies of dietary factors in relation to these outcomes. Numerous studies are planned using MoBa data, and the aim is to add to the knowledge of the interplay between dietary factors, nonnutrients, and toxic dietary substances and epigenetic modulation on fetal development and health later in life.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21543541 View in PubMed
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Folic acid supplementation and interpregnancy interval.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259381
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2014 May;28(3):270-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Roy Miodini Nilsen
Pierpaolo Mastroiacovo
Nina Gunnes
Elin R Alsaker
Anne Lise Bjørke-Monsen
Simone J P M Eussen
Margaretha Haugen
Ane Johannessen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Camilla Stoltenberg
Per Magne Ueland
Stein Emil Vollset
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2014 May;28(3):270-4
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Intervals
Dietary Supplements
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Folic Acid Deficiency - complications - diet therapy
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neural Tube Defects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Norway - epidemiology
Preconception Care
Pregnancy
Premature Birth
Prospective Studies
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Maternal folic acid supplementation between subsequent pregnancies may be important to reduce the risk of low folate status associated with short interpregnancy intervals. We examined how the prevalence of preconception folic acid use for a given pregnancy in Norwegian women varied according to the time interval from the previous pregnancy.
Analysis was based on 48?855 pairs of pregnancies with the second pregnancy included in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (birth years 1999-2009). Interpregnancy interval was defined as the time from birth of a child to the conception of the subsequent sibling. Preconception folic acid use was defined as any use of folic acid-containing supplements within the last 4 weeks before the second pregnancy.
The prevalence of preconception folic acid use was 31%. Among women with a term birth (=37 weeks) in the previous pregnancy (92%), those with interpregnancy intervals =12 and =49 months were associated with up to 35% lower prevalence of preconception folic acid use for the second pregnancy, relative to the reference group (13-24 months). The low use in short intervals was mainly attributable to lower proportion of planned pregnancies and fewer women with higher education. Among women with a preterm birth (
PubMed ID
24506308 View in PubMed
Less detail

Folic acid supplementation, dietary folate intake during pregnancy and risk for spontaneous preterm delivery: a prospective observational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266313
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:375
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Verena Sengpiel
Jonas Bacelis
Ronny Myhre
Solveig Myking
Aase Serine Devold Pay
Margaretha Haugen
Anne-Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Roy Miodini Nilsen
Per Magnus
Stein Emil Vollset
Staffan Nilsson
Bo Jacobsson
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:375
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Gestational Age
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Preconception Care
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Vitamin B Complex - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Health authorities in numerous countries recommend periconceptional folic acid supplementation to prevent neural tube defects. The objective of this study was to examine the association of dietary folate intake and folic acid supplementation during different periods of pregnancy with the risk of spontaneous preterm delivery (PTD).
The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study is a population-based prospective cohort study. A total of 66,014 women with singleton pregnancies resulting in live births in 2002-2009 were included. Folic acid supplementation was self-reported from 26 weeks before pregnancy until pregnancy week 24. At gestational week 22, the women completed a food frequency questionnaire, which allowed the calculation of their average total folate intake from foods and supplements for the first 4-5 months of pregnancy. Spontaneous PTD was defined as the spontaneous onset of delivery between weeks 22+0 and 36+6 (n = 1,755).
The median total folate intake was 313 µg/d (interquartile range IQR 167-558) in the overall population and 530 µg/d (IQR 355-636) in the supplement users. Eighty-five percent reported any folic acid supplementation from
Notes
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PubMed ID
25361626 View in PubMed
Less detail

Folic acid supplementation, dietary folate intake during pregnancy and risk for spontaneous preterm delivery: a prospective observational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108097
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13:160
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Verena Sengpiel
Jonas Bacelis
Ronny Myhre
Solveig Myking
Aase Devold Pay
Margaretha Haugen
Anne-Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Roy M Nilsen
Per Magnus
Stein Emil Vollset
Staffan Nilsson
Bo Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra, SE-416 85 Göteborg, Sweden. verena.sengpiel@obgyn.gu.se
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13:160
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Gestational Age
Humans
Norway
Nutrition Policy
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Time Factors
Vitamin B Complex - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
Health authorities in numerous countries recommend periconceptional folic acid to pregnant women to prevent neural tube defects. The objective of this study was to examine the association of folic acid supplementation during different periods of pregnancy and of dietary folate intake with the risk of spontaneous preterm delivery (PTD).
