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Advanced pubertal growth spurt in subjects born preterm: the Helsinki study of very low birth weight adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138699
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Feb;96(2):525-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Karoliina Wehkalampi
Petteri Hovi
Leo Dunkel
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Sture Andersson
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 30, Mannerheimintie 164, 00271 Helsinki, Finland. karoliina.wehkalampi@helsinki.fi
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Feb;96(2):525-33
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Growth - physiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - physiology
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight - physiology
Male
Menarche - physiology
Parents
Pregnancy
Puberty - physiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Voice - physiology
Abstract
Among people born at term, low birth weight is associated with early puberty. Early maturation may be on the pathway linking low birth weight with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Subjects born preterm with very low birth weight (VLBW;
PubMed ID
21147886 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advanced sleep-wake rhythm in adults born prematurely: confirmation by actigraphy-based assessment in the Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262758
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Sep;15(9):1101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Johan Björkqvist
Juulia Paavonen
Sture Andersson
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Jari Lahti
Kati Heinonen
Johan Eriksson
Katri Räikkönen
Petteri Hovi
Eero Kajantie
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Sep;15(9):1101-6
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature, Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm - diagnosis - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested a propensity towards morningness in teenagers and adults born preterm. We set out to study sleep in a subsample from The Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults cohort, with emphasis on sleep timing, duration, and quality. We compared young adults who were born prematurely at very low birth weight (VLBW;?
PubMed ID
24980065 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory blood pressure in young adults with very low birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148247
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Petteri Hovi
Sture Andersson
Katri Räikkönen
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Kati Heinonen
Riikka Pyhälä
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. petteri.hovi@helsinki.fi
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Odds Ratio
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
We hypothesized that, as compared with a matched control group born at term, young adults with very low birth weight (VLBW
PubMed ID
19796771 View in PubMed
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Behavioural symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in preterm and term children born small and appropriate for gestational age: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138618
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2010;10:91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kati Heinonen
Katri Räikkönen
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Sture Andersson
Eero Kajantie
Johan G Eriksson
Dieter Wolke
Aulikki Lano
Author Affiliation
Institute of Behavioral Science, P.O. Box 9, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. kati.heinonen@helsinki.fi
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2010;10:91
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Abstract
It remains unclear whether it is more detrimental to be born too early or too small in relation to symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Thus, we tested whether preterm birth and small body size at birth adjusted for gestational age are independently associated with symptoms of ADHD in children.
A longitudinal regional birth cohort study comprising 1535 live-born infants between 03/15/1985 and 03/14/1986 admitted to the neonatal wards and 658 randomly recruited non-admitted infants, in Finland. The present study sample comprised 828 children followed up to 56 months. The association between birth status and parent-rated ADHD symptoms of the child was analysed with multiple linear and logistic regression analyses.
Neither prematurity (birth
Notes
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Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2002 Feb;156(2):179-8711814381
PubMed ID
21159164 View in PubMed
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Birth size and childhood growth as determinants of physical functioning in older age: the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129768
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Dec 15;174(12):1336-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2011
Author
Mikaela B von Bonsdorff
Taina Rantanen
Sarianna Sipilä
Minna K Salonen
Eero Kajantie
Clive Osmond
David J P Barker
Johan G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Centre, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. mikaela.vonbonsdorff@jyu.fi
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Dec 15;174(12):1336-44
Date
Dec-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Birth weight
Body mass index
Body Weights and Measures
Breast Feeding
Child
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Growth
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The study reports on the associations of infant and childhood anthropometric measurements, early growth, and the combined effect of birth weight and childhood body mass index with older age physical functioning among 1,999 individuals born in 1934-1944 and belonging to the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. Physical functioning was assessed by the Short Form 36 scale. Anthropometric data from infancy and childhood were retrieved from medical records. The risk of lower Short Form 36 physical functioning at the mean age of 61.6 years was increased for those with birth weight less than 2.5 kg compared with those weighing 3.0-3.5 kg at birth (odds ratio (OR) = 2.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57, 4.72). The gain in weight from birth to age 2 years was associated with decreased risk of lower physical functioning for a 1-standard deviation increase (OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.75, 0.94). The risk of lower physical functioning was highest for individuals with birth weight in the lowest third and body mass index at 11 years of age in the highest third compared with those whose birth weight was in the middle third and body mass index at age 11 years was in the highest third (OR = 3.08, 95% CI: 1.83, 5.19). The increasing prevalence of obesity at all ages and the aging of populations warrant closer investigation of the role of weight trajectories in old age functional decline.
PubMed ID
22071586 View in PubMed
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Birthweight and mortality in adulthood: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136987
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Jun;40(3):647-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Kari R Risnes
Lars J Vatten
Jennifer L Baker
Karen Jameson
Ulla Sovio
Eero Kajantie
Merete Osler
Ruth Morley
Markus Jokela
Rebecca C Painter
Valter Sundh
Geir W Jacobsen
Johan G Eriksson
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Michael B Bracken
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. kari.risnes@ntnu.no
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Jun;40(3):647-61
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Birth weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death - trends
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mortality - trends
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Abstract
Small birth size may be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), whereas large birth size may predict increased risk of obesity and some cancers. The net effect of birth size on long-term mortality has only been assessed in individual studies, with conflicting results.
The Meta-analyses of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines for conducting and reporting meta-analysis of observational studies were followed. We retrieved 22 studies that assessed the association between birthweight and adult mortality from all causes, CVD or cancer. The studies were systematically reviewed and those reporting hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) per kilogram (kg) increase in birthweight were included in generic inverse variance meta-analyses.
For all-cause mortality, 36,834 deaths were included and the results showed a 6% lower risk (adjusted HR?=?0.94, 95% CI: 0.92-0.97) per kg higher birthweight for men and women combined. For cardiovascular mortality, the corresponding inverse association was stronger (HR?=?0.88, 95% CI: 0.85-0.91). For cancer mortality, HR per kg higher birthweight was 1.13 (95% CI: 1.07-1.19) for men and 1.04 (95% CI: 0.98-1.10) for women (P(interaction)?=?0.03). Residual confounding could not be eliminated, but is unlikely to account for the main findings.
These results show an inverse but moderate association of birthweight with adult mortality from all-causes and a stronger inverse association with cardiovascular mortality. For men, higher birthweight was strongly associated with increased risk of cancer deaths. The findings suggest that birthweight can be a useful indicator of processes that influence long-term health.
PubMed ID
21324938 View in PubMed
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Body mass index during childhood and adult body composition in men and women aged 56-70 y.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156795
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;87(6):1769-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Hilkka Ylihärsilä
Eero Kajantie
Clive Osmond
Tom Forsén
David Jp Barker
Johan G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, Helsinki, Finland. hilkka.yliharsila@ktl.fi
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;87(6):1769-75
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Adult
Aged
Aging - physiology
Birth weight
Body Composition
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Electric Impedance
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Social Class
Thinness
Abstract
The relation between the change in body mass index (BMI) through childhood and body composition in adult life is important because body composition is known to affect adult health.
The objective was to examine how the change in BMI throughout childhood is related to adult lean and fat mass.
We examined how the change in BMI in childhood was related to adult body composition in 885 men and 1032 women born during 1934-1944, whose weights and heights during childhood were recorded serially. Adult lean and fat mass were measured by bioelectrical impedance with an 8-polar tactile electrode system.
In these 56-70-y-old men and women, adult lean body mass index (lean mass/height(2); in kg/m(2)) was positively associated with BMI at birth (0.24 and 0.20 higher for each 1-SD increase in BMI at birth, respectively) and with more rapid gain in BMI from birth to 1 y (0.17 and 0.22), 1-2 y (0.21 and 0.20), 2-7 y (0.44 and 0.46), and 7-11 y (0.32 and 0.26) of age. Fat mass index (fat mass/height(2)) was positively associated with more rapid increases in BMI between 2 and 11 y of age.