The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study is a population-based prospective cohort study. A total of 65,668 women with singleton pregnancies resulting in live births in 1999-2009 were included. Folic acid supplementation was self-reported from 26 weeks before pregnancy until week 24 during pregnancy. At gestational week 22, the women completed a food frequency questionnaire, which allowed the calculation of their average total folate intake from foods and supplements for the first 4-5 months of pregnancy. Spontaneous PTD was defined as the spontaneous onset of delivery between weeks 22+0 and 36+6 (n?=?1,628).
The median total folate intake was 266 µg/d (interquartile range IQR 154-543) in the overall population and 540 µg/d (IQR 369-651) in the supplement users. Eighty-three percent reported any folic acid supplementation from
Notes
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2007 Feb;196(2):107-1817306646
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Nov;84(5):1134-4117093167
Cites: Matern Child Nutr. 2008 Jan;4(1):14-2718171404
Cites: Matern Child Nutr. 2008 Jan;4(1):28-4318171405
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Jul;112(1):127-3418591318
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Jul 17;359(3):262-7318635431
Cites: Ann Nutr Metab. 2008;52(4):272-8018645244
Cites: PLoS Med. 2009 May 5;6(5):e100006119434228
Cites: PLoS Med. 2009 May 5;6(5):e100007719434229
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2009 Sep;102(5):777-8519327193
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2009 Nov;23(6):597-60819840297
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jan;91(1):231-719923379
Cites: Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2010 Feb;148(2):135-4019926391
Cites: J Nutr. 2010 Mar;140(3):572-920089778
Cites: BJOG. 2010 Jun;117(7):821-920353456
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Cites: Am J Perinatol. 2011 Dec;28(10):747-5221681695
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2012 Feb;206(2):124.e1-1922284156
Cites: BJOG. 2012 May;119(6):739-5122489763
Cites: J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2012 Aug;25(8):1423-722081889
Cites: Reprod Sci. 2012 Sep;19(9):939-4822527984
Cites: Nutr J. 2012;11:7522992251
Cites: Eur J Nutr. 2013 Feb;52(1):327-3622430980
Cites: Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 1999 Dec;87(2):105-10; discussion 103-410597955
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PubMed ID
23937678 View in PubMed
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Impact of singlehood during pregnancy on dietary intake and birth outcomes- a study in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266297
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:396
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Jorunn Farbu
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:396
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Eating - psychology
Family Characteristics
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mothers
Norway
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - psychology
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Prospective Studies
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Single Person - psychology
Smoking - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Little attention has been given to the impact of singlehood during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of marital status on diet during pregnancy and pregnancy outcome.
The study population comprised 62,773 women participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Marital status was categorised into singles living alone, singles living with parents and married/cohabiting (reference group). Participants answered a general health questionnaire in gestational week 15-17 and a food frequency questionnaire in gestational week 22. We used nonparametric tests to compare dietary intakes by marital status, and multiple logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for infants being small for gestational age (SGA), large for gestational age (LGA), and preterm delivery (defined as delivery before gestational week 37).
Single women living with parents had lower intakes of fruits and vegetables, higher intake of total energy, higher proportion of energy from added sugar, and lower intake of fibre than the reference group. Singles living alone also had a higher intake of added sugar. In both of the single groups, daily smoking was more prevalent than in women living with a partner. In analyses adjusted for maternal age, pre-pregnancy BMI, energy intake, energy contributed by protein, education, income, parity and nausea, single women living alone had increased risk of SGA with OR = 1.27 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.55). When smoking was included among the confounding variables, the association was no longer significant. Likewise, singles living alone had increased risk of preterm delivery, with OR = 1.32 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.72) in a partly adjusted model, but the association did not remain significant in a model fully adjusted for confounding variables.