Rapid gain in BMI before the age of 2 y increased adult lean body mass without excess fat accumulation, whereas rapid gain in BMI in later childhood, despite the concurrent rise in lean mass, resulted in relatively larger increases in fat mass.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;87(6):1587-918541543
PubMed ID
18541567 View in PubMed
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Body size at birth and socio-economic status in childhood: implications for Cloninger's psychobiological model of temperament at age 60.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156541
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2008 Aug 15;160(2):167-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2008
Author
Jari Lahti
Katri Räikkönen
Kati Heinonen
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Eero Kajantie
Tom Forsén
Clive Osmond
David J P Barker
Johan G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. jari.lahti@helsinki.fi
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2008 Aug 15;160(2):167-74
Date
Aug-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development - physiology
Adult
Age Factors
Aging - physiology - psychology
Birth weight
Body Size - physiology
Child
Child Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn - growth & development
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Social Class
Temperament - physiology
Abstract
Small birth size predicts various psychiatric outcomes, including depression. While biologically based temperamental traits may constitute a vulnerability factor for depression, the extent to which birth size predicts these traits in adulthood is not known. We studied, in 1369 women and men identified from a cohort born in 1934-44 in Helsinki, Finland, whether birth size predicts the temperamental traits measured with Cloninger's Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire at an average age of 63 years. Moreover, we examined whether socio-economic status (SES) in childhood modified the associations. Data on birth size were obtained from birth records, and SES in childhood was obtained from school records. Weight and length at birth showed curvilinear, reverse J-shaped effects on harm avoidance (HA), such that the highest HA scores were most characteristic of those born small. Furthermore, high HA was confined to those belonging to a low SES group in childhood regardless of birth size, and to those belonging to the high SES group in childhood if their birth size was small. The associations were independent of several confounders. Since small birth size as well as high HA in adulthood may associate with subsequent depression, our findings might shed light on understanding the early neurodevelopmental processes that predispose to depression through vulnerability characteristics.
PubMed ID
18573541 View in PubMed
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Cardiometabolic risk factors in young adults who were born preterm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265378
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun 1;181(11):861-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2015
Author
Marika Sipola-Leppänen
Marja Vääräsmäki
Marjaana Tikanmäki
Hanna-Maria Matinolli
Satu Miettola
Petteri Hovi
Karoliina Wehkalampi
Aimo Ruokonen
Jouko Sundvall
Anneli Pouta
Johan G Eriksson
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Eero Kajantie
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun 1;181(11):861-73
Date
Jun-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood glucose
Blood pressure
Body Weights and Measures
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Insulin Resistance
Lipids - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Adults who were born preterm with a very low birth weight have higher blood pressure and impaired glucose regulation later in life compared with those born at term. We investigated cardiometabolic risk factors in young adults who were born at any degree of prematurity in the Preterm Birth and Early Life Programming of Adult Health and Disease (ESTER) Study, a population-based cohort study of individuals born in 1985-1989 in Northern Finland. In 2009-2011, 3 groups underwent clinical examination: 134 participants born at less than 34 gestational weeks (early preterm), 242 born at 34-36 weeks (late preterm), and 344 born at 37 weeks or later (controls). Compared with controls, adults who were born preterm had higher body fat percentages (after adjustment for sex, age, and cohort (1985-1986 or 1987-1989), for those born early preterm, difference = 6.2%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.4, 13.2; for those born late preterm, difference = 8.0%, 95% CI: 2.4, 13.8), waist circumferences, blood pressure (for those born early preterm, difference = 3.0 mm Hg, 95% CI: 0.9, 5.1; for those born late preterm, difference = 1.7, 95% CI: -0.1, 3.4), plasma uric acid levels (for those born early preterm, difference = 20.1%, 95% CI: 7.9, 32.3; for those born late preterm, difference = 20.2%, 95% CI: 10.7, 30.5), alanine aminotransferase levels, and aspartate transaminase levels. They were also more likely to have metabolic syndrome (for those born early preterm, odds ratio = 3.7, 95% CI: 1.6, 8.2; for those born late preterm, odds ratio = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.2, 5.3). Elevated levels of conventional and emerging risk factors suggest a higher risk of cardiometabolic disease later in life. These risk factors are also present in the large group of adults born late preterm.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25947956 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents born preterm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260783
Source
Pediatrics. 2014 Oct;134(4):e1072-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Marika Sipola-Leppänen
Marja Vääräsmäki
Marjaana Tikanmäki
Petteri Hovi
Satu Miettola
Aimo Ruokonen
Anneli Pouta
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Eero Kajantie
Source
Pediatrics. 2014 Oct;134(4):e1072-81
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Adolescents and adults born as small preterm infants show more pronounced risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Whether similar risks apply across all degrees of preterm birth is poorly known.
We studied the association between preterm birth and cardiovascular risk factors in 6642 16-year-old adolescents of the population-based Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. Of these, 79 (1.2%) were born at
PubMed ID
25180275 View in PubMed
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61 records – page 1 of 7.