Single mothers had lower dietary quality and included more smokers than women who lived with a partner. Single mothers living alone had higher prevalence of SGA and preterm delivery, but the associations with adverse pregnancy outcomes were confounded by other variables. This study shows that single mothers should be given special attention during antenatal care and counselling.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25475509 View in PubMed
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Infant birth size is not associated with maternal intake and status of folate during the second trimester in Norwegian pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98302
Source
J Nutr. 2010 Mar;140(3):572-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Roy M Nilsen
Stein Emil Vollset
Anne Lise B Monsen
Arve Ulvik
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Per Magnus
Per Magne Ueland
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen 5020, Norway. roy.nilsen@uib.no
Source
J Nutr. 2010 Mar;140(3):572-9
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Weight - drug effects
Diet Records
Dietary Supplements
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacology
Food analysis
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Young Adult
Abstract
Maternal folate status and smoking are potentially strong risk factors for infant birth size. We assessed the association of several folate indicators and smoking with birth outcomes in a subsample of participants in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, consisting of 2934 singleton pregnancies in 2002-2003. Blood plasma folate and cotinine concentrations and self-reported intake of food folate and supplemental folic acid were measured during the second trimester (median 18 wk). Birth outcomes included gestational age, infant birth weight, head circumference, crown-heel length, and small for gestational age (SGA). Mean total dietary folate intake from foods (mean 268.0 microg/d) and supplements (mean 187.7 microg/d) was 455.7 microg/d. Smokers (plasma cotinine > or = 85 nmol/L) had substantially lower supplemental folic acid intake than nonsmokers, but they did not differ regarding folate intake from food only. Nevertheless, smoking was correlated with plasma folate both before and after adjusting for total dietary folate intake (both P
PubMed ID
20089778 View in PubMed
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Intake of Caffeinated Soft Drinks before and during Pregnancy, but Not Total Caffeine Intake, Is Associated with Increased Cerebral Palsy Risk in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283700
Source
J Nutr. 2016 Sep;146(9):1701-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Mette C Tollånes
Katrine Strandberg-Larsen
Kacey Y Eichelberger
Dag Moster
Rolv Terje Lie
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Camilla Stoltenberg
Allen J Wilcox
Source
J Nutr. 2016 Sep;146(9):1701-6
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight - growth & development
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Postnatal Care
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Postnatal administration of caffeine may reduce the risk of cerebral palsy (CP) in vulnerable low-birth-weight neonates. The effect of antenatal caffeine exposure remains unknown.
We investigated the association of intake of caffeine by pregnant women and risk of CP in their children.
The study was based on The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, comprising >100,000 live-born children, of whom 222 were subsequently diagnosed with CP. Mothers reported their caffeine consumption in questionnaires completed around pregnancy week 17 (102,986 mother-child pairs), week 22 (87,987 mother-child pairs), and week 30 (94,372 mother-child pairs). At week 17, participants were asked about present and prepregnancy consumption. We used Cox regression models to estimate associations between exposure [daily servings (1 serving = 125 mL) of caffeinated coffee, tea, and soft drinks and total caffeine consumption] and CP in children, with nonconsumers as the reference group. Models included adjustment for maternal age and education, medically assisted reproduction, and smoking, and for each source of caffeine, adjustments were made for the other sources.
Total daily caffeine intake before and during pregnancy was not associated with CP risk. High consumption (=6 servings/d) of caffeinated soft drinks before pregnancy was associated with an increased CP risk (HR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.2, 3.1), and children of women consuming 3-5 daily servings of caffeinated soft drinks during pregnancy weeks 13-30 also had an increased CP risk (HR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.1, 2.8). A mean daily consumption of 51-100 mg caffeine from soft drinks during the first half of pregnancy was associated with a 1.9-fold increased risk of CP in children (HR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.6).
Maternal total daily caffeine consumption before and during pregnancy was not associated with CP risk in children. The observed increased risk with caffeinated soft drinks warrants further investigation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27489007 View in PubMed
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